Candlelites

Everything from Everywhere

typewriters - Search

typewriters Searched between all the resources and sites across the web. To view the full text news click on the links searched. All links are displayed with the source site.



larry mcmurtry's typewriters sell at auction for $37,500


dallas — the two typewriters larry mcmurtry used to write his pulitzer prize-winning novel "lonesome dove" sold at auction for $37,500.heritage auctions sold the typewriters wednesday at an auction in new york city. eric bradley, a spokesman for the dallas-based auction house, said the typewriters sold to a bidder from texas who wished to remain anonymous.mcmurtry had told the associated press he "just decided that it would be fun" to sell the typewriters at auction, "and i actually have too many typewriters."the 80-year-old author and screenwriter said he still writes on a typewriter and has about 15 of them.while writing "lonesome dove," a tale of a cattle drive in the 1870s, he kept one typewriter in his hometown of archer city, texas, and the other in washington, d.c.






larry mcmurtry's typewriters auctioned for $37,500


dallas (ap) — the two typewriters larry mcmurtry used to write his pulitzer prize-winning novel “lonesome dove” sold at auction for $37,500.heritage auctions sold the typewriters wednesday at an auction in new york city. eric bradley, a spokesman for the dallas-based auction house, said the typewriters sold to a bidder from texas who wished to remain anonymous.this undated photo provided by heritage auctions shows two of larry mcmurtry’s typewriters which he used to write his pulitzer prize-winning novel “lonesome dove.” the two typewriters sold at auction for $37,500. heritage auctions sold the typewriters wednesday, march 8, 2017, at an auction in new york city. eric bradley, a spokesman for the dallas-based auction house, said the typewriters sold to a bidder from texas who wished to re






larry mcmurtry selling typewriters used for 'lonesome dove'


dallas — larry mcmurtry is selling the two typewriters he used to write his pulitzer prize-winning novel "lonesome dove."heritage auctions is offering up the typewriters in new york city next week. the dallas-based auction house expects them to sell wednesday for about $20,000.mcmurtry told the associated press he "just decided that it would be fun" to sell them at auction, "and i actually have too many typewriters."the author and screenwriter said he still writes on a typewriter and has about 15 of them.while writing "lonesome dove," a tale of a cattle drive in the 1870s, he kept one typewriter in his hometown of archer city, texas, and the other in washington d.c. the 80-year-old now splits his time between tucson, arizona, and archer city.






afternoon forecast: partly cloudy, high of 39


dan seger shared his collection of vintage typewriters with the public so they could type valentine's day cards the old fashioned way. during the type a valentine event amid the bustling saturday morning rush of the edelweiss bakery in prior lake, kids were especially fascinated by steger's five vintage typewriters: ranging from a 1937 secretarial l.c. smith to a 1967 olivetti underwood studio 45.






morning forecast: cooler, windy, still mild


dan seger shared his collection of vintage typewriters with the public so they could type valentine's day cards the old fashioned way. during the type a valentine event amid the bustling saturday morning rush of the edelweiss bakery in prior lake, kids were especially fascinated by steger's five vintage typewriters: ranging from a 1937 secretarial l.c. smith to a 1967 olivetti underwood studio 45.






tom hanks' debut book is due in october


new york — tom hanks is putting his love of vintage typewriters to good use — his collection of short stories will be published in october.the oscar-winning actor's first book, "uncommon type: some stories," features 17 stories, each in some way involving a different typewriter. it's due out oct. 24 from alfred a. knopf, the publisher said tuesday.among the stories written by hanks, who owns over 100 typewriters, is one about an immigrant arriving in new york city, another about a bowler who becomes a celebrity and another about an eccentric billionaire.hanks said in a statement that he began work on the stories in 2015: "i wrote in hotels during press tours. i wrote on vacation. i wrote on planes, at home, and in the office."






tom hank's debut book is due in october


new york — tom hanks is putting his love of vintage typewriters to good use — his collection of short stories will be published in october.the oscar-winning actor's first book, "uncommon type: some stories," features 17 stories, each in some way involving a different typewriter. it's due out oct. 24 from alfred a. knopf, the publisher said tuesday.among the stories written by hanks, who owns over 100 typewriters, is one about an immigrant arriving in new york city, another about a bowler who becomes a celebrity and another about an eccentric billionaire.hanks said in a statement that he began work on the stories in 2015: "i wrote in hotels during press tours. i wrote on vacation. i wrote on planes, at home, and in the office."






a peek inside seattle’s smith tower, which retains its historic charms


our photographer explores seattle's historic smith tower, which at 522 feet was the tallest building on the west coast when it was completed.lyman cornelius smith made his money in typewriters and firearms.his typewriters later became known as smith corona.his firearms were shotguns, the l.c. smith, or “sweet elsie,” considered one of the best ever made.in 1909, during a visit to seattle, the new yorker announced he would construct an 18-story building.his son, burns lyman smith, persuaded his dad to build a much taller skyscraper.he thought that would help generate publicity and boost sales of their typewriters.when the 42-story building opened on july 4, 1914, it was the fourth-tallest building in the world, at 522 feet.lyman cornelius smith did not live to see it completed, but his init






prior lake bakery invites you to write a valentine the old way — on a typewriter


tappa-tappa-tappa-tap! tappa-tappa-tap! ding!that’s the sound of “i love you” that should be clattering amid the doughnuts and scones at edelweiss bakery in prior lake on urday morning.no thumbs hovering over tiny alphabets, no fingers fluttering across plastic keys. we’re talking about people noisily banging out their adoration on cl ic olivettis and smith & coronas.yeah, typewriters.dan steger loves typewriters so much that he’s sharing the five he owns so that people can go old-school and type a love note to their sweetie for valentine’s day. he’s done it once before, letting kids type letters to santa claus.“the bakery is a community gathering place,” steger said. “people hear this noise, and they see these going, and they’re universally kind of intrigued.”kids seem especially fasc






humming along with the boston typewriter orchestra


though typewriters were built to last, it’s tough to use them for their original purpose thanks to the lack of ribbon, so the boston typewriter orchestra found another way to keep the good times rolling.it started off as a group of guys with a weird reason to get together, yet it turns out, many people miss the sweet sound of a smith-corona.full story at youtube via likecool.making music. posted by kate rinsema






music review: plenty of clever twists from peter mulvey


peter mulvey, "are you listening?" (righteous babe records)peter mulvey is fond of alternate guitar tunings, and alternate sequencing. on his 17th and latest album, "the last song" is the third of 13 songs. "song after the last song" comes eight songs later, just before the last song.this singer-songwriter marches to his own drum, even when there isn't one, and he has found a simpatico producer in ani difranco, who helps "are you listening?" deliver plenty of clever twists.mulvey quotes chekhov, and then recites his own poem. there are few instrumental breaks, even though he (mulvey, not chekhov) is a marvelous guitarist. but todd sickafoose does play a lovely bass solo.the tunes tackle the topical, from bullying ("just before the war") to trayvon martin ("which one were you?). mulvey also






lofree mechanical keyboard review: the feeling of a typewriter on your mac or io


i’m not a fan of apple keyboards. there’s nothing wrong with them technically. i just don’t like they way they feel. but i put up with them and over time, my dislike for them has lessened. for the past few weeks, i’ve (mostly) ditched the apple keyboard for the new lofree mechanical keyboard. what i found is that my frequent use of the apple keyboard influenced my experience with the lofree to mixed results. a different feel the lofree keyboard is being marketed as being “inspired by typewriters.” instead of square keys (like those found on apple and other keyboards), the lofree’s keys are round, like those you’d find on a typewriter. the round keys are also slightly concave, not flat like the apple keyboard keys, so your fingertips nestle in nicely. the lofree is a mechanical keyboard, an






music review: plenty of clever twists from peter mulvey


peter mulvey, "are you listening?" (righteous babe records)peter mulvey is fond of alternate guitar tunings, and alternate sequencing. on his 17th and latest album, "the last song" is the third of 12 songs. "song after the last song" comes eight songs later, just before the last song.this singer-songwriter marches to his own drum, even when there isn't one, and he has found a simpatico producer in ani difranco, who helps "are you listening?" deliver plenty of clever twists.mulvey quotes chekhov, and then recites his own poem. there are few instrumental breaks, even though he (mulvey, not chekhov) is a marvelous guitarist. but todd sickafoose does play a lovely bass solo.the tunes tackle the topical, from bullying ("just before the war") to trayvon martin ("which one were you?). mulvey also






the lofree is a mechanical keyboard for the 21st century


why it matters to you if you're aching for a little old-school cool in your digital life, the lofree is one of the few mechanical keyboards with wireless capabilities.modern technology just a bit too … modern for you? if the design aesthetic of the 21st century has you longing for something a bit more retro, there may be a solution. meet the lofree, a nostalgic yet decidedly new-age keyboard that combines elements of the past with today’s innovations and advances. heralded as “the first mechanical keyboard inspired by typewriters,” the lofree is an elegant take on a generation past.designed to delight your senses, the lofree has something for the eyes, ears, and your sense of touch. taking a page out of the typewriting book, the lofree features round keycaps that give it a familiar, classi






my new writing setup / boing boing


i'm one of those people who has trouble writing at length on my main machine, because of all the distractions it offers. email and messaging and social networking: they all combine to form the "ludic loop" that mark recently blogged about. i've tried various things over the years to help keep me focused, from simple full-screen word processors such as writeroom and focuswriter to gadgets like the alphasmart and freewrite. but apps are a tab away from fun, and glorified typewriters tend to expose their limitations in odd and frustrating ways. after a lot of experimentation, i've arrived at best-of-both-worlds option: proper apps running on a tiny old imac from when apple switched to intel chips. it's modern enough to run good software, play music and hook up to useful services like dropbox,






my new writing setup / boing boing


i'm one of those people who has trouble writing at length on my main machine, because of all the distractions it offers. email and messaging and social networking: they all combine to form the "ludic loop" that mark recently blogged about. i've tried various things over the years to help keep me focused, from simple full-screen word processors such as writeroom and focuswriter to gadgets like the alphasmart and freewrite. but apps are a tab away from fun, and glorified typewriters tend to expose their limitations in odd and frustrating ways. after a lot of experimentation, i've arrived at a best-of-both-worlds option: proper apps running on a tiny old imac from when apple switched to intel chips. it's modern enough to run good software, play music and hook up to useful services like dropbo






break antiquated colorado tax policy free of tabor


andy cross, denver post filethanks to tabor, what hasn’t changed much is tax policy in colorado, despite the fact that our state and its economy have been changing dramatically with each passing year.twenty-five years ago, few people had even heard of something called the “internet.” few people owned a cell phone. many people still used typewriters or wrote letters by hand, waiting patiently days or even weeks for their messages to be received.that was 1992. it was the same year voters in colorado passed something called the taxpayer’s bill of rights, or tabor. the amendment to the colorado constitution specified limits on how quickly state revenue could grow, and it mandated that tax policy changes had to go before voters.in the 25 years since tabor passed, we’ve come a long way in terms






sean spicer defends handcuffing a 5-year-old american boy for hours at an airpor


mistablik is an american high-school student who put his mind to finding alternate uses for the lockers that lined his school’s hallways — lockers that sit empty as students switch over to electronic textbooks — and decided to build a tiny, secure, arduino-based vending machine that would sell soda to his fellow students.fingers of steel chronicles the hardcore world of finger skateboarding. warning: some of the tricks are so gnarly you’ll wonder how fingerboarder chris heck escapes with fingers intact.slovenia’s maheno corporation manufactured a series of barbie-branded and white label typewriters for kids, with a hidden feature that allowed their owners to use them to produce messages encrypted with a simple substitution cipher.sadly, the boing boing store is about to say goodbye to some






a centrist coalition is our best hope


donald trump’s authoritarian trashing of american norms has created a political pigsty. principled conservatives are bravely standing up to the seedy populism unleashed by the sloppy and crude attacks on american institutions. centrist liberals should offer them backup.here’s a little story from the bad old days of the new york subway: on seeing a well-dressed man drop a w per on a subway platform, a well-dressed woman urged him to pick it up.“what’s the use?” the man said, gesturing at the filthy surroundings.“if people like us don’t maintain standards,” the woman replied, “then all is lost.”donald trump’s authoritarian trashing of american norms has created a political pigsty. principled conservatives are bravely standing up to the seedy populism unleashed by the sloppy and crude attacks






watch a model dangle off a skyscraper for a photo shoot / boing boing


in 1948, robert moog, age 14, was inspired by classical theremin performer clara rockmore to build his own theremin. then in 1964 moog designed a brand new kind of electronic instrument, a modular voltage-controlled synthesizer. that instrument and moog’s work since transformed the sound of modern music forever. to hear how, dive into this fantastic […]today my friends in rogue wave released the video for their lovely cover of pete townshend’s “let my love open the door.” the track is from their latest release “cover me,” a quite wonderful covers album that consists entirely of rogue wave going back to their 1980s musical roots, influences, and mix tape favorites. songs […]behold library hand, a font designed specifically for librarians without typewriters who created cards for card catalo






switch to these fonts to save on printer ink


it’s no secret that printer manufacturers don’t actually make their money on the printers themselves. instead, their profits lie in the ink and toner that those printers consume. a couple of years ago the internet went crazy for a middle-school student who conducted an experiment with font types in an effort to find which was the most economical. his findings led him to claim that the us government could save half a billion dollars a year in printing costs if it simply switched fonts. while his proposed font, garamond, does indeed consume less ink, it isn’t nearly as legible at smaller font sizes. thus the font size would have to increase, increasing the amount of ink used as well.while the student’s claims weren’t entirely true, it still got people thinking about the amount of ink particu