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13 things we saw at the march for life in washington dc


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don't ignore the child's story when gay couples commission babies


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flynn affair shows what it'll take for trump to restore self-government


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james poulos on tocqueville, death, sex, music, and living free


james poulos is a senior contributor at the federalist and author of the new book, “the art of being free: how alexis de tocqueville can save us from ourselves.” he joins federalist radio to explains what tocqueville might have to tell us about brittany spears, death, dating, sex, and living lives of freedom.“the way forward is obscure, whether in the small details or in the big picture,” poulos said. “in a strange way [tocqueville] is even more relevant to our pain and awkward anxiety in this moment than he was to his own time.”poulos offers some optimism in light of cultural challenges facing american institutions and religion. “there is still enough in the american character of that unreasonable yearning for rebirth and renewal…personally and together with those you care about and those






how american culture must restore its schools, art, and institutions


joy pullmann, managing editor at the federalist, interviewed professor and author dr. anthony esolen on the federalist radio hour. esolen discusses his latest book, “out of the ashes: rebuilding american culture” and how we can save art, beauty, from the crumbling institutions of western civilization and the ual revolution.dr. esolen also shared the story of a pus outrage against him at providence college where he is a literature professor. “i was the object of a month or two of pus-wide scorn,” he said. “all is not lost here but the fight is going to be bitter and bloody.”pullmann and esolen discussed some practical ways parents and children can restore culture and encounter the natural world. “we need the kids out doing wholesome play without the parents’ direction,” he said.listen here:






tension escalates between the press and the president


sarah westwood, white house correspondent at the washington examiner, joined mary katharine ham on federalist radio to give some insight into the white house briefing room and media groupthink. they recap trump’s attack of the media in thursday’s press conference and how he addressed the few policy questions that were asked.“i think the press underestimates how little they are liked and trusted, and how much people enjoy watching them get a little bit of their own medicine,” ham said.westwood explained how sean spicer has broken press conference protocol and why members of the media are upset. “it’s had the effect of changing up the kinds of questions we see in the briefing room, which is whatever the trending topic is that day,” she said.subscribe or listen below:subscribe to the federali






mary katharine ham on tom brady, roger goodell, and superbowl halftime shows


on the federalist radio hour, mary katharine ham discussed sunday’s big game, including the politicized commercials, expectations lady gaga’s half time performance, commissioner roger goodell’s latest antics, and superbowl traditions.rich cromwell, senior contributor at the federalist, explains why america needs to root for the patriots. guy benson, editor at townhall.com, gives his thoughts on the politicization of sports. and later in the hour, matt battaglia, explains why goodell yanked the infamous barstool sports’ media credentials and then lied about it.“[lady gaga] is right in that her message has always been something that now sounds like a lefty rebuke to donald trump, but actually could just be her normal performance,” ham said. “i’m not sure she would need to add that much, or n






tyler cowen on complacency, immobility, and american progress


economist tyler cowen joins the federalist radio hour to discuss how americans have become less mobile, less motivated and more complacent.tyler cowen, and economist and professor at george mason university, joins federalist radio to discuss his new book, “the complacent class: the self-defeating quest for the american dream.”“we’ve had the unquestioned presumption that more safety is always better and you want to dig yourself in and have a nice life,” cowen said. “and yes, that makes sense for most individuals, but when we do that socially and give up on risk-taking, we end up with up with a kind of stultification and that leaves us with what i call the complacent class.”domenech and cowen discussed the ways technology, education, and american productivity have not progressed or improved






tyler cowen on complacency, immobility, and american progress


economist tyler cowen joins the federalist radio hour to discuss how americans have become less mobile, less motivated and more complacent.tyler cowen, economist and professor at george mason university, joins federalist radio to discuss his new book, “the complacent class: the self-defeating quest for the american dream.”“we’ve had the unquestioned presumption that more safety is always better and you want to dig yourself in and have a nice life,” cowen said. “and yes, that makes sense for most individuals, but when we do that socially and give up on risk-taking, we end up with up with a kind of stultification and that leaves us with what i call the complacent class.”domenech and cowen discussed the ways technology, education, and american productivity have not progressed or improved and






cpac, media bias, beta males, and texas politics


erica grieder, texas-based journalist and author, joined ben domenech on the federalist radio to discuss cpac, conservative media, rick perry, and the nuances of texas politics.donald trump’s lack of ideology and tendency towards ethno-nationalist populism is a poor fit with republicans in texas, greider said. “even our democrats are not very populist in texas,” she said. “trump was a weak candidate in texas. he underperformed there. he lost the primary by 17 points to ted cruz.”domenech and greider discuss how the 2016 election results are reflective of both media bias and the differences between conservatives in red states and blue states. “you’re talking on some level about the differences between states where people have strong community ties and neighborhoods, where they feel they are






how vaccine mandates put vulnerable people's health and lives at risk


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what polling data tell us about immigration, policing, and discrimination


emily ekins, director of polling at cato institute, joins federalist radio hour to discuss the results from polling of americans on specific issues.emily ekins, research fellow and director of polling at the cato institute, shared some of her latest polling data on federalist radio. domenech and ekins discuss what polling says about immigration, refugees, cops, and the differences between democratic women and republican women who say they’ve been discriminated against.sometimes media coverage or reactions shared on facebook and twitter are not accurate representations of how most americans feel about an issue. “they actually found plurality to perhaps a slim majority in support of some sort of temporary ban like the one we saw this weekend,” she said. “the truth is people don’t feel comfor






did nyt deliberately snub 'gosnell' book from its bestseller list?


the new york times left a new book about infamous abortionist and serial murderer kermit gosnell off its bestseller list, despite its sales success.when gosnell: the untold story of america’s most prolific serial killer launched last week, it was no. 3 on amazon’s bestseller list, and took the top slot on the retailer’s “ new release” list. currently, gosnell is no. 15 on amazon’s “ new release” list, yet nyt won’t include it on its bestseller list.“this is shocking that the cover-up of the gosnell story is continuing even after the mainstream media were so criticized for failing to cover the trial,” said gosnell co-author ann mcelhinney. “it’s clear that this is a blatant fake list in a fake news newspaper.”the media has a long history of covering up news about the dark side of the aborti






next, women's march organizers want ladies to go on strike


the organizers behind the women’s march in washington dc, which mobilized hundreds of thousands of women in opposition to president donald trump the day after his inauguration, want women to stay home from work to prove a point. it’s not clear what point, however, or when they want this protest to happen. there’s little information beyond this tweet.as buzzfeed news has reported, the organizers behind the march are planning to do a lot more in the days to come. they’re hoping to get women who marched on january 21 to fuel leftist organizations including planned parenthood, emily’s list, and the national domestic workers alliance.it seems the strike may be in cahoots with other strikes organized by labor groups. a local chapter of service employees international union (seiu) is also plannin






journalism higher education and the future of news media


john miller, director of the dow journalism program at hillsdale college and writer at national review, joins federalist radio hour to discuss journalism, j-school students, higher education, and technological changes in how we consume books and essays.miller said he believes that no student should ever major journalism, but that there will be continue to be jobs for journalists even as media changes. “the world will always want content providers and i don’t know if in 10 years we’re going have no more paper newspapers…but the world will always want storytellers,” miller said.subscriber here or listen below:






the fashion of presidents and the essence of men's style


richard torregrossa is the author of “cary grant: a celebration of style.” he joined the federalist radio hour to discuss men’s style and how the fashion choices of figures like presidents and news anchors has an impact on their message.“it says something about [trump’s] aggression, and i think the way president obama dresses also says something about his lack of aggression,” torregrossa said. “president trump uses that size as a part his language.”later in the hour, domenech and torregrossa discuss the biggest mistakes most men make in their wardrobes and the key elements they should consider when upgrading their style. “the suit is the main event and everything else should be toned down,” he said.listen here:






fighting child slavery in the u.s. and abroad


tim ballard is the founder and ceo of operation underground railroad, an organization dedicated to rescuing victims of human trafficking, child slavery, and bringing justice to their perpetrators. ballard joins federalist radio to discuss the horrific details of this industry and how his team partners with law enforcement on operations around the world.“there are two million children forced into the commercial trade. there is five and half million children if you include slave labor,” ballard said.our is unique in their ability to work on the ground, empowering and providing resources for developing countries. “our main mission is empowering law enforcement, but we can do it through very aggressive means if they want us to,” he said.subscribe here or listen below:






a look at supreme court nominee's judicial philosophy


president donald trump's supreme court nominee, judge neil gorsuch, has made his judicial philosophy clear through opinions, speeches and other writings. he is widely described as a federalist and an originalist.a look at those judicial philosophies, opposing ones and an excerpt from gorsuch's writings on the concepts:___originalisma term coined in the 1980s to describe a judicial philosophy focusing on the text of the constitution and the founding fathers' intentions in resolving legal disputes. originalists argue that new legislation, rather than new interpretations of the constitution, is the best way to bring about social change and safeguard minority rights. originalists say relying on text doesn't mean they can't g ple with contemporary phenomena, such as the radio or internet.___liv






megan mcardle on valentine's day, marriage, and tips for the home cook


megan mcardle, columnist at bloomberg view, joins federalist radio to offer her best advice and economical perspective on valentine’s day, restaurants, and cooking at home. mcardle and domenech also discuss what the data says about couples who marry, divorce, or cohabitate.as a self-claimed “food communist”, mcardle explains the most economical ways to eat out with your significant other. “we have a negotiating process. we order everything jointing. we eat it jointly,” she said. “especially when you’re going out with another person who you have a long-term relationship with, you have all this potential for gains from trade.”mcardle discussed how the data shows that people should actually be looking to get married as soon as possible. “one of the really sad things is that people say ‘i have






who is judge neil gorsuch?


carrie severino, chief counsel and policy director of the judicial crisis network, joins federalist radio to discuss the nomination of judge neil gorsuch, his credentials, and the senate confirmation process.“in [gorsuch’s] writing style, in the types of arguments he makes, really evokes justice scalia,” severino said. “very entertaining, very thoughtful and well-argued. his commitment to those judicial principles is very clear through his writing.”they discuss the politics behind gorsuch’s confirmation and what whether we can expect trump to have one or two more nominations. “it’s not president obama’s seat. it’s not merrick garland’s seat. it’s not chuck schumer’s seat. this is a seat on the supreme court that ultimately belongs to the american people and the constitution has a method th






i will watch a trump press conference any time of any day


federalist senior editor mollie hemingway joined fox news’s “special report with bret baier” thursday to discuss president trump’s press conference.“i will watch a donald trump press conference at any time of any day,” hemingway said. after eight years of lengthy conferences with president obama, trump is a refreshing change.“yeah he’s rough around the edges, he’s imprecise with his language and that’s problematic, but focused on his goals, he’s business-like about that, and he punches back,” she said.“we’re coming out of weeks of this narrative that russia was in control of the election, and i think for a lot of people, they way they hear that is the media want them to believe they’re idiots for falling for this russia thing,” she said. “nobody was pushing back on that for a while, (trump






the biggest issues facing our navy and military strategy across the seas


bryan mcgrath is deputy director of the center for american seapower at the hudson institute. mcgrath joined the federalist radio hour to discuss a range of national security issues facing our navy, including the size of its fleet, the western pacific, and military technology.mcgrath said we have overused the navy while it’s become progressively smaller. “when the world gets no smaller, and the fleet does get smaller, and you overuse that fleet, you use it up faster,” he said. “we have a navy that is too small for the things we ask of it and we have not taken care of it.”domenech and mcgrath discussed military strategy and how the navy should respond to threats from other world powers like china. “we will not cede one inch of sea space. we will sail proudly and routinely through internatio






how social media impacts our news consumption, behavior, and productivity


cal newport, author of “deep work,” returns to the federalist radio hour to discuss his concept of digital minimalism and the psychology of social media. evaluating the way we use technological tools can increase productivity and improve systems of work flow.social media users are often unaware how their behavior is manipulated and used for gain by those in silicon valley. “we have to differentiate between information, the internet and it’s possibilities, and these very specific large conglomerates,” he said. “a lot of the issues we have comes from the behavior of these companies, not necessarily the information itself.”newport explains how when it comes to systems of workflow, complexity should not be the enemy. “we have to reject the tyranny of convenience and realize that if we’re willi






david frum on autocracy, healthcare, and predicting president trump


david frum, senior editor at the atlantic, joins federalist radio to discuss issues stirring inside the white house, house republicans’ healthcare plan, and how donald trump could build an autocracy in america.frum makes the case that we know enough about donald trump to know what type of president he will be. “there are positive things that could happen in the next four years. there are some bad things that could happen. the way you maximize the positive and overt the negative is by acting now,” he said.frum’s latest atlantic cover story explores the preconditions for what trump could do as president and how autocracy would work in a fully developed country. “there are a lot of stops on the ‘train of bad’ before you get to ‘hitler station,’ and i tried to think, what if we go the viktor o






how these conservative intellectuals shaped modern conservative thought


steven f. hayward is a professor at uc berkeley and the author of the new book, “patriotism is not enough: harry jaffa, walter berns, and the arguments that redefined american conservatism.” he joins the federalist radio hour to discuss the thinkers and writers who shaped the conservative movement and how they fit into america’s intellectual history.hayward explains how the students of leo strauss, such as harry jaffa and walter berns, focused on american political thought as opposed to european.“they argued more profoundly than anyone else that people like madison and hamilton…and the philosophy of the american founding… although it has some similarities to european conservatism, it also has some distinctive new things that it has to offer the world,” he said.later in the hour, they discu






vp: gorsuch will join supreme court 'one way or the other'


palm beach, fla. — vice president mike pence is pledging that supreme court nominee neil gorsuch will be seated on the high court "one way or the other."pence's comments during a speech in philadelphia to the federalist society, a conservative legal group, echoed president donald trump's comments from earlier in the week. trump urged the senate's republican leader to s longstanding rules and "go nuclear" if democrats block gorsuch.trump on tuesday nominated the 49-year-old gorsuch — a denver-based u.s. appellate court judge — to a lifetime appointment on the nation's highest court.pence says the supreme court seat left vacant by justice antonin scalia's death belongs to the american people.the vice president says he and trump will work with the senate to ensure gorsuch gets an up or down v






the american serial killer the media won't talk about: kermit gosnell


dr. kermit gosnell was convicted of murdering four people, including three babies, and it is suspected that he also killed hundreds, if not thousands of others in his “house of horrors” abortion clinic. ann mcelhinney and phelim mcaleer join the federalist radio hour to discuss their book, “gosnell: the untold story of america’s most prolific serial killer” and the upcoming film adaptation.“he’d give the women drugs to make them give birth… the babies were born alive and then he would kill them by stabbing them with scissors,” mcaleer said. “he’s in prison because he committed murder… his death toll goes back decades.”mcaleer and mcelhinney have made a dramatic film telling the story and drama of gosnell. “i think we felt a documentary wouldn’t have the same penetration in terms of story,






media need to stop being careless with trump coverage


federalist senior writer mary katharine ham joined cnn newsroom on monday to explain why media need to be precise when covering donald trump.in a rally on saturday night, trump made reference to a fox news segment in which a filmmaker said large waves of migrants were having trouble assimilating in sweden. his comment spurred a media firestorm, which compounded the confusion surrounding his remark.“when the president communicates something in the most careless way possible and is unclear, as he was with this sweden comment the other night, it is important for us to be there and not careless about what he said,” ham said.“a lot of the coverage of this turned into: ‘he’s making up a big terrorist incident!'”  she said. “although it was unclear, if we could have clarified with the white house






here’s your super bowl preview of the year’s biggest commercials


the super bowl is one of the most-watched tv programs of the year, so advertisers always spend big bucks to get their products in front of the millions of eyeballs watching the game. brands invest so heavily in super bowl sunday that their commercials are often big-budget productions.this year’s biggest commercial gamble comes from snickers. in hopes to sell the isfying candy bar to eaters old and new, the brand is enlisting star wars actor adam driver to star in a live commercial.it’s a big risk. the rest of the commercials that air on sunday will have been painstakingly s , edited, and focus-grouped before they hit the air. snickers is likely hoping to get enough publicity off the novelty of the live commercial and inclusion of driver to offset a potential crash and burn during the live






a historical look at totalitarianism through vaclav benda and charter 77


flagg taylor is a professor at skidmore college and author of the new book, “the long night of the watchman: essays by vaclav benda.” in light of the 40th anniversary of charter 77, taylor joined ben domenech on the federalist radio hour to discuss some of the key figures in czech history and the totalitarian regimes that rose in the wake of wwii.in his study of totalitarianism, taylor made trips to czechoslovakia to interview former dissents and their families. “you can feel that their reflections and writings come from the depths of their experiencing this repression, so i find that this is a great tool in explaining to students the phenomenon of totalitarianism,” he said.what lessons can be pulled from benda’s essays about life under these regimes and applied to today’s political landsc






mike pence warns democrats against filibuster of supreme court pick


vice president mike pence had a message for senate democrats threatening to filibuster president trump’s supreme court pick, judge neil gorsuch: don’t do it.in remarks to the federalist society in philadelphia urday, pence warned that a filibuster of gorsuch, which would require the senate to muster a 60-vote threshold to confirm the nominee, would be “unwise.” “several [senators] announced their opposition within minutes of his nomination and now they’re even threatening to use the filibuster procedure in the senate to stop him,” pence told the conservative audience members. “make no mistake about it: this would be an unwise and unprecedented act.”playvideocbs this morningsupreme court nominee gorsuch faces contentious confirmation battle president trump wants senate republicans to change






at liberal columbia u, gorsuch raised a conservative voice


new york — as a conservative student at columbia university in the mid-1980s, supreme court nominee neil gorsuch was a political odd man out, and he was determined to speak up."it is not fashionable at columbia to be anything other than a pro-sandinista, anti-reagan" protester, the then-sophomore wrote in a pus newspaper. "only in an atmosphere where all voices are heard, where all moral standards are openly and honestly discussed and debated, can the truth emerge."gorsuch often sounded those themes — a call for intellectual diversity and open debate, coupled with a dismissiveness of protesters — as he be e one of the right's most outspoken, though nuanced, voices on the manhattan pus. he co-founded a conservative newspaper, wrote for the main pus daily and ran for the university senate.th






at liberal columbia u, gorsuch raised a conservative voice


new york — as a conservative student at columbia university in the mid-1980s, future supreme court nominee neil gorsuch was a political odd man out, and he was determined to speak up."it is not fashionable at columbia to be anything other than a pro-sandinista, anti-reagan" protester, the then-sophomore wrote in a pus newspaper. "only in an atmosphere where all voices are heard, where all moral standards are openly and honestly discussed and debated, can the truth emerge."gorsuch often sounded those themes — a call for intellectual diversity and open debate, coupled with a dismissiveness of protesters — as he be e one of the right's most outspoken, though nuanced, voices on the manhattan pus. he co-founded a conservative newspaper, wrote for the main pus daily and ran for the university se






while a student at liberal columbia university, colorado’s neil gorsuch raised a


new york (ap) — as a conservative student at columbia university in the mid-1980s, future supreme court nominee neil gorsuch was a political odd man out, and he was determined to speak up.“it is not fashionable at columbia to be anything other than a pro-sandinista, anti-reagan” protester, the then-sophomore wrote in a pus newspaper. “only in an atmosphere where all voices are heard, where all moral standards are openly and honestly discussed and debated, can the truth emerge.”gorsuch often sounded those themes — a call for intellectual diversity and open debate, coupled with a dismissiveness of protesters — as he be e one of the right’s most outspoken, though nuanced, voices on the manhattan pus. he co-founded a conservative newspaper, wrote for the main pus daily and ran for the universi






here are media hottakes if the chronicles of narnia were released now


the press has certainly taken its lumps lately—and they’re not altogether undeserved. as federalist contributor tom nichols points out in his new book the death of expertise: the campaign against established knowledge, a great deal of journalism currently exists more to confirm its audience’s preconceived notions than to inform them about reality.nichols’ book inspired me to reflect on how politically obsessed and ideologically sequestered our press has become, particularly when it comes to hot-button social issues.  to illustrate this, let’s take the debate into the world of counterfactuals: in the alternate history where c.s. lewis’ classic children’s fantasy series is released this year and becomes a mega-hit, i think the hot takes would probably look something like these. the american






puzder’s withdrawal is no victory for progressives


a new nominee for secretary of labor may appear more respectable, but don't expect a change in policies that tilt toward companies and against workers.the two events wednesday were in exquisite contradiction. andrew puzder, the deeply unqualified nominee to be secretary of labor was forced to withdraw, prompting triumphal tweets by progressives. “activists won! people power!,” stated one.but in the first boots-on-the-ground example of how organized labor will do in this era of total republican control at the national level, workers overwhelmingly rejected the machinists at boeing’s north charleston, s.c., assembly.this is the national situation in microcosm: the left is loud but the right keeps winning elections in most places, especially where progressive policies and institutions would m






at liberal columbia u, gorsuch raised a conservative voice


new york (ap) — as a conservative student at columbia university in the mid-1980s, supreme court nominee neil gorsuch was a political odd man out, and he was determined to speak up.“it is not fashionable at columbia to be anything other than a pro-sandinista, anti-reagan” protester, the then-sophomore wrote in a pus newspaper. “only in an atmosphere where all voices are heard, where all moral standards are openly and honestly discussed and debated, can the truth emerge.”gorsuch often sounded those themes — a call for intellectual diversity and open debate, coupled with a dismissiveness of protesters — as he be e one of the right’s most outspoken, though nuanced, voices on the manhattan pus. he co-founded a conservative newspaper, wrote for the main pus daily and ran for the university sena






gorsuch was a conservative voice at liberal columbia u


new york (ap) — as a conservative student at columbia university in the mid-1980s, future supreme court nominee neil gorsuch was a political odd man out, and he was determined to speak up.“it is not fashionable at columbia to be anything other than a pro-sandinista, anti-reagan” protester, the then-sophomore wrote in a pus newspaper. “only in an atmosphere where all voices are heard, where all moral standards are openly and honestly discussed and debated, can the truth emerge.”gorsuch often sounded those themes — a call for intellectual diversity and open debate, coupled with a dismissiveness of protesters — as he be e one of the right’s most outspoken, though nuanced, voices on the manhattan pus. he co-founded a conservative newspaper, wrote for the main pus daily and ran for the universi






at liberal columbia u, gorsuch raised a conservative voice


new york (ap) — as a conservative student at columbia university in the mid-1980s, future supreme court nominee neil gorsuch was a political odd man out, and he was determined to speak up.“it is not fashionable at columbia to be anything other than a pro-sandinista, anti-reagan” protester, the then-sophomore wrote in a pus newspaper. “only in an atmosphere where all voices are heard, where all moral standards are openly and honestly discussed and debated, can the truth emerge.”gorsuch often sounded those themes — a call for intellectual diversity and open debate, coupled with a dismissiveness of protesters — as he be e one of the right’s most outspoken, though nuanced, voices on the manhattan pus. he co-founded a conservative newspaper, wrote for the main pus daily and ran for the universi






want to improve baseball? make the national league adopt the dh


major league baseball’s commissioner rob manfred wants his sport to be as “tight and compelling” as possible. so the mlb plans to test a number of changes in the low minors next season that might help generate more offense and speed up the game. most controversial among them is the idea of putting a runner at second base at the start of every extra inning. other changes include a proposal to raise and expand the strike zone and drop the four-pitch intentional walk. there has also been talk about shortening the season.in the federalist, kyle sammin offered a number of reasonable points in opposition to the potential man-on-second rule. me? i don’t believe these ideas go nearly far enough in producing offense or speeding up the game. rather than debate manfred’s experiments, though, i’d like






march if you want, but do it with class!


country legend loretta lynn has some advice for protesters in the trump era. speaking with rolling stone before the grammys, where lynn was nominated for best country album 50 years after her first nomination, she suggested a dash of class.“i think a march is fine,” the 84-year-old singer said. “but i thought that madonna and ashley judd … they got a little too far out. they should have done it with more class. for god’s sake, march if you want to, but do it with class.”lynn performed one of the better-known feminist anthems, “the pill”— a controversial single about birth control released in 1975 whose narrator is a mom of many who’s excited to live a new life with control over the timing of her pregnancies.this old maternity dress i’ve gotis goin’ in the garbagethe clothes i’m wearin’ fro






the american identity is not just ideas, but also its people and history


in the early stages of the trump presidency, the alliance between trump and american right is tenuous. the schism between trump’s populist nationalism and doctrine-based american conservatism remains, despite the president’s generally well-received cabinet picks and his nomination of judge gorsuch to the supreme court.in the latest cover story of national review, titled “for love of country,” rich lowry and ramesh ponnuru attempt to bridge this divide. they offer a strategy by which conservatism could temper the more volatile aspects of european-style nationalism, creating what they call a “benign nationalism”. writing in response, ben shapiro, one of the more consistently principled critics of trump on the american right, has argued that this endeavor is hopeless, and that european-style






if you have lots of kids, don't take people's comments too seriously


friends send me articles on the theme that the world has become less welcoming to big families and that parents with many kids face subtle—and often not so subtle—scorn. they ume that, as a mother of five, i can relate to this experience. but i don’t.some of the questions c andra chesser describes in her article in the federalist are familiar. especially having lived in three european countries over the last decade, all with anemic birth rates making families with even three children a rarity, i have had plenty of curious looks and questions about the decision to have more children than many others do.sure, a few nosy people asked about my religious affiliation and even if the kids were all from the some marriage (they are), which are certainly more personal questions than i’d pose to a st






sony xperia xa (2017) stars in a new video leak


if you recall, not too long ago, a number of renders leaked of successor (to be named) of the sony xperia xa. the easiest way to tell is the positioning of the front-facing era, as well as the usb-c port, and those corners with the funky design at around 01:36.paired with some interesting , the video by techlover hd is about 2 minutes long and shows the purported sony handset which carries the model number 'g3121'.the video shows a prototype of the aforementioned model in various angles, and a few menu screens that show its model number, android version, and its january 5 security patch.with a live video leak like this, it’s only a matter of time before sony officially announces more information about the xperia xa successor. this is expected to happen at mwc in about a month or so from to