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watch this mama bear carry her cubs across a river on her back / boing boing


foxwooldesigns will make you a perfectly pink felt tardigrade, and has one in stock to fulfill your immediate felt tardigrade requirements. this felt tardigrade is made of coral wool and is about five inches long. that’s about 250 times larger than a live tardigrade! my creatures are lovingly handcrafted from sheep’s wool in a process […]corgi’s fleet-footed technique and chicken’s cautious jabs are evenly matched until a new challenger arrives.haven’t we all seen a lot of pigs on the parkway? you’re driving along and happen to notice that the person in the next lane has their digit buried halfway up their snout, digging for truffles. and don’t ask me about what happens next—i just can’t deal with it. i can understand when 3-year-olds engage […]it’s easy to forget about your phone’s depend






watch this mama bear carry her cubs across a river on her back / boing boing


foxwooldesigns will make you a perfectly pink felt tardigrade, and has one in stock to fulfill your immediate felt tardigrade requirements. this felt tardigrade is made of coral wool and is about five inches long. that’s about 250 times larger than a live tardigrade! my creatures are lovingly handcrafted from sheep’s wool in a process […]corgi’s fleet-footed technique and chicken’s cautious jabs are evenly matched until a new challenger arrives.haven’t we all seen a lot of pigs on the parkway? you’re driving along and happen to notice that the person in the next lane has their digit buried halfway up their snout, digging for truffles. and don’t ask me about what happens next—i just can’t deal with it. i can understand when 3-year-olds engage […]if there’s such a thing as a household name f






8-legged extremophile freaks will outlive humanity (& maybe the sun)


the eight-legged micro-animal called a tardigrade could survive nearly all the way until the death of the sun, a new study suggests — long after humans are history. the study, from harvard and oxford universities, detailed the threats to life on earth over billions of years, finding that earth-pummeling asteroids, nearby supernova blasts and gamma-ray bursts would be unlikely to completely sterilize earth (taking out the little tardigrades in the process). tardigrades, which are usually less than a millimeter long (0.04 inches), are nearly indestructible, some of the most resilient forms of life on earth. they can survive for up to 30 years without eating, and can be frozen, boiled, squished under intense pressure, and exposed to the vacuum and radiation of space without ill effect. the an






8-legged extremophile freaks will outlive humanity (& maybe the sun)


the eight-legged micro-animal called a tardigrade could survive nearly all the way until the death of the sun, a new study suggests — long after humans are history. the study, from harvard and oxford universities, detailed the threats to life on earth over billions of years, finding that earth-pummeling asteroids, nearby supernova blasts and gamma-ray bursts would be unlikely to completely sterilize earth (taking out the little tardigrades in the process). tardigrades, which are usually less than a millimeter long (0.04 inches), are nearly indestructible, some of the most resilient forms of life on earth. they can survive for up to 30 years without eating, and can be frozen, boiled, squished under intense pressure, and exposed to the vacuum and radiation of space without ill effect. the an






these animals can survive until the end of the earth, astrophysicists say


tardigrades have a reputation as the toughest animals on the planet. some of these microscopic invertebrates shrug off temperatures of minus 272 celsius, one degree warmer than absolute zero. other species can endure powerful radiation and the vacuum of space. in 2007, the european space agency sent 3,000 animals into low earth orbit, where the tardigrades survived for 12 days on the outside of the capsule.to a group of theoretical physicists, tardigrades were the perfect specimens to test life’s tenacity. “life is pretty fragile if all your estimates are based on humans or dinosaurs,” said david sloan, a theoretical cosmologist at oxford university in britain.the tardigrade lineage is ancient. “tardigrade microfossils are reported from the early cambrian to the early cretaceous, 520 milli






many species in peril on endangered species day


from climate change to habitat fragmentation, pollution and human conflict, species around the world are facing a slew of threats to their survival.        






half the world's species could go extinct and you're part of the problem


for many people species on the verge of extinction are "out of sight, out of mind," but on endangered species day the national geographic society is making sure that no one will be able to look away.        






google's project ara was going to offer a tardigrade aquarium module


gif gif: dr. ralf wagnergoogle’s project ara modular smartphone was a weird concept that didn’t make it to market. the idea was to give users the option to change out custom modules for upgrades and odd individual features. a new report reveals that one of the most unusual modules would’ve featured a personal tardigrade aquarium. google has reportedly killed its long-delayed, much-hyped modular smartphone initiative, project… read more read moreventurebeat has taken a look back at all that could’ve been if project ara had made it past the prototype stage. an e-ink display with weather updates, a high-quality microphone, and a breath mint dispenser were among the novelty modules that would be optional. but google wanted to commission something that would make an impression and get people ta






google's project ara was going to offer a tardigrade aquarium module


gif gif: dr. ralf wagnergoogle’s project ara modular smartphone was a weird concept that didn’t make it to market. the idea was to give users the option to change out custom modules for upgrades and odd individual features. a new report reveals that one of the most unusual modules would’ve featured a personal tardigrade aquarium. google has reportedly killed its long-delayed, much-hyped modular smartphone initiative, project… read more read moreventurebeat has taken a look back at all that could’ve been if project ara had made it past the prototype stage. an e-ink display with weather updates, a high-quality microphone, and a breath mint dispenser were among the novelty modules that would be optional. but google wanted to commission something that would make an impression and get people ta






8-legged extremophile freaks will outlive humanity (& maybe the sun)


the eight-legged micro-animal called a tardigrade could survive nearly all the way until the death of the sun, a new study suggests — long after humans are history.






this is the toughest animal on earth


what do you think the toughest animal on earth is? rhino? maybe a pit bull? your average house cat? nope, it’s a tardigrade, which sounds like something from dr. who but isn’t.full story at youtube.more great animals. posted by josh urich






the incredible way tardigrades survive total dehydration


a scanning electron micrograph image of six tardigrades in their dehydrated state. when tardigrades dry out they retract their legs and heads within their cuticle forming a ball like shape known as a “tun.” (image: t. c. boothby)tardigrades, also known as “water bears,” are probably the toughest microscopic creatures on the planet, capable of surviving freezing, radiation, and even the vacuum of space. they’re also able to withstand complete dehydration—and scientists have finally figured out how they do it. advertisementresearchers from the university of north carolina, chapel hill, have discovered a unique set of proteins, now known as tardigrade-specific intrinsically disordered proteins (tdps), that turns parts of the tardigrade’s body into a glass-like substance when it dries out, pro






endangered species by the numbers


from climate change to habitat fragmentation, pollution and human conflict, species around the world are facing a slew of threats to their survival.        






these are the global hotspots for alien species


alien species are a global problem, but they're a particular headache in certain hotspots of the world. an alien species, in this context, is not a creature from outer space but an animal or plant introduced by humans outside of its natural area of distribution. a small but important number of alien species — an estimated 5 to 20 percent — become invasive, which means they pose a serious threat to biological diversity in their new environments, according to the international union for conservation of nature. the top three global hotspots for alien species are the hawaiian islands, new zealand's north island, and indonesia's lesser sunda islands, according to a new analysis of alien species across 186 islands and 423 mainland regions worldwide. invasive species are quiet (or not-so-quiet) f






construction of montana dam blocked by endangered ancient fish species


u.s. district judge brian morris said the long-snouted pallid sturgeon species could go extinct if action isn't taken






western governors back endangered species act, with changes


the republican-dominated western governors association has endorsed the aims of the endangered species act but asked congress to make changes, including giving states a bigger role and clarifying recovery goals for animals protected by the law.the association approved a resolution on the act wednesday during a meeting in whitefish, montana.the association includes 14 republicans, six democrats and two independents. the vote count wasn’t released.endangered species protection is controversial because it usually brings restrictions on mining, petroleum drilling, agriculture and other activities.most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 for 4 weeks.the governors said western states benefit economically from healthy species and ecosystems but bear the burden of those restrictions and some






world is home to '60,000 tree species'


image copyrightbgciimage caption bhutan's national tsenden tree, conserved through international efforts there are 60,065 species of trees in the world, according to a comprehensive study of the world's plants.botanical gardens conservation international (bgci) compiled the tree list by using data gathered from its network of 500 member organisations.it hopes the list will be used as a tool to identify rare and threatened species in need of immediate action to prevent them becoming extinct.details of the study appear in the journal of sustainable forestry.image copyrightbgciimage caption seeds of the karomia gigas tree, the last six remaining were found in tanzania the data revealed that brazil was the nation with the greatest number of tree species, home to 8,715 varieties.apart from the






mushroom guide - north america download


download download this beautifully illustrated mushroom identification guide puts a constantly growing catalog of fungi on your iphone, ipad or ipod touch. great for use as a field guide or just to learn about interesting species of mushrooms. hand drawn scientific illustrations for each species by renowned artist and avid mycophile julie himes. as we add new species they are automatically downloaded to your catalog and saved for offline use. map - privately save the location of your finds using the map feature. each species in the catalog contains the following information: scientific namecommon nameclass - order - familyedibilityetymologyhabitatseasonsimilar speciescap shapecap sizecap texturehymenium typehymenium shapestipe shapestipe sizestipe characteristicsecologyspore print.






hundreds of north american bee species face extinction: study


more than 700 of the 4,000 native bee species in north america and hawaii are believed to be inching toward extinction due to increased pesticide use leading to habitat loss, a scientific study showed on wednesday.the center for biological diversity’s report concluded that of the 1,437 native bee species for which there was sufficient data to evaluate, about 749 of them were declining. some 347 of the species, which play a vital role in plant pollination, are imperiled and at risk of extinction, the study found.“it’s a quiet but staggering crisis unfolding right under our noses that illuminates the unacceptably high cost of our careless addiction to pesticides and monoculture farming,” its author, kelsey kopec, said in a statement.habitat loss, along with heavy pesticide use, climate chang






ikijime tool extreme download


download download the ikijime tool extreme app helps anglers dispatch their fish quickly and humanely using the ikijime method of brain destruction, a method scientifically proven to minimise stress for the fish while also maximising its eating qualities. the 2.0 version of this app provides fast and unrestricted access to the database from www.ikijime.com, with cool photos and x-rays of a wide range of fish popularly targeted by anglers in australia (100 species, 38 families), new zealand (27 species, 16 families), north america (53 species, 25 families), south america (40 species, 23 families), europe (31 species, 19 families), asia (83 species, 32 families) and africa (65 species, 28 families) together with helpful information on their brain location and other interesting fishy facts. g






scientists in south africa reveal more on human-like species


johannesburg (ap) — a species belonging to the human family tree whose remnants were first discovered in a south african cave in 2013 lived several hundred thousand years ago, indicating that the creature was alive at the same time as the first humans in africa, scientists said tuesday.a meticulous dating process showed that homo naledi (nah-leh-dee), which had a mix of human-like and more primitive characteristics such as a small brain, existed in a surprisingly recent period in paleontological terms, said prof. lee berger of the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. berger led the team of researchers, which also announced that they had found a second cave with more fossils of the homo naledi species, including a relatively well-preserved skull of an adult male.the conclusion t






earth faces "biological annihilation" in sixth mass extinction, scientists warn


over the last half-billion years, scientists say there have been five mass extinction events on earth in which a wide diversity of species on this planet suddenly died off. now, there's growing evidence that a sixth mass extinction is unfolding, according to scientists who track species around the globe. in a new study, researchers say the current mass extinction is even "more severe than perceived" and amounts to "biological annihilation" affecting thousands of species.in the study, published monday in the journal proceedings of the national academy of sciences, researchers from stanford university and the national autonomous university of mexico unveiled a granular look at population trends among 27,600 species of birds, amphibians, mammals, and reptiles — half of the world's known terre






scientists in south africa reveal more on human-like species


johannesburg — a species belonging to the human family tree whose remnants were first discovered in a south african cave in 2013 lived several hundred thousand years ago, indicating that the creature was alive at the same time as the first humans in africa, scientists said tuesday.a meticulous dating process showed that homo naledi (nah-leh-dee), which had a mix of human-like and more primitive characteristics such as a small brain, existed in a surprisingly recent period in paleontological terms, said prof. lee berger of the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. berger led the team of researchers, which also announced that they had found a second cave with more fossils of the homo naledi species, including a relatively well-preserved skull of an adult male.the conclusion that h






reef fishes of the east indies


this is the definitive app guide to every known species of reef fish in the east indies, the most bio-diverse marine region on earth (including all wide-ranging indo-pacific reef species as well). by globally recognized marine scientists dr. gerald allen and dr. mark erdmann, the long-awaited android version includes distribution maps for every species, and over 4, 000 p og hs including multiple life history stages for many species, reef fishes of the east indies is perfect for field work: no internet connection required, and no id books to haul around. this app contains many interactive features enabling you to: search over 2, 700 species organized by family and genus, including the rarest, most beautiful, and most recently discovered species. see over 4, 000 color p og hs - crystal cl






over 2,900 species: a look at florida's indian river lagoon


on the indian river lagoon, fla. — florida's indian river lagoon, which is actually three lagoons stretching 156 miles along the state's atlantic coast, is the nation's biggest barrier island complex and its most biodiverse waterway, according to federal officials.some facts about the lagoon:—it is home to more than 2,000 plant species, 600 fish species and 300 bird species, according to the national estuary council.—fifty-three threatened or endangered species, including the west indian manatee and the eastern indigo snake, make their home in the lagoon at some point in their lives.—since 2011, algal blooms have increased in the lagoon, along with fish and animal deaths. two of these years have been termed "super blooms" because algae levels were historically high and fish kills numbered






danger map reveals home of next killer


image copyrightecohealthalliancesouth and latin america is a hotbed of potential viruses that could be the next major threat to the world's health, according to "danger maps". the ecohealth alliance in new york looked at mammals, the viruses they harbour and how they come into contact with people. it revealed bats carry more potential threats than other mammals. the researchers hope the knowledge could be used to prevent the next hiv, ebola or flu. some of the most worrying infections have made the jump from animals to people - the world's largest ebola outbreak seemed to start in bats, while hiv came from chimpanzees. image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption bats were predicted to have the most "missing" viruses the researchers' challenge - and it was far from easy - was to predict from w






danger map reveals health threat zone


image copyrightecohealthalliancesouth america is a hotbed of potential viruses that could be the next major threat to the world's health, according to "danger maps". the ecohealth alliance in new york looked at mammals, the viruses they harbour and how they come into contact with people. it revealed bats carry more potential threats than other mammals. the researchers hope the knowledge could be used to prevent the next hiv, ebola or flu. some of the most worrying infections have made the jump from animals to people - the world's largest ebola outbreak seemed to start in bats, while hiv came from chimpanzees. image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption bats were predicted to have the most "missing" viruses the researchers' challenge - and it was far from easy - was to predict from where the n






danger map reveals health threat zone


image copyrightecohealthalliancesouth america is a hotbed of potential viruses that could be the next major threat to the world's health, according to "danger maps". the ecohealth alliance in new york looked at mammals, the viruses they harbour and how they come into contact with people. it revealed bats carry more potential threats than other mammals. the researchers hope the knowledge could be used to prevent the next hiv, ebola or flu. some of the most worrying infections have made the jump from animals to people - the world's largest ebola outbreak seemed to start in bats, while hiv came from chimpanzees. image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption bats were predicted to have the most "missing" viruses the researchers' challenge - and it was far from easy - was to predict from where the n






environmental group targets border wall, says prototypes will imperil desert spe


the center for biological diversity will file the third environmental legal challenge to president trump’s border wall, charging it will harm species.        






5 animals on the brink of extinction today


many animal species are endangered or threatened, but some are in a more dire situation than others. there are animals whose populations are so diminished that they could fit into a space the size of a small house. despite conservation efforts, many endangered species are still threatened by poachers or can get caught up in the…






genome 10k wants to sequence the genome of thousands of endangered species


why it matters to you sequencing the genome of 10,000 different animal species can help reveal vital information about which ones are endangered and maybe even teach us a bit about our own history, too.you’ve quite possibly heard of the human genome project, the massive international science research project dedicated to sequencing the human dna. a less well-known project called genome 10k has a not-unrelated mission — but instead of mapping just the human genome, it’s dedicated to sequencing the genome of thousands of animal species, including those most at risk of extinction.“the purpose of the genome 10k project is to assemble a genomic zoo of dna sequences representing the full diversity of vertebrate animals, including at least 10,000 different vertebrate species,” david haussler, the






the importance of maintaining the endangered species act


helen h. richardson, denver post filethe gunnison sage grouse is one of 17 animals in colorado listed under the endangered species act. the act was signed into law by congress in 1973.re: “the endangered species act works, so why is congress trying to dismantle it?” may 26 guest commentary.thank you to ralph morgenweck, a former u.s. fish and wildlife service official, for his dedication and service to our imperiled wildlife, and thanks to the denver post for publishing his article. i’m grateful that individuals who know first-hand about the protections provided by the endangered species act speak out on its behalf. it’s also important for ordinary citizens like me to speak out.as morgenweck pointed out, the esa works. the protections provided by the esa defend species diversity on our pla






how tardigrades survive extreme conditions / boing boing


tardigrades, the tiny creatures also known as water bears, are a house favorite at boing boing. able to survive in the most extreme conditions, from alcohol immersion to empty space, their resilience poses difficult scientific questions. scientists believe they've found the answer, and have published their findings in molecular cell.wired's matt simon writes: ...researchers claim they’ve found an exclusively tardigradean protein that the creature produces, forming it into a glass bead. it’s in this state that the water bear can pull off such extreme feats of survival—which might be very convenient for human medicine one day. the problem with the [earlier] trehalose theory, as it turned out, was that while many other organisms like nematode worms and brine shrimp use it to survive desiccati






scientists are bringing back extinct species


this article originally appeared on the conversation. de-extinction–the science of reviving species that have been lost–has moved from the realm of science-fiction to something that is now nearly feasible. some types of lost mammals, birds or frogs may soon be able to be revived through de-extinction technologies. but just because we can, does it mean we…






in 2016, scientists discovered 18,000 new species. now meet the top 10


life on earth is relentlessly diverse, and every year brings thousands of new examples.in 2016, science described around 18,000 new plant and animal species. some resemble figures from popular culture, others a nightmare come to life. some were found lurking underground or beneath the sea, while many had been hiding in plain sight all along.each year, the suny college of environmental science and forestry and an international panel of taxonomists compile a list of their top 10 new species. (read the 2016 list here.)since the list’s inaugural year in 2008, more than 200,000 species have been discovered and named.“this would be nothing but good news were it not for the biodiversity crisis,” quentin wheeler, the college’s president and founding director of the international institute for spec






bone more to save your species, maybe!


image: andreas trept/wikimedia commonsboning is one of the most important actions in the evolutionary game. who we bone ultimately decides what traits get passed on to the next generation, and whether we continue along as one species with a diverse set of traits, or if isolation of certain traits eventually turns us into multiple species. but what if we bone a lot of different partners all over the world?advertisementthe conventional wisdom is that more boning means more species faster. that’s because new features popping up that were more likely to attract a partner’s attention could lead to faster diversification. but a new paper studying polygamy in shorebirds finds the opposite: more partners actually seems to decrease the rate at which those populations began to diverge and become dif






meet the sex-crazed tortoise that saved his species


diego may not look like a casanova at first glance, but he’s a tortoise that can look back over his 100 or so years on earth with a sense of well-earned pride.originally from the famed galápagos, this giant tortoise fortunately developed an eye for the ladies and the reproductive prowess to go with it. conservative estimates say he’s fathered at least 350 offspring, while others chalk up to 800 to his name.to put that number in perspective, back in the ’70s, there were only around a dozen chelonoidis hoodensis left in the world. some experts worry that diego’s starring role in the species’ comeback spells trouble thanks to a lack of genetic diversity, while others say populations springing from only a few loins has brought back a species before and will do so again.full story at ny times.s