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study shows software used to predict repeat offenders is no better at it than un


compas, a piece of software commonly used in the justice system to predict which offenders will find themselves behind bars again, is no better than soliciting random people on mechanical turk to determine the same thing, a new study has found. oh, and they’re both racially biased.julia dressel and hany farid of dartmouth college looked into the system amid growing skepticism that automated systems like compas (correctional offender management profiling for alternative sanctions) can accurately predict something as complex as recidivism rates.to test this, they recruited people on amazon’s mechanical turk to review an offender’s sex, age, and criminal record (minus, of course, whether the person did eventually recidivate, or reoffend). the people were then asked to provide a positive (will






pumas, panthers terrified of humans, study shows


humans fear predators like mountain lions, but what we often fail to realize is how much they may fear us. after all, humans hunted and extirpated the animal from most of the united states, while fatal puma attacks on humans are rare. new research shows that the pumas—also known as panthers, cougars, mountain lions or catamounts—immediately…






proposal: revoke licenses for repeat drunken drivers


madison, wis. — wisconsin lawmakers will soon consider a bill that would strip repeat drunken drivers of their licenses for at least a decade. the assembly passed the bill last session but it didn't get a floor vote in the senate. some key things to know about the legislation:___how serious a problem is repeat drunken driving in wisconsin?very serious. state department of transportation data shows that one-third of the state's drunk-driving convictions in 2015 — the most recent data available — were repeat offenders. put another way, the 221,576 repeat offenders were more than twice the population of green bay.about 52,000 convictions were for a third offense. nearly 2,800 were for a seventh offense or more.___why is this such an issue in wisconsin?alcohol is ingrained in the state's herit






wisconsin bill would strip repeat drunken drivers of their licenses for at least


wisconsin lawmakers will soon consider a bill that would strip repeat drunken drivers of their licenses for at least a decade. the assembly passed the bill last session but it didn't get a floor vote in the senate. some key things to know about the legislation:how serious a problem is repeat drunken driving in wisconsin?very serious. state department of transportation data shows that one-third of the state's drunk-driving convictions in 2015 — the most recent data available — were repeat offenders. put another way, the 221,576 repeat offenders were more than twice the population of green bay.about 52,000 convictions were for a third offense. nearly 2,800 were for a seventh offense or more.why is this such an issue in wisconsin?alcohol is ingrained in the state's heritage and traditions. af






wisconsin bill would strip repeat drunken drivers of their licenses for at least


wisconsin lawmakers will soon consider a bill that would strip repeat drunken drivers of their licenses for at least a decade. the assembly passed the bill last session but it didn't get a floor vote in the senate. some key things to know about the legislation:how serious a problem is repeat drunken driving in wisconsin?very serious. state department of transportation data shows that one-third of the state's drunk-driving convictions in 2015 — the most recent data available — were repeat offenders. put another way, the 221,576 repeat offenders were more than twice the population of green bay.about 52,000 convictions were for a third offense. nearly 2,800 were for a seventh offense or more.why is this such an issue in wisconsin?alcohol is ingrained in the state's heritage and traditions. af






new state law aims to limit where california judges place violent sex offenders


a state law signed by gov. jerry brown this week would make it harder for violent sex offenders released under a court's conditions to live in counties where they have no work or family ties.assembly bill 255 will require judges to consider additional factors, such as residential, family or employment connections, when weighing where to release offenders who fall under the sexually violent predator program. offenders in the program have been convicted of a sexually violent offense and diagnosed with a mental disorder making them likely to repeat their crime. inmates must complete rehabilitation treatment at a state hospital after fulfilling their prison sentences before they are released into the community. under the new law, courts will have to find that there are extraordinary circumstan






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download download we've developed an interactive rescue system with all the resources an untrained bystander will need to save a life - while an ambulance is en route to the scene of an emergency. the mobilize app and the medical supplies correspond exactly, to make saving a life as simple as possible for an untrained bystander. key features- interactive medical treatment instructions- location feature of medical equipment- timer functions necessary for treatment of specific injuries- cpr- interactions with cpr and aedsour mission is to empower untrained bystanders to save lives - by equipping them with the resources necessary to respond to a medical emergency.






what is that dog trying to say? ask its owner


when it comes to interpreting dog growls, some humans are surprisingly good at taking the hint, a new study shows. scientists testing how people categorized different types of natural growls found that people could largely tell playful vocalizations from threatening ones — though women and dog owners seemed to do better than their peers.the findings, described in royal society open science, shed light on the relationship between dogs and humans — as well as on underlying vocal behaviors that might be shared across mammalian species.plenty of research in recent years has delved into dogs’ ability to understand humans. but relatively little seems to have focused on whether humans are any good at understanding dogs — even though communication is a two-way street, especially in two species tha






industrial robots are good for the economy, study suggests


investment in robotics has a greater positive impact on the economy than information technology, construction or real estate, according to a new report from the centre of economic business research (cebr). this is quite contrary to the widespread notion that robots will steal jobs from humans. while they certainly displace jobs, industrial robots can also give companies new growth opportunities. the new report finds that the united states is currently leading the way with an estimated robotics stock of $732 billion.the study focuses on the impact of robotics automation on economic development from 1993 to 2015. it includes 23 countries that are part of the oecd (organisation for economic co-operation and development), a group of countries with highly developed economies and democratic gove






assembly approves stiffer ignition interlock rule


madison, wis. — the state assembly has approved a bill that would create stiffer ignition interlock rules for drunken drivers.the bipartisan-supported measure passed wednesday would prohibit all repeat offenders as well as first-time offenders with a blood alcohol percentage of 0.15 or greater from driving any vehicle without an ignition interlock.state law already requires all offenders to place an interlock on their vehicles when their license is reinstated. the bill's supporters worry that offenders will drive someone else's car before they regain their license, resulting in a ticket for driving without a license but not for violating the interlock requirement.republican rep. jim ott, the bill's sponsor, says the bill closes the "interlock loophole."the assembly approved the measure on






which cars are most distracting? aaa study reveals offenders


touchscreen systems in new vehicles are too distracting, putting motorists at risk of crashes, according to a new aaa study.        






bills toughening drunken driving law up for vote


madison, wis. (ap) — two bills toughening wisconsin’s drunken driving laws are up for a vote in the state senate.one bill up for senate approval tuesday calls for permanently revoking a person’s license after a fourth drunken driving offense or after a second offense in conjunction with other related vehicular offenses.a similar measure failed to pass the legislature last session.another proposal up for final approval tuesday would prohibit all repeat offenders as well as first-time offenders with a blood alcohol percentage of 0.15 or greater from driving any vehicle without an ignition interlock.most read storiessale! save over 90% on digital access.state law already requires all offenders to place an interlock on their vehicles when their license is reinstated. the bill’s supporters worr






you need 86 candidates to hire that one right person – the denver post


by gene marks, the washington postfinding the right employee is not easy and a new study proves why.according to research by recruiting software service lever, a typical small business employing fewer than 200 people needs to go through an average of 86 applications to find that one right person for the job. the study looked at data from about 1.5 million candidate considerations and 15,000 hires at 600 of lever’s customers throughout most of 2016. although reviewing that many candidates sounds like a lot of work, this rate is actually better than most larger companies, who need to see an average of 100 candidates before hiring someone.finding new people, especially for a small business, is a long process. the study shows that companies only offer invites for an initial conversation to 17






revamped plan to crack down on repeat gun offenders advances in state legislatur


chicago police superintendent eddie johnson on thursday implored lawmakers to pass a revamped plan to crack down on repeat gun offenders, saying it was time to hold people accountable for terrorizing neighborhoods.mayor rahm emanuel has been working with house republican leader jim durkin of western springs, who is sponsoring the proposal to raise prison sentences for some gun felons. the effort marks a rare area of agreement between emanuel and gov. bruce rauner, who supports the legislation.following johnson's testimony before a house committee, lawmakers advanced the plan over the objections of some democrats representing predominately black and latino communities. they contended that the bill would lead to a spike in minority incarceration and that there was little proof increased pena






ancient humans didn't turn to cannibalism for the calories


illustration: jim cooke/gimzodohumans have been eating other humans since the beginning of time, but the motivations behind this macabre practice are complex and often unclear. some anthropologists say prehistoric cannibals were just trying to grab a nutritious snack, but new research shows that human flesh—as tasty as it is—doesn’t pack the same caloric punch as wild animals. in other words, cannibalism wasn’t worth the trouble given alternatives. advertisementa new study published in scientific reports is the first to provide a caloric breakdown of the human body—from tip to toe and all the scrumptious parts in between—to assess the motivations of prehistoric cannibals. the sole author of the study, archaeologist james cole from the university brighton, used this data to compare the calo






ancient humans didn't turn to cannibalism for the calories


illustration: jim cooke/gizmodohumans have been eating other humans since the beginning of time, but the motivations behind this macabre practice are complex and often unclear. some anthropologists say prehistoric cannibals were just trying to grab a nutritious snack, but new research shows that human flesh—as tasty as it is—doesn’t pack the same caloric punch as wild animals. in other words, cannibalism wasn’t worth the trouble given alternatives. advertisementa new study published in scientific reports is the first to provide a caloric breakdown of the human body—from tip to toe and all the scrumptious parts in between—to assess the motivations of prehistoric cannibals. the sole author of the study, archaeologist james cole from the university brighton, used this data to compare the calo






one in five patients regularly miss gp appointments


image copyrightmagnum photosup to one in five patients are regularly missing gp appointments in scotland, with younger people the worst offenders, new research has found.a study of more than 500,000 people in the country, published in the journal the lancet public health, shows young males are most likely to not attend.in 2014, nhs england estimated that more than 12 million gp visits are missed each year in the uk.that could cost the health service in excess of £162m per year. perhaps surprisingly there is no centrally collected data on either the total number of gp appointments or how many of them are missed. but the new study revealed that 19% of patients - roughly one in five - missed more than two appointments over a three-year period. younger, male patients aged 16 to 30 were found t






one in five patients regularly miss gp appointments


image copyrightmagnum photosup to one in five patients are regularly missing gp appointments in scotland, with younger people the worst offenders, new research has found.a study of more than 500,000 people in the country, published in the journal the lancet public health, shows young males are most likely to not attend.in 2014, nhs england estimated that more than 12 million gp visits are missed each year in the uk.that could cost the health service in excess of £162m per year. perhaps surprisingly there is no centrally collected data on either the total number of gp appointments or how many of them are missed. but the new study revealed that 19% of patients - roughly one in five - missed more than two appointments over a three-year period. younger, male patients aged 16 to 30 were found t






apes can tell when humans are wrong


great apes, including chimpanzees, orangutans and bonobos, might be able to tell when humans are wrong, according to researchers. in a study published wednesday in the journal plos one, researchers revealed experiments in which great apes helped humans when witnessed them making an incorrect decision. researchers at the max planck institute for evolutionary anthropology in germany…






report shows computer delays in child grooming inquiries


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption a study said greater manchester police face a "major challenge" in dealing with internet-based child sex offenders police can face a backlog of up to five months to analyse computers linked to suspected paedophiles, a report has found.mp ann coffey highlighted the delays as part of a study into child sexual exploitation in greater manchester.the report found the number of "known or suspected" child sex offenders in the region had risen to 1,139, double the number recorded in 2014.police in the region investigated 9,035 reported offences since 2013, it said.the report, entitled "real voices, are they being heard?" is a follow-up to a 2014 study commissioned to assess improvements in protecting youngsters after nine men were jailed in 2012 for running






report shows computer delays in child grooming inquiries


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption a study said greater manchester police face a "major challenge" in dealing with internet-based child sex offenders police can face a backlog of up to five months to analyse computers linked to suspected paedophiles, a report has found.mp ann coffey highlighted the delays as part of a study into child sexual exploitation in greater manchester.the report found the number of "known or suspected" child sex offenders in the region had risen to 1,139, double the number recorded in 2014.police in the region investigated 9,035 reported offences since 2013, it said.the report, entitled "real voices, are they being heard?" is a follow-up to a 2014 study commissioned to assess improvements in protecting youngsters after nine men were jailed in 2012 for running






to make people work better with robots, make the robots imperfect


what does it take to make robots more welcome in the workplace? the answer may be programming them to make mistakes.researchers in austria conducted a study recently in which interactions between robots and human co-workers were examined in a simulated workplace. when some of the robots made mistakes—something they were programmed to do—the robot-human interactions observed were more positive than in sessions where the robots did their jobs perfectly.“people who interacted with the faulty robots liked them more,” says nicole mirnig, a research fellow at the university of salzburg’s center for human-computer interaction, and one of six researchers on the study published in frontiers in robotics and ai.journal reportmore in c-suite strategiesthe researchers programmed nao robots from japan’s






cats domesticated themselves / boing boing


in many, animal species are domesticated when humans bring them into their homes whether they want to be there or not. for example, it's mostly accepted that humans domesticated wolves, breeding them in captivity until they became the modern dogs we love today. now, a new study of cat genetics reveals that cats just kind of hung around humans for thousands of years before they were domesticated. from casey smith's article in national geographic: the earlier ancestors of today’s domestic cats spread from southwest asia and into europe as early as 4400 b.c. the cats likely started hanging around farming communities in the fertile crescent about 8,000 years ago, where they settled into a mutually beneficial relationship as humans’ rodent patrol. mice and rats were attracted to crops and other






da receives a $480k grant to aid in domestic violence prevention, victim protect


the district attorney’s office received a federal grant worth more than $484,000 that it will use to research domestic violence prevention and to help protect victims, county authorities announced thursday.the grant, from the u.s. department of justice, is part of the federal government’s smart prosecution initiative, which uses “data and research to identify and prevent repeat domestic violence,” according to a news release from district attorney summer stephan.about 17,000 domestic violence incidents are reported to law enforcement agencies around the county each year.under the terms of the grant, the da’s family protection division is partnering with deborah l. wiesel, a criminal justice researcher from north carolina central university, to work on awareness and education projects aimed






justices decline to extend ruling on repeat offenders


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supreme court strikes law banning sex offenders from much of internet


in packingham v. north carolina, the supreme court took up the thorny problem of how to deal with sex offenders after they have served their time and been released from prison. in a unanimous opinion tuesday, they ruled that however justified a state may be in protecting potential future victims from recidivist offenders, those justifications do not override the protections all americans have under the first amendment. the court left open the debate as to what other means governments may use to protect children from sex offenders deemed likely to repeat their crimes.why we have a bill of rightsfree speech is one of those civic ideals that everyone agrees to in theory. in practice, when the speech (or the speaker) is particularly offensive, many are tempted to cast aside the liberties that






duluth judge adds personal touch to help repeat dwi offenders


duluth – the judge greets the defendants strolling into his courtroom cheerfully, as he does each friday afternoon. mingling casually among them in the gallery, no black robe to be seen, the honorable shaun floerke gives each a warm smile.“how are the kids?” he asks. “what grade does zoe start?”“how’s your summer?” he inquires of another, shaking hands.floerke has served on the bench in the 6th judicial district for 13 years. but on friday afternoons in south st. louis county dwi court, he seems anything but judgmental. from the moment repeat drunken-driving offenders walk into floerke’s courtroom, they can tell they are in for something different.instead of stern punishment and shaming, defendants gather in a group surrounded by a culture of understanding. the judge and staff aim to act a






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download download app certified by teachers of the educational app store. 6 times 8 is 48, 9 times 7 is 63, listen and answer to the question. and repeat, repeat, repeat. the oldest and more effective way to learn times table is now available on android. talking times table uses the options given by android smartphones and tablets to ask questions vocally and listen to the answers: learning times table has never been so fun. thanks to the vocal interaction your kids will quickly learn times table comfortably lying on the sofa or in the car while going to school. the app will be their own personal trainer: first it explains and then asks questions. they just need to listen to the questions and answer. the app will count mistakes in order to ask the less know times table more frequently: thi






schools face vexing test: which kids will sexually attack?


the children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. there is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate.thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression in the united states, yet experts see no standard profile of personality, background or motivation.they say that while anti-social behavior can suggest a greater risk of offending, the cool kid may attack and the rebel may reform. the reasons are rarely as straightforward as physical gratification and range from a sense of entitlement to desperation to fit in.though many sexual assaults aren't reported to authorities, research shows that about 95 percent of juvenile offenders who enter the justic






schools face vexing test: which kids will sexually attack?


the children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. there is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate.thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression in the united states, yet experts see no standard profile of personality, background or motivation.they say that while anti-social behavior can suggest a greater risk of offending, the cool kid may attack and the rebel may reform. the reasons are rarely as straightforward as physical gratification and range from a sense of entitlement to desperation to fit in.though many sexual assaults aren't reported to authorities, research shows that about 95 percent of juvenile offenders who enter the justic






desperate polar bears may attack more people as arctic ice melts


humans might see more attacks from polar bears as the arctic environment changes, because these bears may turn to preying on people as their food sources dwindle. with trends of arctic ice melting and polar bear habitats shrinking amid climate changes, researchers collected and analyzed data of polar bear attacks on humans to predict how the…






schools struggle with what to do with kids who sexually attack


by justin pritchard and reese dunklinthe children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. there is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate.thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression in the united states, yet experts see no standard profile of personality, background or motivation.they say that while anti-social behavior can suggest a greater risk of offending, the cool kid may attack and the rebel may reform. the reasons are rarely as straightforward as physical gratification and range from a sense of entitlement to desperation to fit in.though many sexual assaults aren’t reported to authorities, research shows that about 95 percent of ju






schools face vexing test: which kids will sexually attack?


the children who sexually assault other children may be the popular jocks, the loners or anyone in between. there is no typical attacker, no way for schools to predict who might inflict that kind of torment on a classmate.thousands of school-age offenders are treated annually for sexual aggression in the united states, yet experts see no standard profile of personality, background or motivation.they say that while anti-social behavior can suggest a greater risk of offending, the cool kid may attack and the rebel may reform. the reasons are rarely as straightforward as physical gratification and range from a sense of entitlement to desperation to fit in.though many sexual assaults aren’t reported to authorities, research shows that about 95 percent of juvenile offenders who enter the justic






software industry growth far outpaces u.s. economy, hits $1.14 trillion


software may actually be eating the world, as inventor/entrepreneur marc andreessen famously said, but it’s also elbowing its way into more prominence within the u.s. overall economy.despite ongoing discussions about the slow, tedious pace of growth in the u.s. economy, software’s economic impact is surging, according to a new study released by software.org.  the software development and distribution industry is adding a whopping $1.14 trillion to the nation’s business overall; it also is supporting more than 10 million jobs and bolstering the economy in all 50 states. as evidence, new and relatively new centers of software development have grown outside silicon valley and boston/cambridge in disparate places such as portland, los angeles, minneapolis, indianapolis, salt lake city and seve






bots on wikipedia wage edit wars between themselves that last for years


image: wikipediarevision wars on wikipedia amongst human editors is an all-too-common occurrence, but new research from the uk shows that similar online battles are being waged between the site’s software robots. as a new study published in plos one reveals, wikipedia’s bots don’t always get along, frequently undoing each other’s edits. these online algorithms, each equipped with their own instructions and goals, engage in sterile “fights” over content that can persist for years. the new research shows how relatively “dumb” bots can produce complex interactions and behaviors, and how developers need to stay on top of their digital creations. this has implications not just for the quality of wikipedia pages, but for the development of ai in general—particularly any autonomous agents set loo






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southampton knocks liverpool out of efl cup on shane long’s late strike | liverp


by marcus kwesi o'mard on wed, jan 25, 2017 at 5:14pm1,093share this:liverpool’s hopes of reaching the efl cup final for a second consecutive season are over after the reds were beaten 1-0 by southampton on wednesday at anfield, exiting the competition 2-0 on aggregate.half-time substitute shane long grabbed the only goal of the game in stoppage-time, blasting beyond loris karius at the end of the visitors’ speedy counter-attack.prior to that, the reds had been unable to find their way through the saints, who book a berth in next month’s final at wembley stadium.claude puel’s side had fashioned earlier opportunities to add to the 1-0 lead it secured in the first leg, while the hosts were unable to make heavy second-half pressure tell, with emre can and daniel sturridge coming closest to f