Candlelites

Everything from Everywhere

spivack said - Search

spivack said Searched between all the resources and sites across the web. To view the full text news click on the links searched. All links are displayed with the source site.



the most interesting thing shot into space last week wasn't a tesla


there was a second payload on board the spacex falcon heavy that launched tuesday (feb. 6), and (unlike the tesla roadster) it's built to last 14 billion years. spacex confirmed during its pre-launch livestream that the gadget, called an arch, is tucked away somewhere inside the red tesla roadster now floating through space. it's a simple-looking object: a clear, thick disk of quartz crystal, about an inch across, with lettering across its face. it could almost be a small business award — best car dealership maybe, or top pizza restaurant — except for the data etched microscopically into its body with powerful, high-frequency lasers. and that data, or at least the future suggested by that data, is what earned the arch a ride aboard the roadster. [interstellar space travel: 7 futuristic spa






the case of the mac that self-plays youtube videos


jeff spivack writes in a story of terror: my macbook pro (running el capitan) woke us up at 6:30 this morning. it was playing youtube videos all by itself. i don’t think anyone had been using the computer in the past 24-36 hours, but i do leave it on and awake all of the time. when we had gone to bed, there were no youtube videos playing. jeff says the video was playing in a safari window, and he checked by holding down the back on to see how many videos it had gone through—he found at least 20 urls in the list! he selected the oldest item, and got an error at youtube that the video didn’t exist, and that page didn’t appear in the history. “is my mac possessed?” asks jeff. i have a few suspicions about what happened, and it’s not your fault. youtube added a “feature” around early 2015






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal)richard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members of the public request information






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal) 19622 connect 1 linkedinemailmorerichard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal) 19624 connect 1 linkedinemailmorerichard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members






how states keep accident-prone roads secret


richard boltuck, an economist who lives in bethesda, maryland, stands near his home at a makeshift memorial for three family members who were killed in february at the accident-prone intersection. boltuck has been lobbying the state for information about the intersection's dangers for eight years.(p o: stephen r. herm, for reveal) 19623 connect 1 linkedinemailmorerichard boltuck did not plan to spend most of his waking hours fighting with public officials. he just wanted the state to install a left-turn traffic light at an accident-prone intersection near his home in bethesda, maryland.this request would drag on for more than eight years, and place boltuck, an economist, squarely in the center of a national debate over just how transparent state and local governments should be when members