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southern states join to promote civil rights tourism


birmingham, ala. — southern states are banding together to promote civil rights tourism across the region.fourteen states including all of the deep south are joining to promote the u.s. civil rights trail. it's a tourism website and campaign that will highlight about 130 sites linked to the modern civil rights movement.the joint effort is being unveiled as part of the mlk holiday weekend.individual southern states have used such promotions for years. but alabama tourism director lee sentell says the states have never before joined together in a single push to bolster civil rights tourism.most states participating in the promotion are part of travel south usa, which is funded by state tourism agencies. the organization has launched civilrightstrail.com and is placing advertisements to promo






iconic civil rights activist frankie muse freeman dies at 101


she was the first woman to be appointed to the united states commission on civil rights.        






georgia debates confederate pride and slavery


civil rights leaders in georgia are fighting an effort to recognize “confederate history month,” arguing that doing so would gloss over the u.s. history of slavery. the proposal seeks to honor confederate states that engaged in a “four-year struggle for states’ rights.” state republican rep. tommy benton of jefferson said his bill would honor southern heritage…






obama’s top civil rights lawyer to lead advocacy coalition


washington (ap) — the obama administration’s top civil rights lawyer will lead a coalition of civil and human rights organizations at a time when they fear the justice department will soften its stance on criminal justice reform.vanita gupta led the obama justice department’s civil rights division. she said on thursday she will become the new president and ceo of the leadership conference on civil and human rights. she says she joins the organization amid an “unprecedented assault on civil rights,” as attorney general jeff sessions has indicated the department will soften its focus on protecting voter rights and monitoring troubled police departments.gupta is a former attorney with the american civil liberties union. she’ll start her new position june 1.






confederate flags weren’t part of ‘southern pride’ until the civil rights moveme


according to a new washington post article, the argument that confederate flags are a symbol of “southern pride” is complicated by a historical analysis that shows they weren’t widely-flown until the rise of the civil rights movement.based on a close reading of historical instances of the southern “battle flag,” political scientists logan strother, thomas ogorzalek and spencer piston found that the flag wasn’t a regular part of southern symbology until 1948. that year, former south carolina sen. strom thurmond (d-sc) led a walkout of southern democrats at the democratic national convention in protest of then-president harry truman’s civil rights policy, and it became known as the “dixecrat revolt.” after the walkout, the dixiecrats began to use the confederate flag.soon after, “the flag be






trump’s civil rights division will be headed by staffer who railed against civil


the trump administration has quietly appointed a heritage foundation staffer who has railed against civil rights protections for transgender patients as director of the federal agency charged with protecting the civil rights of all patients. though the administration did not issue a formal announcement, roger severino is now listed on the website of the u.s. department…






oregon tourism commission download


download download did you know the or tourism app is the best way to stay connected in the oregon tourism industry? share information with industry peers through interactive features and live updates. network with industry leaders. post to event feeds. participate in live polls. play in-app games. and so much morewhether you're connecting at the oregon governor's conference on tourism, recapping a recent trip or strengthening ties with oregon tourism industry partners, the or tourism app will keep you organized and informed.






these are the best and worst states to live in, according to new report


massachusetts, home to a host of schools including harvard university, came in at no. 1 on the best states report.(photo: cj gunther, epa) 92 connectlinkedinemailmoreno southern states made it into u.s. news & world report top 10 best states report, released tuesday.the report is weighted to reflect what citizens say they value most in their states: health care and education are most important; infrastructure, crime and corrections, opportunity, economy and government are also factors. in total, all 50 states are measured against 68 metrics across those seven categories. u.s. news pulled data from a variety of sources, including mckinsey & company’s leading states index.new england states claimed three of the top 10 spots. massachusetts topped the list because of its educated population an






these are the best and worst states to live in, according to new report


massachusetts, home to a host of schools including harvard university, came in at no. 1 on the best states report.(photo: cj gunther, epa) 5063 connect 1 linkedinemailmoreno southern states made it into u.s. news & world report top 10 best states report, released tuesday.the report is weighted to reflect what citizens say they value most in their states: health care and education are most important; infrastructure, crime and corrections, opportunity, economy and government are also factors. in total, all 50 states are measured against 68 metrics across those seven categories. u.s. news pulled data from a variety of sources, including mckinsey & company’s leading states index.new england states claimed three of the top 10 spots. massachusetts topped the list because of its educated populati






these are the best and worst states to live in, according to new report


massachusetts, home to a host of schools including harvard university, came in at no. 1 on the best states report.(photo: cj gunther, epa) 8034 connect 1 linkedinemailmoreno southern states made it into u.s. news & world report top 10 best states report, released tuesday.the report is weighted to reflect what citizens say they value most in their states: health care and education are most important; infrastructure, crime and corrections, opportunity, economy and government are also factors. in total, all 50 states are measured against 68 metrics across those seven categories. u.s. news pulled data from a variety of sources, including mckinsey & company’s leading states index.new england states claimed three of the top 10 spots. massachusetts topped the list because of its educated populati






these are the best and worst states to live in, according to new report


massachusetts, home to a host of schools including harvard university, came in at no. 1 on the best states report.(photo: cj gunther, epa) 2424 connectlinkedinemailmoreno southern states made it into u.s. news & world report top 10 best states report, released tuesday.the report is weighted to reflect what citizens say they value most in their states: health care and education are most important; infrastructure, crime and corrections, opportunity, economy and government are also factors. in total, all 50 states are measured against 68 metrics across those seven categories. u.s. news pulled data from a variety of sources, including mckinsey & company’s leading states index.new england states claimed three of the top 10 spots. massachusetts topped the list because of its educated population






'mr. president, we don’t need you in mississippi.' protesters gather as trump sp


president trump made a brief visit to mississippi’s capital on saturday to attend the opening of a new civil rights museum as his presence sparked a boycott by lawmakers, civil rights icons and protesters who questioned his commitment to racial equality.“trump does not care about human rights! much less: civil rights!” and “make america civil again” read some signs as about 200 protesters gathered outside the mississippi civil rights museum in downtown jackson.the building, which along with a companion state history museum opened at a cost $90 million, is the first state-owned civil rights museum in the nation. it launched as americans grapple with growing racial divisions that many activists blame trump for fueling.its kickoff, which had the support of a broad coalition of civil rights ve






without concealed-carry reciprocity, self-defense is second-class right


when civil rights advocates on the left speak of the bill of rights, they are generally not referring to all ten amendments. the ninth and tenth are frequently forgotten or dismissed as tautologies. the second amendment, especially, gets ignored altogether.this is not just a matter of what legal cases groups like the american civil liberties union will take up. it also trickles down into the general understanding of our rights as americans.while rights like free speech, free religion, and the right against self-incrimination are perceived, left and right, as the universal rights of all americans, the right to keep and bear arms is idiosyncratically dismissed as a matter for local determination. that view is increasingly out of step with a nation that believes civil rights should not be dif






arkansas ends robert e. lee-martin luther king jr. holiday


little rock, ark. (ap) — arkansas’ governor signed legislation tuesday ending the state’s practice of commemorating confederate gen. robert e. lee on the same holiday as slain civil rights leader martin luther king jr., leaving only two states remaining that honor the two men on the same day.republican gov. asa hutchinson championed the bill, which also expands what is taught in schools about civil rights and the civil war, saying it would unify the state and improve its image. his signature comes two years after similar efforts repeatedly failed before a legislative panel, with critics saying it belittles the state’s confederate heritage.here are some details about the new law and background about the original duel-holiday:___most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 for 4 weeks.what






arkansas ends robert e. lee-martin luther king jr. holiday


little rock, ark. — arkansas' governor signed legislation tuesday ending the state's practice of commemorating confederate gen. robert e. lee on the same holiday as slain civil rights leader martin luther king jr., leaving only two states remaining that honor the two men on the same day.republican gov. asa hutchinson championed the bill, which also expands what is taught in schools about civil rights and the civil war, saying it would unify the state and improve its image. his signature comes two years after similar efforts repeatedly failed before a legislative panel, with critics saying it belittles the state's confederate heritage.here are some details about the new law and background about the original duel-holiday:___what does the law do?the new law will remove lee from the state holi






civil rights veteran on mississippi museums: 'i felt the bullets. i felt th


joan trumpauer mulholland, a freedom rider, called the new civil rights museum “amazing. never did i dream that i would see a mississippi civil rights museum.”        






trump draws protests while honoring civil rights heroes


jackson, miss. — president donald trump has honored figures of civil rights movement, some famous, some not.but his tour of the new mississippi civil rights museum and adjacent museum of mississippi in jackson drew protests saturday. at issue is a debate over his commitment to the legacy of the civil rights movement.rep. john lewis, a leader of the civil rights movement, called trump's visit an insult. the white house accused lewis and others of injecting politics into a moment that could have brought people together.trump spent about 30 minutes at the museums, gave a 10-minute speech to select guests inside and flew back to his florida estate, skipping the public schedule for the dedication ceremony held outside.






manga, mario and now ninja: japan's hopes for wooing tourism


tokyo — japan is turning to those hooded samurai-era acrobatic spies known as ninja to woo tourism.the japan ninja council, a government-backed organization of scholars, tourism groups and businesses, said wednesday that it's starting a ninja academy to train people in the art of ninja, and building a new museum in tokyo devoted to ninja, set to open in 2018.the council has created an official logo for certified products and movies to nurture what it called the "ninja business," and it hopes to educate "ninja ambassadors" to promote the culture globally.officials at the foreign correspondents' club of japan showed a ninja-inspired martial-arts demonstration and a guidebook in english highlighting several ninja-related places in japan, such as castles and a "ninja "village theme park.






two ancient tombs in egypt offer hope as tourism draw


egypt on saturday announced the discovery of two small ancient tombs in the southern city of luxor dating back some 3,500 years, hoping it will help the country’s efforts to revive ailing tourism.the tombs, located on the west bank of the nile river in a cemetery for noblemen and top officials, are the latest discovery in the city famed for its temples and tombs spanning different dynasties of ancient egyptian history. “it’s truly an exceptional day,” said antiquities minister khaled al-anani. “the 18th dynasty private tombs were already known. but it’s the first time to enter inside the two tombs.”al-anani said the discoveries are part of the ministry’s efforts to promote egypt’s vital tourism industry, partly driven by antiquities sightseeing, that was hit hard by terrorist attacks and p






aclu is seeing a trump-era surge in members and donations


new york — the american civil liberties union says it is suddenly awash in donations and new members as it does battle with president donald trump over the extent of his constitutional authority.the nearly century-old organization says membership has more than doubled since the election to nearly 1.2 million, and almost $80 million in online contributions have poured in.that includes a record $24 million surge over two days after trump banned people from seven predominantly muslim countries from entering the united states.the boost to the aclu's $220 million budget will allow it to spend more on its state operations. the organization says that became critical after some legislatures took trump's election as a license to promote anti-immigrant, anti-civil rights and anti-abortion legislatio






john kelly: us civil war caused by 'lack of compromise'


image copyrightdrew angerer/getty imagespresident trump's chief of staff, general john kelly, claims an inability to compromise caused the american civil war.speaking to fox news, gen kelly was discussing efforts to remove confederate monuments and symbols.confederate symbols have been a source of controversy in the us. some see them as an offensive reminder of america's history of slavery while others view their removal as an effort to subvert us history and southern culture.his remarks prompted a furious discussion on social media. the phrase "civil war" was trending in the us - used more than 30,000 times on twitter since mr kelly made his remarks on monday night.chelsea clinton and bernice king, daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king, were among those to voice their opposit






john kelly: us civil war caused by 'lack of compromise'


image copyrightdrew angerer/getty imagespresident trump's chief of staff, general john kelly, claims an inability to compromise caused the american civil war.speaking to fox news, gen kelly was discussing efforts to remove confederate monuments and symbols.confederate symbols have been a source of controversy in the us. some see them as an offensive reminder of america's history of slavery while others view their removal as an effort to subvert us history and southern culture.his remarks prompted a furious discussion on social media. the phrase "civil war" was trending in the us - used more than 30,000 times on twitter since mr kelly made his remarks on monday night.chelsea clinton and bernice king, daughter of civil rights leader martin luther king, were among those to voice their opposit






tourism campaigns: the high flyers & the backfires


cities, states, and countries spend big bucks on tourism campaigns, so it pays to learn from the best (and worst) of them.take notes as this infographic from just the flight flies you through the highs and lows of selling the travel experience.via just the flight.travelinfographics. posted by kate rinsema






trump has a question about the american civil war: ‘why could that one not have


the u.s. president had a historical question: why did america’s civil war happen? “why could that one not have been worked out?”remarks by donald trump, aired monday, showed presidential uncertainty about the origin and necessity of the civil war, a defining event in u.s. history with slavery at its core. trump also declared that president andrew jackson was angry about “what was happening” with regard to the war, which started 16 years after his death, and could have stopped it if still in office.trump, who has at times shown a shaky grasp of u.s. history, questioned why issues couldn’t have been settled to prevent the war that followed the secession of 11 southern states from the union and brought death to more than 600,000 americans, north and south.“people don’t realize, you know, the






trump on civil war: why couldn't they have worked that out?


new york — the u.s. president had a historical question: why did america's civil war happen? "why could that one not have been worked out?"remarks by donald trump, aired monday, showed presidential uncertainty about the origin and necessity of the civil war, a defining event in u.s. history with slavery at its core. trump also declared that president andrew jackson was angry about "what was happening" with regard to the war, which started 16 years after his death, and could have stopped it if still in office.trump, who has at times shown a shaky grasp of u.s. history, questioned why issues couldn't have been settled to prevent the war that followed the secession of 11 southern states from the union and brought death to more than 600,000 americans, north and south."people don't realize, you






trump asks why american civil war couldn't have been avoided


new york — the u.s. president had a historical question: why did america's civil war happen? "why could that one not have been worked out?"remarks by donald trump, aired monday, showed presidential uncertainty about the origin and necessity of the civil war, a defining event in u.s. history with slavery at its core. trump also declared that president andrew jackson was angry about "what was happening" with regard to the war, which started 16 years after his death, and could have stopped it if still in office.trump, who has at times shown a shaky grasp of u.s. history, questioned why issues couldn't have been settled to prevent the war that followed the secession of 11 southern states from the union and brought death to more than 600,000 americans, north and south."people don't realize, you






democratic senators condemn betsy devos for scaling back civil rights enforcemen


in a letter sent today, more than 30 democratic senators rebuked education secretary betsy devos for scaling back civil rights enforcement at the department of education. “you claim to support civil rights and oppose discrimination, but your actions belie your assurances,” wrote the senators, who said that the secretary’s recent moves to curtail civil rights efforts…






how a federal court ruling could be a ‘big moment’ for lgbtq rights – the denver


by amber phillips, the washington postas of tuesday evening, if someone is fired in the united states for being gay (which there are no laws against in more than half the states), they can now file a discrimination lawsuit and reasonably expect it to succeed.that’s because a federal appeals court in chicago ruled tuesday that the 1964 civil rights act means workers can’t be fired based on their sexual orientation. it’s not the first court to decide this, but it is the highest.lgbt advocates expect that sooner or later, the question of whether u.s. civil rights law applies to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people will reach the u.s. supreme court, which has the power to overturn a patchwork of nondiscrimination laws (or lack thereof) in 50 states, just like it did when it legalized






civil rights leaders to meet atty. gen. jeff sessions on tuesday


leaders from some of the country's most prominent civil rights organizations, many of which have been critical of the trump administration's record on civil rights, plan to meet tuesday with atty. gen. jeff sessions. the group includes the leadership conference on civil and human rights president wade henderson, national urban league president marc morial, lawyers’ committee for civil rights under law president kristen clarke, national action network president rev. al sharpton, naacp legal defense and educational fund president sherrilyn ifill, and national coalition on black civic participation president melanie l. campbell. according to a news release from the leadership conference on civil and human rights, an umbrella group, the civil rights leaders plan to "express grave concern for s






louisiana lieutenant governor in france to promote tourism


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trump makes puzzling claim about andrew jackson, civil war


the u.s. president had a historical question: why did america's civil war happen? "why could that one not have been worked out?"remarks by donald trump, aired monday, showed presidential uncertainty about the origin and necessity of the civil war, a defining event in u.s. history with slavery at its core. trump also declared that president andrew jackson was angry about "what was happening" with regard to the war, which started 16 years after his death, and could have stopped it if still in office.trump, who has at times shown a shaky grasp of u.s. history, questioned why issues couldn't have been settled to prevent the war that followed the secession of 11 southern states from the union and brought death to more than 600,000 americans, north and south."people don't realize, you know, the






'donald trump's civil war' by ken burns


"i mean, had andrew jackson been a little later, you wouldn't have had the civil war. he was a very tough person, but he had a big heart. he was really angry that he saw what was happening with regard to the civil war, he said, 'there's no reason for this.' people don't realize, you know, the civil war, if you think about it, why? people don't ask that question, but why was there the civil war? why could that one not have been worked out?" — donald trumpnarrator: the civil war, if you think about it, why?sad fiddle music begins to play.(a series of clips: troops walking ashore on d-day, an engraving of the boston massacre, fort sumter with "you're fired" on it.)jeff sessions: (long silence) well, there is one thing we know about the civil war, and that is: a lot of people don't approve of






travel ban, strong dollar seen putting damper on us tourism sector


travel and tourism’s contribution to the u.s. economy will grow at a slower pace this year than in 2016 due to a strong u.s. dollar and a perception that the country is less welcoming to foreigners, the world travel and tourism council (wttc) said.u.s. president donald trump earlier this month signed a revised executive order banning citizens from six muslim-majority nations from traveling to the united states, which some have warned could deter visitors.those countries account for a tiny percentage of visitors to the united states, but there is growing concern that the order could hurt the country’s image and scare other tourists away.“the travel ban is not having a material impact yet. but we are seeing the unintended consequences of this now because the message has gone around the world






trans activists want to destroy this appointee for not being a radical


twelve democratic senators are trying to thwart a highly regarded civil rights attorney in his position at the health and human services department because of his work on religious liberty issues. roger severino served as a trial attorney in the department of justice’s civil rights division for seven years during the obama administration. he also worked for a brief time on religious civil liberties at the becket fund for religious liberty and the heritage foundation’s devos center for religion and civil society.yet in a threatening letter to hhs secretary thomas price, the senators claim to be “deeply troubled” by his hiring, alleging, without any evidence, “a long history of making bigoted statements toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and attacking women’s access to hea






why a civil rights icon chose to tell his story in the form of a comic book


a packed house greeted civil rights icon rep. john lewis and his co-authors of the "march" trilogy, andrew aydin and nate powell, at bovard auditorium on saturday afternoon.their graphic novel "march: book three," which is based on lewis' life, is a finalist for a los angeles times book prize in young adult literature.so, why a comic book?aydin, who works as lewis' digital director and policy advisor, grew up reading comic books and felt that the medium was an effective way to bring a new generation into lewis' story."when you're a kid and you don't have much to see in terms of good people ... when you finally meet one and work for one, you know you have to do something special to tell his story," aydin said.a young john lewis is seen in the foreground being clubbed by a state trooper duri






devos' civil rights office appointee opposes civil rights / boing boing


candice jackson, betsy devos' appointee to help lead the department of education's office of civil rights, opposes affirmative action and claims to herself have been victimized by 'anti-white discrimination.'candice jackson was tapped to serve as the deputy assistant secretary for the office of civil rights, a position that does not require senate confirmation. but she will serve as the interim head of the office until the assistant secretary has been named. at the office, jackson will be charged with helping protect students from discrimination. she once recounted her experience in a class at stanford university in the 1990s, where she was an undergraduate student, in a piece for the stanford review. she complained that she was unable to join a section of a math class that offered minorit






why a civil rights icon chose to tell his story in the form of a comic book


a packed house greeted civil rights icon rep. john lewis and his co-authors of the "march" trilogy, andrew aydin and nate powell, at bovard auditorium saturday afternoon.their graphic novel "march: book three," which is based on lewis' life, is a finalist for a los angeles times book prize in young adult literature.so, why a comic book?aydin, who works as lewis' digital director and policy advisor, grew up reading comic books and felt that the medium was an effective way to bring a new generation into lewis' story."when you're a kid and you don't have much to see in terms of good people ... when you finally meet one and work for one, you know you have to do something special to tell his story," aydin said.a young john lewis is seen in the foreground being clubbed by a state trooper during