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sidi bouzid: hardship bites where arab spring began | news


sidi bouzid, tunisia - akram hamdi says he has sent out nearly three dozen resumes. but the 25-year-old is still unemployed, nearly two years after he graduated with a bachelor's degree in business economics from the university of sfax, on the tunisian coast."it destroys me psychologically," hamdi told al jazeera from a dimly lit cafe in sidi bouzid, where at 1:30 in the afternoon, he was having a coffee alongside two friends.of the three young men, only one currently has a steady job."the situation since the revolution is worsening. [the government] destroyed us, they destroyed the country," hamdi said.this is where the tunisian revolution began, when 26-year-old fruit vendor mohamed bouazizi set himself alight in protest against the harassment and indignities he faced daily.his act of de






tunisia rallies simmer before arab spring anniversary | news


hundreds of people clashed with police, blocked roads and burned tires overnight in a northern tunisian city, with more protests expected before january 14 - the anniversary marking the removal of zine el abidine ben ali, the country's former president.at least eight security officers were injured in the coastal town of nabeul during clashes with young protesters late on tuesday, according to tunisia's press agency tap.tap reported that six government vehicles were also destroyed, while 23 people were arrested. in the neighbouring city of kelibia, an estimated 300 demonstrators fought with police, and some were accused of looting a shopping centre, tap also reported.individuals with "criminal records" infiltrated the protests in kelibia, in the nabeul governorate, tap said.at least five pe






tunisia rallies simmer before arab spring anniversary | news


hundreds of people clashed with police, blocked roads and burned tires overnight in a northern tunisian city, with more protests expected before january 14 - the anniversary marking the ouster of zine el abidine ben ali, the country's former president.at least eight security officers were injured in the coastal town of nabeul during clashes with young protestors late on tuesday, according to tunisia's press agency tap.tap reported that six government vehicles were also destroyed, while 23 persons were arrested. in the neighbouring city of kelibia, an estimated 300 demonstrators fought with police, and some were accused of looting a shopping centre, tap also reported.individuals with "criminal records" infiltrated the protests in kelibia, in the nabeul governorate, tap said.at least five pe






how to develop empathy by understanding subjective hardship


most people understand what hardship is but not a lot of people know how to develop empathy. when we think about someone who undergoes hardship, we often think about those who are impoverished, disabled or marginalized in some way. what we fail to think about is subjective hardship. what is subjective hardship? i define subjective […] the post how to develop empathy by understanding subjective hardship appeared first on dumb little man.






putin threatens protesters with stricter measures


moscow—russian president vladimir putin compared a recent wave of street demonstrations in russia to the first stirrings of the arab spring, warning on thursday that his government would deal harshly with unsanctioned protests.“this tool was used at the beginning of the so-called arab spring,” mr. putin said, referring to anticorruption protests held sunday in moscow and many other cities, russian news agencies reported. “we know...






leaders in the arab spring era: where are they now? | news


the killing of former yemeni president ali abdullah saleh by houthi rebels on monday marks the end of another arab leader deposed by the arab spring protests.saleh's death came after he announced the end of his cooperation with the houthis on saturday, in a move orchestrated by the united arab emirates, one of the key forces in the saudi-led coalition battling the houthis.{articleguid}the former president had ruled north yemen since 1978 before north and south yemen merged in 1990. saleh was then sworn in as president of a united yemen. he remained president until 2012 when he formally ceded power to abd-rabbu mansour hadi, the saudi-backed president currently fighting the houthis.saleh's resignation followed the yemeni revolution, which was part of the broader arab spring that took hold o






anti-austerity protests in tunisia turn deadly | news


a 55-year-old man has died after a protest over government austerity measures in tunisia, the country's state news agency tunis afrique presse (tap) has reported.five others were injured during the demonstration, which took place in tebourba, 40km west of the capital tunis, according to tap.the tunisian ministry of interior confirmed in a statement on monday evening that a 55-year-old man had died in a local hospital after being admitted with symptoms of dizziness.he suffered from "chronic shortness of breath" and showed "no signs of violence or [having been] run over", and a forensic doctor has been tasked with determining the cause of death, the statement said.speculation on social media throughout monday evening suggested that the man had died after being hit by a security forces vehicl






anti-austerity protests in tunisia turn deadly | news


a 55-year-old man has died after a protest over government austerity measures in tunisia, the country's state news agency tunis afrique presse (tap) has reported.five others were injured during the demonstration, which took place in tebourba, 40km west of the capital tunis, according to tap.the tunisian ministry of interior confirmed in a statement on monday evening that a 55-year-old man had died in a local hospital after being admitted with symptoms of dizziness.he suffered from a "chronic shortness of breath" and carried "no signs of violence or [having been] run over", and a forensic doctor has been tasked with determining the cause of death, the statement said.speculation on social media throughout monday evening suggested that the man had died after being hit by a security forces veh






qatar emir: our sovereignty is a red line | qatar news


sheikh tamim bin hamad al thani, the emir of qatar, has said he will not bow to pressure from a group of arab states blockading his country, calling the independence and sovereignty of the gulf nation a "red line"."our sovereignty is a red line. we don't accept anybody interfering our sovereignty," sheikh tamim told us television programme 60 minutes.saudi arabia, the uae, egypt and bahrain cut ties with qatar on june 5 and imposed a land, sea and air embargo, accusing it of supporting "terrorism". doha has repeatedly denied the allegation."they don't like our independence, the way how we are thinking, our vision for the region," he told host charlie rose in a wide-ranging interview that aired on sunday."we want freedom of speech for the people of the region and they're not happy with that






tips to prevent and treat bug bites | the global dispatch


share thistagsbeesbug bitesdeetdenguehealth newslyme diseasemalariamosquitoespreventing bug bitestickstreating bug biteszika virusalthough warm, spring weather means more time outdoors, it also means more bugs – like bees, ticks and mosquitoes. the best way to deal with pesky bites and stings, say dermatologists from the american academy of dermatology, is to prevent them in the first place. this can also help you avoid an insect-related disease, which can put a damper on anyone’s spring.image/aad“although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like zika virus, dengue, lyme disease and malaria,” said board-certified dermatologist lindsay strowd, md, faad, an assistant professor of dermatology at wake forest baptist medical center in winston-salem, north carolina. “






birmingham pitcher armando yanez is awarded a hardship waiver


left-hander armando yanez, a key figure in helping birmingham win the city section division i baseball championship, has been awarded a fifth year of athletic eligibility, clearing the way for him to pitch for the patriots this spring.he applied for a hardship waiver from the city section."we're excited to have him back," coach matt mowry said.at a minimum, you can expect lots of country music being played at birmingham games.yanez was known for breaking out his singing and dancing talents before pitching.






will the 2010s be the 'wasted decade' of arab hopes? | tunisia


at the turn of the 20th century, three ageing intellectuals with extensive knowledge of the middle east looked back at the previous hundred years and published their thoughts in a book entitled un siecle pour rien (a wasted century). revolutionary ideas, hopes and sacrifices did not produce anything but despair.assessing the arab world in the first decade following the arab spring, one is tempted to call it, similarly, the "wasted decade". but is it?in the early weeks of 2011, the "jasmine revolution" was reshaping tunisia. then when the revolutionary spirit spread to egypt and libya, the term "arab spring" was coined. the jasmine revolution quickly lost its momentum, being an orientalist concept more suitable for a disney movie than street politics. the "arab spring", as orientalist and c






who is to blame for the impasse in the gcc crisis? | middle east


it has been five months since the gulf diplomatic rift began and qatar's eemir says it is no closer to being resolved.sheikh tamim bin hamad al thani addressed qatar's advisory council on tuesday, saying saudi arabia, the united arab emirates, egypt and bahrain do not want to reach a solution.the arab quartet, as they are called, began a land, air and sea blockade on qatar in june.repeated attempts at mediation - by kuwait, the us, france and others - have all failed since then.so, what will it take to break the deadlock?presenter: adrian finighanguests:abdullah al shayji - former special adviser to the speaker of kuwait's parliamentimad harb - arab centre washington dcmajed al-ansari - professor of political sociology, qatar universitysource: al jazeera news






who is to blame for the impasse in the gcc crisis? | middle east


it has been five months since the gulf diplomatic rift began and qatar's eemir says it is no closer to being resolved.sheikh tamim bin hamad al thani addressed qatar's advisory council on tuesday, saying saudi arabia, the united arab emirates, egypt and bahrain do not want to reach a solution.the arab quartet, as they are called, began a land, air and sea blockade on qatar in june.repeated attempts at mediation - by kuwait, the us, france and others - have all failed since then.so, what will it take to break the deadlock?presenter: adrian finighanguests:abdullah al shayji, former special adviser to the speaker of kuwait's parliamentimad harb, arab centre washington dcmajed al-ansari, professor of political sociology, qatar universitysource: al jazeera news






tunisia forces kill fighters planning ramadan attack | tunisia news


a senior commander in an armed group blew himself up and another was shot dead during a raid by tunisian security forces on sunday.the men - suspected of having links with islamic state of iraq and levant (isil) and al-qaeda's north africa branch (aqim) - were planning attacks during the holy month of ramadan, according to a spokesman for tunisia's national guard.the raid took place in sidi bouzid, a town 200km southwest of the capital, tunis.another three people were detained and security forces were hunting for other suspects.the group had been under surveillance for weeks after communications about a possible attack were intercepted, national guard spokesman colonel-major khelifa chibani said. read more: tunisian pm chahed booed off stage in tataouine "national guard special forces kill






tunisia forces kill fighters planning ramadan attack | tunisia news


a senior commander in an armed group blew himself up and another was shot dead during a raid by tunisian security forces on sunday.the men - suspected of having links with islamic state of iraq and levant (isil) and al-qaeda's north africa branch (aqim) - were planning attacks during the holy month of ramadan, according to a spokesman for tunisia's national guard.the raid took place in sidi bouzid, a town 200km southwest of the capital, tunis.another three people were arrested and security forces were hunting for other suspects.the group had been under surveillance for weeks after communications about a possible attack were intercepted, national guard spokesman colonel-major khelifa chibani said. read more: tunisian pm chahed booed off stage in tataouine "national guard special forces kill






tips on treating & preventing bug bites


the season for all things outdoors is upon us, and that means the bugs are out, too.with serious diseases like zika on the rise, you may be wondering what the best way to prevent bug bites is, so give a listen to these recommendations from the academy of dermatology.full story at newswise.protect your health. posted by kate rinsema






what to do when you get a ton of mosquito bites


my dad likes to tell a story of a beach vacation my family went on when i was about five years old. we lived in north carolina and had gotten up super early to drive to the coast, which was about four hours away. as the story goes, my exhausted father looked over at me at some point and thought “wow, she’s started to get really hairy legs for a 5-year-old.” when he took a closer look; however, he realized that rather than hair, my legs were actually covered from top to bottom with mosquitos.we made a brisk exodus from the beach, my brother and i threw up in the car on the way home, and we never went on another family beach vacation again.mosquito bites are one of those things you get used to where i lived, and i did. every summer trip outdoors typically ended in at least a few bites, altho






what to do when you get a ton of mosquito bites


my dad likes to tell a story of a beach vacation my family went on when i was about five years old. we lived in north carolina and had gotten up super early to drive to the coast, which was about four hours away. as the story goes, my exhausted father looked over at me at some point and thought “wow, she’s started to get really hairy legs for a 5-year-old.” when he took a closer look; however, he realized that rather than hair, my legs were actually covered from top to bottom with mosquitos.we made a brisk exodus from the beach, my brother and i threw up in the car on the way home, and we never went on another family beach vacation again.mosquito bites are one of those things you get used to where i lived, and i did. every summer trip outdoors typically ended in at least a few bites, altho






models, politicians remember late designer alaia in tunisia


sidi bou said, tunisia — models, government ministers, relatives and friends have attended the funeral in tunisia of fashion designer azzedine alaia, a native of the north african country who won international acclaim.supermodel naomi campbell, who enjoyed a close relationship with alaia, appeared overwhelmed with emotion during the burial ceremony monday in sidi bou said, a picturesque village outside the capital, tunis."papa, papa," a sobbing campbell whispered as the influential designer's coffin was lowered.alaia dressed women as diverse as michelle obama, lady gaga, grace jones and greta garbo. he died saturday in paris, where he lived and worked for decades.model afef jnifen, who is from tunisia as well, also bid farewell to the secretive designer who tunisian president beji caid ess






6 things you didn't know about spring break | campus beat news for college stude


(photo: giphy)if spring break were a character, it would be regina george’s mom from mean girls. “i’m not a regular break. i’m a cool break,” it would say. unlike winter or fall vacations, full of apple crisp and family get-togethers, spring break is … hardcore.between march and april, students from around the united states flock to the tropics for a week of nonstop partying. the chaos, including increases in sexual assaults and drug and alcohol arrests, has led many popular spring break destinations to crack down on spring break debauchery.in may 2015, panama city beach voted to ban the consumption of alcohol on beaches throughout march. gulf shores imposed a similar ban in 2016 that will remain active during this year’s spring break season.how did we even get here? it actually turns out






young love, second chances and revolution: 7 books that feel like spring


in literature, spring isn’t just a time, it’s a symbol — of renewal and fresh starts, of surviving hardship, of budding love, of longing, of change.think of the beginning of kenneth grahame’s “the wind in the willows”: “spring was moving in the air above and in the earth below and around him, penetrating even his dark and lowly little house with its spirit of divine discontent and longing. … something up above was calling him.” and with that, mole tosses aside his whitewash bucket and bolts for the sun, and adventure.think of the ending of laura ingalls wilder’s “the long winter”: “and as they sang, the fear and the suffering of the long winter seemed to rise like a dark cloud and float away on the music. spring had come. the sun was shining warm, the winds were soft, and the green grass g






why women’s equality remains distant in the arab world


this article was originally published on the conversation. read the original article. the active role played by women in the arab spring of 2010-2011 was seen inside and outside the region as an example showing that a different kind of gender politics was possible, ushering in greater empowerment for women. however, as the uprisings were increasingly…






how to develop empathy by understanding subjective hardship


the easiest way to break down a barrier is to acknowledge. if someone you know seems a little off, say something.there are so many reasons why we experience pain in life. however, because we feel like no one will be able to understand the pain and what we are going through, we often hide them.that attitude is the barrier that we need to break down. other people will only be able to understand you if you let them in.showing vulnerability is the easiest way to get another person to open up to you. if i tell you about how my life is going and the struggles that i face, you will be more likely to open up to me. showing vulnerability is showing strength as it takes strength to admit when something is wrong.if we can break down the barriers and realize that people are just people, then we might






shark bites both legs of swimmer off south florida beach


lifeguards say they became aware of a shark lurking in the water and immediately began alerting bathers to get out






morocco food stampede kills 15 and wounds many


at least 15 people have been killed and several others wounded in a stampede in morocco while food aid was distributed.the incident occurred in the town of sidi boulaalam in essaouira province. the aid was being handed out by a private local charity.some reports indicate that up to 40 people were injured in the crush. local media reported that most of the victims were women and elderly people.pictures on social media showed bodies of women laid out on the ground.witnesses told local media that this year's annual food aid distribution at a local market in sidi boulaalam, an impoverished town with just over 8,000 inhabitants, attracted a larger crown that usual. "this year there were lots of people, several hundred people," a witness who asked to remain anonymous told afp news agency."people






morocco food stampede kills 15 and wounds many


at least 15 people have been killed and several others wounded in a stampede in morocco while food aid was distributed.the incident occurred in the town of sidi boulaalam in essaouira province. the aid was being handed out by a private local charity.some reports indicate that up to 40 people were injured in the crush. local media reported that most of the victims were women and elderly people.pictures on social media showed bodies of women laid out on the ground.witnesses told local media that this year's annual food aid distribution at a local market in sidi boulaalam, an impoverished town with just over 8,000 inhabitants, attracted a larger crowd than usual. "this year there were lots of people, several hundred people," a witness who asked to remain anonymous told afp news agency."people






in bloom at the arboretum


david joles – star tribunegallery: artist michael coyle of chanhassen works on his oil painting of a spring meadow blooming with crab apple blossoms. coyle began his painting in spring 2016 and hopes to finish soon. "spring is a short season," he said.






egypt roared as mubarak fell, now stands mute as he’s freed


former president hosni mubarak’s release, six years after he was toppled during the arab spring, capped a largely fruitless effort to hold him accountable for rights abuses and corruption.cairo — six years after roaring crowds ousted him at the peak of the arab spring, former president hosni mubarak of egypt was freed early friday from the cairo hospital where he had been detained, capping a long and largely fruitless effort to hold him accountable for human-rights abuses and corruption during his three decades of rule.mubarak, 88, was taken under armed escort from the maadi military hospital in southern cairo, where he had been living under guard in a room with a view of the nile, to his mansion in the upmarket suburb of heliopolis.“he went home at 8:30 this morning,” his longtime lawyer,






the guardian: attack on al jazeera must be resisted | qatar news


a demand by a group of arab countries to close al jazeera media network is "wrong", "ridiculous" and "must be resisted", the guardian newspaper has said in an editorial, joining a growing chorus of voices raising concerns about suppresion of press freedom in the gulf.saudi arabia, the united arab emirates, bahrain and egypt reportedly gave qatar 10 days to comply with 13 demands to end a major diplomatic crisisin the gulf, insisting, among others, that doha shut down al jazeera, close a turkish military base and scale down ties with iran.al jazeera: call for closure siege against journalism"the attack on al jazeera is part of an assault on free speech to subvert the impact of old and new media in the arab world. it should be condemned and resisted," the editorial published by the guardian






arab countries are cutting ties with qatar — and here’s why that is a big, big p


facebook, u.s. news, worldarab countries are cutting ties with qatar — and here’s why that is a big, big problemsarah k. burris05 jun 2017 at 15:15 etamid the thousands of news stories flooding the internet and airwaves on monday, five arab countries breaking ties with qatar may seem to pale in comparison to politicians using the n-word or british leaders attacking an american president. however, for those who care about terrorism beyond the sound bites, the news about isolating the country is a problem. the countries have all accused qatar of backing the muslim brotherhood, isis and al-qaeda and as such, have ordered the expulsion of diplomats and staff from their borders, foreign policyreported. the support for the muslim brotherhood seems to be what is behind egypt’s concern, as the gov






ousted egyptian leader freed after 6-year detention


cairo – six years after roaring crowds ousted him at the peak of the arab spring, former president hosni mubarak of egypt was freed on friday from the cairo hospital where he had been detained, capping a long and largely fruitless effort to hold him accountable for human rights abuses and endemic corruption during his three decades of rule.mubarak, 88, was taken from the maadi military hospital in southern cairo, where he had been living under guard, to his mansion in the suburb of heliopolis.the release begins a third act for a once unassailable arab ruler and u.s. ally who came to power in 1981 after the assassination of president anwar sadat. thirty years later, mubarak was ousted by multitudes who thronged tahrir square in the early months of the arab spring.at the time, mubarak's fall






qatar crisis raises questions about defining terrorism


dubai, united arab emirates — a diplomatic standoff between qatar and other arab nations that accuse it of sponsoring terrorism has turned a spotlight on an opaque network of charities and prominent figures freely operating in the tiny gulf country.but it also raises questions about who is considered a "terrorist" in the middle east.saudi arabia, the united arab emirates, egypt and bahrain have released a list of two dozen groups and nearly 60 individuals that they allege have been involved in financing terrorism and are linked to qatar.qatar insists it condemns terrorism and that it does not support extremist groups.the crisis began last month when the four arab countries cut ties to qatar.






the new new things that weren’t


we’re always looking for the new new thing in tech, since long before michael lewis coined the phrase. often we are entirely too successful. there are so many new new things — and so many of them fall from the sky like burned-out flares soon enough, to further litter the graveyard of old new things. can we learn from them? probably. will we learn from them? probably not. but it’s worth remembering them anyway, from time to time. and so i give you this highly idiosyncratic list of yesterday’s tomorrows from the twenty-teens:2010chatroulette was perhaps the most mayfly-ish of all the once-new things. it launched in november 2009. three months later it was a cultural event. three months after that its creator was the subject of a length new yorkerprofile. three months after that it shut down.






the new new things that weren’t


we’re always looking for the new new thing in tech, since long before michael lewis coined the phrase. often we are entirely too successful. there are so many new new things — and so many of them fall from the sky like burned-out flares soon enough, to further litter the graveyard of old new things. can we learn from them? probably. will we learn from them? probably not. but it’s worth remembering them anyway, from time to time. and so i give you this highly idiosyncratic list of yesterday’s tomorrows from the twenty-teens:2010chatroulette was perhaps the most mayfly-ish of all the once-new things. it launched in november 2009. three months later it was a cultural event. three months after that its creator was the subject of a length new yorkerprofile. three months after that it shut down.






emirati soldier killed serving in saudi-led war in yemen


dubai, united arab emirates — the united arab emirates says one of its soldiers has been killed while serving in the saudi-led war in yemen.a short military statement thursday on the state-run wam news agency announced the soldier's death, without offering a cause.the uae is one of saudi arabia's main allies in its war against yemen's shiite rebels, known as houthis.the war in yemen has killed more than 10,000 civilians and displaced over 3 million people. it began when the houthis and allied military units loyal to a former president seized yemen's capital, sanaa, in september 2014.the saudi-led coalition began its campaign in march 2015 in support of yemen's internationally recognized government.the war has ground into a stalemate. peace efforts by the united nations have faltered.






tech reacts to trump’s immigration ban


president donald trump signed an executive order on friday that temporarily halted the admission of refugees, indefinitely banned the admission of refugees from syria, and stopped citizens of several muslim-majority countries from entering the u.s. the american civil liberties union has already filed a legal challenge to the order.the order is so sweeping that it also includes any green card and visa holders from these countries. so if you were a citizen of these countries (iran, iraq, syria and sudan. libya, yemen and somalia) and had the bad luck of being outside of the u.s. at the time the order went into effect, you’re now barred from entering the country for at least the next 90 days. unsurprisingly, that’s already affecting the employees of many of the largest tech companies, which t