Candlelites

Everything from Everywhere

progressives look for more gains from illinois primary - Search

progressives look for more gains from illinois primary Searched between all the resources and sites across the web. To view the full text news click on the links searched. All links are displayed with the source site.



progressives look for more gains from illinois primary


chicago — progressives were facing their latest test tuesday in illinois, with a slew of candidates vying for a chance to help democrats try to gain control of the u.s. house this fall.enthusiasm already has been higher than usual among democrats in the left-leaning state. in several districts currently held by republican congressmen — areas where democrats have sometimes struggled to field even one candidate — roughly a half dozen democrats are seeking the party's nomination in tuesday's primary. many of them are motivated by president donald trump's election and his policies.tuesday's primary also will decide whether one of the most conservative democrats in congress keeps his seat, as well as the likely successor to longtime democratic u.s. rep. luis gutierrez, who's retiring. there als






in the primary, don't accidentally vote for the neo-nazi


arthur jones slithered out of his hole in the ground in lyons to run for the united states congress in a republican primary election, and nobody stepped up to challenge him.jones — a holocaust denier, anti-semite, neo-nazi and white supremacist — is running unopposed as a gop candidate in a west suburban-based u.s. house race. that means any primary voter in the 3rd congressional district who pulls a republican ballot for the illinois primary will see only jones’ name listed. he’ll win the primary by default. the man who once dressed as a nazi to march in skokie will win a republican primary.this is not a good look for the illinois republican party. it’s evidently too late for party officials to do anything except ask jones to drop out, which he’s unlikely to do. “there is no room for neo






billionaire businessman jb pritzker wins democratic primary for illinois governo


share storyby the associated pressthe associated presschicago (ap) — billionaire businessman jb pritzker wins democratic primary for illinois governor.the associated press






illinois primary puts focus on security of state voter rolls


springfield, ill. — with the illinois primary just days away, state election officials are beefing up cyber defenses and scanning for possible intrusions into voting systems and voter registration rolls.they have good reason to be on guard: two years ago, illinois was the lone state known to have its state election system breached in a hacking effort that ultimately targeted 21 states.federal intelligence agencies determined that the attempted hacking of state elections systems in 2016 primarily targeted voter registration systems, not actual voting machines or vote tallying.cybersecurity experts say it's crucial for states to shore up vulnerabilities in those systems now, with this year's midterm elections already underway.






fed-up illinois homeowners consider moving: 'it’s not just the property taxes on


ablin, who works in both florida and chicago, said he ultimately decided to make florida his primary residence. he rents an apartment in downtown chicago that he uses when in the city on [email protected] @gailmarksjarvistwitter @corilynsrelated storieswhy we stay: notable chicagoans talk about why they call city home »commentary: can millennials afford a future in illinois? »illinois loses more residents in 2016 than any other state »






a look at competitive us house races in the illinois primary


chicago (ap) — several u.s. house races are expected to be competitive in the illinois primary, including an open seat, a seat held by a seven-term democrat facing a challenge from his left and several republican seats that democrats hope to flip come november.here’s a look at five congressional races in the march 20 primary:3rd district: conservative democrat challengedseven-term democratic rep. daniel lipinksi faces the most serious primary challenge he’s seen in years. democrats have often claimed lipinski — among the most conservative house democrats — is the wrong fit for the district that covers a stretch of chicago and southwest suburbs, including working-class communities. more than one-third of residents in the solidly democratic district are hispanic. there have been primary atte






illinois primary puts focus on security of state voter rolls


springfield, ill. (ap) — with the illinois primary just days away, state election officials are beefing up cyber defenses and scanning for possible intrusions into voting systems and voter registration rolls.they have good reason to be on guard: two years ago, illinois was the lone state known to have its state election system breached in a hacking effort that ultimately targeted 21 states.federal intelligence agencies determined that the attempted hacking of state elections systems in 2016 primarily targeted voter registration systems, not actual voting machines or vote tallying.cybersecurity experts say it’s crucial for states to shore up vulnerabilities in those systems now, with this year’s midterm elections already underway.most read nation & world storiesunlimited digital access: $1






trump factor looms large in illinois governor primary campaigns


president donald trump isn’t on tuesday’s ballot, but as the final weekend of the illinois primary campaign arrives, his persona looms large.as university of illinois political scientist christopher mooney puts it: “there’s a trump aspect to everything in american politics at this moment.”for republicans, it’s a question of whether the enthusiasm that gave trump more than 2 million votes and victories in 91 of the state’s 102 counties in 2016 (despite an overall loss to hillary clinton here) will manifest itself in the primary for governor.for democrats, it’s a matter of ensuring the protest energy that followed trump’s election through such groups as indivisible and others have a demonstrable follow-through with people showing up at the polls.but the trump factor comes with contradictions






trump factor looms large in illinois governor primary campaigns


president donald trump isn’t on tuesday’s ballot, but as the final weekend of the illinois primary campaign arrives, his persona looms large.as university of illinois political scientist christopher mooney puts it: “there’s a trump aspect to everything in american politics at this moment.”for republicans, it’s a question of whether the enthusiasm that gave trump more than 2 million votes and victories in 91 of the state’s 102 counties in 2016 (despite an overall loss to hillary clinton here) will manifest itself in the primary for governor.for democrats, it’s a matter of ensuring the protest energy that followed trump’s election through such groups as indivisible and others have a demonstrable follow-through with people showing up at the polls.but the trump factor comes with contradictions






crowded republican field emerges in 9th congressional district primary involving


in what's shaping up to be a hotly contested race during the 2018 election, four republican candidates, including a pastor from arlington heights, are competing against each other for the chance to try and unseat incumbent u.s. rep. jan schakowsky, a democrat.the four republican candidates who have filed for the march 2018 primary in illinois' 9th congressional district include lt. col. sargis sangari, a retired u.s. army veteran from skokie; rev. john elleson, a pastor from arlington heights; glencoe resident maxwell rice; and evanston resident d. vincent thomas, jr., a u.s. coast guard veteran with a doctorate in public policy and administration.the winner who emerges from the crowded republican field in march will challenge schakowsky, a longtime democrat from evanston, during the gener






dem gov. debate: kennedy, biss bash madigan; pritzker won't say if it's time for


the democratic candidates for governor sought to sell themselves to primary voters at a tuesday night forum in aurora, but much of the focus was on a guy who wasn't on the stage: veteran illinois house speaker michael madigan, who also heads the illinois democratic party.state sen. daniel biss and businessman chris kennedy ripped madigan, saying he’s been in office too long and wields too much power. meanwhile, entrepreneur and philanthropist j.b. pritzker, who has received the backing of much of the democratic establishment, declined to say whether it’s time for madigan to go.“he’s been around an awful long time,” said pritzker, who suggested that putting in place term limits on legislative leaders is “an answer to that question.”pritzker said he and madigan agree on some issues, but disa






early voting in lake county sees boost in lead-up to tuesday's primary


thousands more lake county voters took advantage of early voting opportunities as this year's primary day approached, the lake county clerk said.tuesday's primary includes a lengthy roster of competitive races locally, from the governor to the lake county board, with congressional and statehouse races mixed in.the lake county board races include a two-way republican primary contest in district 3 for the seat vacated by tom weber of lake villa, who is running for the illinois house of representatives; a four-way democrat race for audrey nixon's former seat in district 14 in north chicago; and a three-way republican contest for now-state rep. nick sauer's former seat in district 17.beyond the county board, two democrats are vying for a chance to face lake county clerk carla wyckoff, the incu






ald. ameya pawar leaves race for illinois governor


when he became the first democratic governor candidate in january, north side ald. ameya pawar acknowledged he faced a big challenge in trying to corral progressive support to make up for his lack of significant money and name recognition.on thursday, pawar abruptly became the first major-tier contender to pull the plug on his candidacy, telling supporters he lacked the campaign cash needed to fully organize and compete across illinois compared to better-funded and wealthier rivals in the march 18 primary election.pawar’s decision to drop out speeds up the effort by the remaining candidates to try to tap support from the progressive wing of a democratic party split between backers of vermont sen. bernie sanders’ failed presidential bid and establishment supporters of defeated nominee hilla






millions of dollars' worth of tv ads later, illinois governor candidates now nee


like chicago’s downtown on st. patrick’s day weekend, a river of green has flowed through tv sets ahead of tuesday’s primary vote, as governor candidates have spent tens of millions of dollars on advertising during the long campaign.the frenzied final weekend of in-person campaigning supplements the nearly $65.7 million spent by governor candidates and interest groups on tv commercials so far. the contest could become the most expensive race to be illinois’ chief executive in state history.that tv spending total — in just the primary — is more than the record $65.3 million republican gov. bruce rauner spent on his entire 2014 campaign.democratic candidate j.b. pritzker, a billionaire heir to the hyatt hotel fortune who has put a record $69.5 million into his bid, has spent nearly $33.5 mil






downstate illinois vote could be primary election key for both parties


at a recent democratic governor candidate forum, j.b. pritzker dropped some local touchstones into his opening remarks.“i’ve been listening to people all across the state of illinois, especially those here in central illinois, and how neglected you all have been,” he told the audience at the university of illinois at springfield. “specifically, i’ve listened to the students and faculty here at uis, to parishioners at union baptist church, the farmers at the farm progress show in decatur and to early childhood educators in champaign.”the church has a predominantly african-american congregation, dating back to 1871. the farm show is the lollapalooza of the agriculture business. and pritzker mentioning them was a way to demonstrate his downstate bona fides.for rival daniel biss, earning credi






the capital gains tax rate is a moral outrage


photo: flickrnobody ever clicks on blog posts about tax policy, because it’s not “sexy” enough. fuck you! how else are we supposed to win the class war? advertisementlook at this dissent story by julia ott. it’s good. it delves into (surprisingly racist!) history to explain why capital gains—money that people earn from investments—is taxed at a significantly lower rate than regular income that people earn from their labor. it is staggering and disgusting that america, with all of our “hard work” rhetoric, has for decades zealously protected a system that taxes money people earned from sitting on their ass doing nothing less than money people earned from working. the capital gains tax rate is an outrage on its face and exposes much of what conservatives say as a farce and i can only assume






the capital gains tax rate is a moral outrage


photo: flickrnobody ever clicks on blog posts about tax policy, because it’s not “sexy” enough. fuck you! how else are we supposed to win the class war? advertisementlook at this dissent story by julia ott. it’s good. it delves into (surprisingly racist!) history to explain why capital gains—money that people earn from investments—is taxed at a significantly lower rate than regular income that people earn from their labor. it is staggering and disgusting that america, with all of our “hard work” rhetoric, has for decades zealously protected a system that taxes money people earned from sitting on their ass doing nothing less than money people earned from working. the capital gains tax rate is an outrage on its face and exposes much of what conservatives say as a farce and i can only assume






holocaust denier likely to appear on ballot for gop for chicago-area congression


a west suburban man known as a holocaust denier and for his ties to neo-nazism is expected to advance to november’s general election for illinois’ 3rd congressional district seat.arthur j. jones, 70, of lyons, is the lone candidate on the march 15 republican primary ticket for the seat that includes western springs, la grange and parts of southwestern chicago. jones, a former member of the american national socialist workers party, has run for political office several times in the past but has never made it past the primary stage in the 3rd district.most recently, in 2016, jones ran unopposed on the republican ballot but was removed for flagrant disregard of the election code. jones said his candidacy was challenged by members of the illinois republican party, who questioned the legitimacy






2 illinois governor candidates spend $26m in last 3 months


springfield, ill. (ap) — the november election race for illinois governor cost $28 million just for the last three months of 2017.campaign finance disclosure reports filed this week show that $9 of every $10 was spent by two candidates — republican gov. bruce rauner and democratic challenger j.b. pritzker.rauner faces a march 20 primary challenge from wheaton rep. jeanne ives. rauner raised $3 million in the last quarter, spent $13 million and has $56 million in the bank.billionaire pritzker raised $21 million, spent $13 million and has $8 million on hand.most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 for 4 weeks.pritzker primary challengers include sen. daniel biss of evanston and chicago businessman chris kennedy. they raised a little over $1 million apiece but biss has $3 million left to






is your 50-50 relationship ruining your marriage?


attitudes may have changed since the days husbands brought home the bacon and wives stayed home with the kids. but according to new research, deviating from conventional gender roles makes both men and women miserable. despite the gains women have made economically, most don’t want to be providers and protectors. and men don’t want to be dependent on their wives.researchers karen kramer and sunjin pak at the university of illinois examined data on nearly 1,500 men and 1,800 women between the ages of 52 and 60 and found that the more women’s paychecks increased, the more women reported symptoms of depression. but the opposite effect was found in men: their psychological well-being was highest when they were the primary wage-earners.“the results supported the overarching hypothesis: well-bei






pritzker, kennedy, biss try for top spot on democratic governor primary ballot


three candidates running in the illinois democratic governor primary filed their election paperwork monday, vying for the first spot on the march ballot.billionaire hotel heir and investor j.b. pritzker, businessman chris kennedy and state sen. daniel biss each submitted petitions at 8 a.m., which means there’ll be a lottery to determine who appears first on the march 20 primary ballot.on the republican side, gov. bruce rauner won’t have to worry about his ballot position. he was the lone republican to file for governor on monday when the state board of elections opened for business. state rep. jeanne ives of wheaton, a three-term lawmaker, said she will submit her petitions to challenge rauner in the gop primary later. the deadline is dec. 4.it’s considered a slight advantage to appear fi






before his bid to become california governor, john cox took on some guy named ob


the candidate was opposed to entrenched lawmakers doing favors for friends and sold himself as an anti-corruption reformer in favor of limited government. was it the 2004 illinois senate race or the 2018 california governor’s race? for john cox, it was both.in the heat of the 2003 illinois u.s. senate primary, millionaire republican businessman cox stood on a debate stage in chicago, butting heads with a little-known democratic state senator named barack obama.neither candidate was considered their party’s favorite. but things began looking up for obama, of course, who won the senate race and then the presidency. cox dropped out before the gop primary election. it was his third try for elected office in illinois and his third defeat.now he’s back, this time in his new home of california, r






refusing to believe early progressives loved eugenics will not erase the horribl


most people close their eyes to unpleasantness in their past. political movements do the same thing on a grander scale. nowhere is this truer than in the willful blindness of twenty-first-century progressives to their early twentieth-century counterparts’ embrace of eugenics.if you have spent any time in the conservative or pro-life movements, it is not news to you that the leading lights of progressive opinion a century ago openly embraced eugenics. eugenics, the theory that social policies must be enacted to cull the “bad genes” from society, was popular among progressives across the developed world, including the united states. what constituted “bad genes” was, according to its proponents, a matter of scientific consensus. today we would call it racism and classism.after seeing the end






lawmakers approve plan to protect monarch butterfly habitats


springfield, ill. (ap) — illinois lawmakers have approved a plan proponents say will help protect the habitat of monarch butterflies.the proposal would prohibit counties and towns from classifying milkweed as noxious or exotic weed. milkweed is a primary food source for monarch larvae.backers say it’s vital to plant more milkweed, not ban it.environmental experts say over a dozen illinois cities classify milkweed as noxious.most read storiessale! save over 90% on digital access.however, some opponents say local communities should be able to decide whether to ban it.the senate approved the plan 41-6 tuesday. it’s headed to gov. bruce rauner’s desk.sen. melinda bush, a grayslake democrat, was a sponsor. she says illinois has a unique relationship to the insect and they should be protected.mo






ives' anti-rauner ad ripped as 'racist, sexist, homophobic'


update: on saturday, illinois republican party chairman tim schneider released a statement calling on state rep. jeanne ives to take down the ad."there is no place in the illinois republican party for rhetoric that attacks our fellow illinoisans based on their race, gender or humanity. rep. ives' campaign ad does not reflect who we are as the party of lincoln and as proud residents of our great and diverse state," said schneider, an ally of republican gov. bruce rauner, who ives is challenging in the march 20 primary."she should pull down the ad and immediately apologize to the illinoisans who were negatively portrayed in a cowardly attempt to stoke political division," added schneider, a cook county commissioner.-republican primary challenger jeanne ives is mounting a full-bore attack on






what does illinois do with the taxes it collects?


most illinois legislators, and even gov. bruce rauner, want to raise taxes in order to close the estimated $5.4 billion illinois budget deficit.illinois already collects some of the highest taxes per capita of any state in the union. seven u.s. states have no income tax — and tennessee will soon become the eighth. only one of these seven states, washington, has a combined state and local sales tax higher than illinois’. so there are six states with no income tax, sales taxes lower than illinois’, and property taxes lower than illinois’.that makes me wonder: what does illinois do with all this tax money?do any other states have a bond rating near junk? do any other states have unfunded pension liabilities has high as illinois’? do any other states have a net of more than 10,000 people a yea






morning spin: gop legislator making primary challenge against gov. rauner


welcome to clout street: morning spin, our weekday feature to catch you up with what's going on in government and politics from chicago to springfield. subscribe here.topspina republican state legislator is making a primary challenge against illinois gov. bruce rauner.rep. jeanne ives of wheaton says in remarks released early monday by her campaign that she'll side with "taxpaying illinois families" instead of the "political ruling class." she notes that she supported rauner's campaign in 2014, but says illinois needs a new path.ives earlier said she'd selected former state rep. rich morthland as a lieutenant governor running mate.ives took office in 2013 and was formerly a member of the wheaton city council. she's a west point graduate and former army officer.ives made no secret of her di






holocaust denier likely to appear on ballot for gop for chicago-area congression


a west suburban man known as a holocaust denier and for his ties to neo-nazism is expected to advance to november’s general election for illinois’ 3rd congressional district seat.arthur j. jones, 70, of lyons, is the lone candidate on the march 20 republican primary ticket for the seat that includes western springs, la grange and parts of southwestern chicago. jones, a former member of the american national socialist workers party, has run for political office several times in the past but has never made it past the primary stage in the 3rd district.most recently, in 2016, jones ran unopposed on the republican ballot but was removed for flagrant disregard of the election code. jones said his candidacy was challenged by members of the illinois republican party, who questioned the legitimacy






progressives are not pleased with how democrats caved on shutdown


language warning.after slowing the federal government down for three days, democrats lost the standoff without making gains. senate minority leader chuck schumer is already taking the blame from both sides, but especially fellow democrats, who are saying he caved for practically nothing in return.sen. kamala harris was one of the 16 democrats who voted against reopening the government, saying that voting for a bill to codify president obama’s illegal waiver of immigration law or funding the government was a false choice.republican lawmakers and commentators from the right joined in on mocking schumer.and know you haven’t fooled anyone when rosie o’donnell is upset.






comey's sacking will not be the end of president trump | usa


too many so-called "progressives" still don't get it.there they were on twitter and in instant coffee-quick columns - joined by their titular intellectual leader, david frum (yes, him) - mimicking dylan thomas' verses to rage against the dying of the light while donald "nero" trump plays the proverbial fiddle as the constitution and the lingering shreds of the rule of law turn to ashes.this latest spasm of cable-tv-stoked hysteria was triggered by trump's jarring decision late tuesday afternoon to sack the ripe-for-the-sacking fbi director, james comey.  donald trump's loyal minions insisted that comey had to go because the cocky g-man had suddenly and conveniently earned an f over his handling of hillary clinton's curious handling of her emails. on cue and in unison, "progressives" shoute






ives vs. rauner: it's on.


republican gov. bruce rauner would love to spend these gray winter days focused on his november re-election bid against a democrat opponent, but he can’t. first, he’s got to win the republican primary on march 20, in which he will face off against former ally state rep. jeanne ives of wheaton.on monday, rauner and ives made a joint appearance before the tribune editorial board at which they sparred over who has the better strategy for addressing illinois’ political dysfunction and creating jobs. this is their only scheduled debate; you can view it at chicagotribune.com/gopgov.whenever an incumbent gets a serious primary challenge, that says something — that there’s uncertainty among party faithful, or dissatisfaction. such is the case for rauner, the former private equity executive who def






colorado's medicaid program is already thrifty


re: “medicaid is too expensive not to cut and too critical to decimate,” may 29 editorial. the careful use of money and resources so as to not be wasteful has been a guiding principle for colorado’s medicaid program, and the denver post editorial board’s suggestion that it needs to be “more thrifty” ignores the experience of medicaid expansion in colorado.colorado’s accountable care collaborative (acc) has been cited in multiple studies as an early indicator of what is possible in bending the cost curve. savings created by the program started in the first year and have increased over time. the acc has demonstrated what we, the primary care providers for more than one in eight coloradans, have been saying — investing in primary care increases access to preventive care and early intervention






indiana’s us senate race gains 3rd high-profile republican


indianapolis (ap) — the field has possibly been set now for this spring’s republican indiana primary deciding the challenger to democratic u.s. sen. joe donnelly.u.s. rep. todd rokita on thursday filed the petition signatures needed to qualify for the may primary ballot with the indiana secretary of state’s office. u.s. rep. luke messer and former state rep. mike braun submitted their petitions wednesday.state law requires senate candidates to submit signatures of at least 500 registered voters from each of indiana’s nine congressional districts.figures from the secretary of state’s office show three lesser-known republican candidates are well short of the needed signatures ahead of the feb. 9 filing deadline.most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 for 4 weeks.donnelly also filed his






cook county voters to be asked next year about legalizing marijuana


cook county voters will get their say on whether recreational marijuana use should be made legal for adults in illinois, after commissioners on wednesday voted to put that question on the march primary ballot.commissioners voted unanimously to approve the advisory referendum, which also has the support of board president toni preckwinkle, a longtime critic of the war on drugs. she maintains that current drug laws have a disparate impact on minorities — causing them to languish in jail on minor charges for lack of bail money and giving them a record that makes it hard to land a job.the referendum is advisory only, so weed would not become legal if the question is approved in the march 20 primary. but a strong showing could help state lawmakers make their case for marijuana legalization in s






cook county voters to be asked next year about legalizing marijuana


cook county voters will get their say on whether recreational marijuana use should be made legal for adults in illinois, after commissioners on wednesday voted to put that question on the march primary ballot.commissioners voted unanimously to approve the advisory referendum. board president toni preckwinkle also supports it, and the longtime critic of the war on drugs on wednesday reiterated her support for marijuana legalization. she has said that current drug laws have a disparate impact on minorities — causing them to languish in jail on minor charges for lack of bail money and giving them a record that makes it hard to land a job.the referendum is advisory only, so weed would not become legal if the question is approved in the march 20 primary. but a strong showing could help state la






illinois primary could set up most expensive governor’s race


chicago (ap) — two inordinately wealthy front-runners who have largely bankrolled their campaigns for illinois governor faced nomination challenges tuesday in a primary that also features a self-described “middle-class candidate,” a member of a famous political family and an insurgent state legislator.with republican gov. bruce rauner and democratic businessman j.b. pritzker combining to spend more than $120 million out of their own pockets so far on the contest, the battle for illinois’ top job is on pace to top california in 2010 as the most expensive governor’s race in u.s. history.the 61-year-old governor, a former venture capitalist serving in his first public office, took advantage of a national gop wave four years ago to pull off a surprising victory in a state otherwise dominated b






how games help learning / boing boing


by douglas thomas and john seely brownlisten to anyone talk about schools today: cl ical education just can't keep up. in the digital generation's world of constant change, most schooling is profoundly boring. but what else is possible? douglas thomas and john seely brown on games and education. listen to anyone talk about schools today: cl ical education just can't keep up. in the digital generation's world of constant change, most schooling is profoundly boring. but what else is possible?imagine an environment where the participants are building a m ive network databases, wikis and websites, and thousands of message forums, creating a large-scale knowledge economy. imagine an environment where participants constantly measure and evaluate their own performance, even if that requires them