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the sun might be an 'ordinary' star after all


is our sun fundamentally different from other "sun-like" stars? this question highlights an ongoing controversy about whether our nearest star is unique or, in fact, an "ordinary star."






deciphering 'q-speak': a guide to the language of blackhawks coach joel quennevi


blackhawks coach joel quenneville has his own brand of coachspeak, or “q-speak.” he likes to use certain words or phrases, which can sometimes be a challenge to interpret.“ordinary.”you do not want quenneville to call you ordinary. when asked to describe a player, he won’t come out and say that player is bad. but if you hear him refer to someone as ordinary, that’s not good. quenneville will also refer to the team’s play as ordinary, as in, “i thought we were ordinary in the first period.” even though it doesn’t sound bad, it is.“ok.”context and tone of voice mean everything when quenneville describes someone or something as “ok.” there are degrees. you have to read it. if he elaborates on a player after saying he was ok and has a bright tone of voice, that’s typically an average evaluatio






ap fact check: medicaid a target for cuts despite assurance


washington — medicaid is clearly in line for cuts under president donald trump's budget despite assurances to the contrary from his budget chief.mick mulvaney, director of the office of management and budget, while introducing the budget tuesday: "there are no medicaid cuts in the terms of what ordinary human beings would refer to as a cut. we are not spending less money one year than we spent before."the facts: mulvaney is being artfully evasive about the health care program for families and the poor. by any conventional measure of federal financing, the program is on the chopping block.his argument is that medicaid funding will still increase in dollar terms each year during the 10-year budget window. what president donald trump wants to do is merely slow the growth of medicaid spending,






grammar schools must serve 'ordinary families'


image copyrightpaimage caption justine greening has launched a consultation on supporting "ordinary working families" education secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".but a new analysis from the government shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.helping struggling, working families, missed by other poverty measures, has become the focus of ms greening's education reforms.recent figures showed that most child poverty is now in working families.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.'privileged few'ms greening is to give a speech at st mar






the power of ordinary people facing totalitarianism


the power of ordinary people facing totalitarianism by kathleen b. jones, professor emerita of women’s studies, emphasis on politics, san diego state university. a 1969 photo of political theorist and scholar hannah arendt. ap photo in the weeks since the election of president donald j. trump,...






grammar schools must serve 'ordinary families'


image copyrightpaimage caption justine greening has launched a consultation on supporting "ordinary working families" education secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".but a new analysis from the government shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.helping struggling, working families, missed by other poverty measures, has become the focus of ms greening's education reforms.recent figures showed that most child poverty is now in working families.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.ms greening is to give a speech at st mary's university o






grammar schools must serve 'ordinary families'


image copyrightpaimage caption justine greening has launched a consultation on supporting "ordinary working families" education secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".the school system needs to find ways to support those who are struggling - and not "the privileged few", she will say in a speech later.new government analysis shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.recent figures showed that most child poverty is now in working families.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.helping these struggling, working families, missed by other pove






grammar schools must serve 'ordinary families'


image copyrightpaimage caption justine greening has launched a consultation on supporting "ordinary working families" education secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".the school system needs to support those who are struggling and not "the privileged few", she will say later.but new government analysis shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.labour says this adds to the evidence that grammar schools do not support social mobility.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.recent official figures showed that most child poverty is now in worki






can trump take health care hostage?


the president is trying to bully democrats by threatening to hurt millions of innocent bystanders — ordinary american families who have gained coverage thanks to health reform. true, democrats care about these families — but republicans at least pretend to care about them, too.three weeks have passed since the trumpcare debacle. after eight years spent denouncing the affordable care act, the gop finally found itself in a position to do what it had promised, and deliver something better. but it couldn’t.and republicans — president donald trump very much included — had nobody but themselves to blame. basically, the party has been lying all this time, and the lies finally caught up with the liars. trump promised health care that would be “far less expensive and far better”; in the end, all he






reactions to senate health care bill being crafted in secret (2 letters)


chip somodevilla, getty imagesu.s. senate majority leader mitch mcconnell, along with several republican senators, speaks to reporters tuesday after the weekly gop policy luncheon at the u.s. capitol.re: “colorado gov. hickenlooper joins kasich and others in bipartisan letter opposing gop health care bill,” june 16 news story. hats off to gov. john hickenlooper and six other governors who asked senate leaders to take a sensible approach toward the reform of affordable care act.u.s. health care costs have soared to $3.2 trillion a year (or nearly 20 percent of gdp) and consume an ever larger share of family budgets. the governors’ letter, signed by members of both parties, called for a bipartisan effort to achieve the obvious goals for health care legislation, namely to control health care






manjaro linux 17.0.2 is released, and it's time to update your passwords


a new release of manjaro linux (17.0.2) has been announced. of course, because manjaro is a "rolling release" distribution model, this is actually just a roll-up of the updates since the last manjaro release. so if you are already running manjaro you don't need to reinstall, you just have to make sure that you have all the latest updates installed.there is an important difference this time, though. a weakness has been discovered in the way passwords were set during the installation of manjaro linux, for all releases prior to this one. the details are explained in this manjaro forum post, but in a nutshell what happened was that passwords set during system installation, both for the user account and for root, were done in a way that could make them easier for an attacker to break. the solut






grammar schools must be open to 'ordinary families'


media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionjustine greening plans to lift the ban on new grammar schoolseducation secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".the school system needs to support those who are struggling and not "the privileged few", she will say later.but new government analysis shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.labour says this adds to the evidence that grammar schools do not support social mobility.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.'ordinary' family incomems greening said they could be a family with a






grammar school places must open to 'ordinary families'


media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionjustine greening plans to lift the ban on new grammar schoolseducation secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".the school system needs to support those who are struggling and not "the privileged few", she will say later.but new government analysis shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.labour says this adds to the evidence that grammar schools do not support social mobility.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.'ordinary' family incomems greening said they could be a family with a






grammar school places must open to 'ordinary families'


media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionjustine greening plans to lift the ban on new grammar schoolseducation secretary justine greening wants england's schools, including a new generation of grammars, to do more to help "ordinary working families".the school system needs to support those who are struggling and not "the privileged few", she will say later.but new government analysis shows a majority of selective school places go to more affluent families.labour says this adds to the evidence that grammar schools do not support social mobility.these "ordinary working families" are defined as not the poorest, but living on "modest incomes", and likely to live in suburbs and coastal towns away from london.'ordinary' family incomems greening said they could be a family with a






health care 'access' is not the same as 'coverage'


watching top republicans explain their proposed affordable care act replacement can make you wonder who hijacked the english language.for example, if you're like me, you might have been shocked by the news that 24 million fewer americans will have health insurance by 2026 if the republican-proposed alternative passes, according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office — including 14 million fewer people in the next year alone.but that's ok, say republican congressional leaders. house speaker paul ryan, a wisconsin republican, already had declared such gloomy outlooks to be a "bogus" metric. it's not "coverage" that counts, he said; it's "access.""what matters is that we're lowering costs of health care and giving people access to affordable health care plans," ryan said in a news con






elections: theresa may says there are no 'no-go areas' for tories


theresa may has launched the conservatives' local election campaign, saying there are no "no-go areas" for the party."don't let anyone tell you that conservatives don't care about working people," she told party activists in nottinghamshire.conservatives "must and will ensure that hard work is decently rewarded", she added.the pm also accused rival parties of being in "chaos and disarray".mrs may launched her party's campaign in the same county chosen by jeremy corbyn on wednesday to launch labour's campaign, as the tories target labour council seats.she said the conservatives were now the one party in the uk which had put itself "unashamedly at the service of ordinary, working people".she added: "as we leave the eu, our conservative government will act to protect and indeed to enhance wor






vetrax download


download download the vetrax app requires a vetrax sensor that is only available through participating veterinarians as well as an existing vet-client relationship with a participating veterinarian. vetrax, the veterinary medical analytics solution for dogs allows you and your veterinarian to track the effectiveness of your dog's health care program - even when your dog is home alone. the behavior monitoring system uses a lightweight sensor on your dog's collar to capture detailed data around the clock and transmit it to your veterinarian. the vetrax app allows you to view behavior data and information related to your dog's health care program. you can favorite behavior charts from the chart library and add them to your pet's home screen to keep a close eye on specific behaviors. if you ob






"health care" bills mask the costs of health care, because they're about insuran


thinkstock by getty imagesdespite their names, the affordable care act, the american health care act, and now the better care reconciliation act are really not about health care. they are all about insurance, which masks the charged costs of medical care. to solve the health care cost crisis, we need to understand the charges that medical providers submit. that’s usually shown on an insurer’s explanation of benefits, but they can be ignored by the insurance policy holder who doesn’t have to pay them. when one is admitted to a hospital emergency room or doctor’s office, the question is never “what will this cost?” but rather “what is the insurance company?”richard fritz,longmontsubmit a letter to the editor via this form or check out our guidelines for how to submit by e-mail or mail.






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






newspaper headlines: workers' rights plan and cyber-attack fears


image caption the i leads with a pledge from theresa may to guarantee eu labour laws for the uk, in what the party is calling the "biggest extension of employee rights by any conservative government". the party will make a commitment to increase the living wage and introduce statutory rights for family care and training. the newspaper says mrs may is seeking to win over labour voters with a promise to help "ordinary working families". image caption the daily express also leads with the workers' rights plan from the tories, calling it a "family friendly policies pledge". the newspaper says it is a vote-winning package, which will also include rights to extended leave to care for sick relatives. image caption the daily telegraph also focuses on the leave to care for the elderly as promised b






how did we get here? four essential reads on the status of health care in americ


by the conversation. house speaker paul ryan at a march 7, 2017 unveiling of the new health care bill called the american health care plan. susan walsh/ap editor’s note: the following is a roundup of archival stories related to the proposed american health care act and the affordable care act, commonly called obamacare. turmoil around health…






the financial reality of leaving care


eleven councils in england are now offering council tax relief to adults under the age of 25 if they lived in care as children.the bbc's ashley john-baptiste lived in care from two until he was 18.he asked care leavers about their finances and whether the move would make a difference to them.watch the victoria derbyshire programme on weekdays between 09:00 and 11:00 on bbc two and the bbc news channel.






prince harry: no one in royal family wants to be king


britain's prince harry has suggested that no one in the royal family really wishes to rise to the throne — and that it is duty, rather than desire, that prompts them to continue serving the british people. in an interview with newsweek magazine, harry said the house of windsor is "not doing this for ourselves but for the greater good of the people." he also spoke openly about his distress at having to walk behind his mother's coffin as a 12-year-old boy in full public view, saying: "i don't think any child should be asked to do that, under any circumstances." the 32-year-old royal was recalling the day in 1997 when he joined his brother prince william, then 15, and other members of the royal family in a funeral procession through london's streets for princess diana, who died in a car accid






dementia: why son fears for mum's future care


in 2014, andriani was suffering from dementia, and sold her small house in london to pay for residential care. the 64-year-old's condition has deteriorated rapidly since then, while the costs to care for her have risen from £60,000 to £100,000 a year.her son, alex, tells the bbc her story, and why he wants to see "a radical overhaul" of the way social care in england is funded.






how your finances affect your care options | the global dispatch


share thistagscost controlenglandfinancefinancial assistancefinancial crisisfinancial planninggreat britainhidden moneylondonmoney hiddenunited kingdomyour finances have a big effect on your care options, and it is important to understand exactly how they affect your care options so you’re prepared for all eventualities. photo/steve buissinne via pixabayyour finances heavily affect your care options, which makes sense because care needs to be paid for, there is no such thing as free care. even if you’re eligible for your care to be paid for, an organisation, or the state is still paying for it so it is never really free. getting financial help with the cost of caregetting financial help towards the cost of care is something everyone should look into before choosing their care options. your






hair care tips download


download download these homemade hair treatments will help you to create your own natural and organic hair care, beauty products and remedies. hair is mark of good confidence in human grooming. maintaining your hair is relatively easy with the right kind of steps. maintaining your hair is relatively easy with the right kind of steps. hair care app gives u tips about hair care, and what you can do at home to get unbelievably beautiful hair. hair carehair care tipsbeauty tipsskin carescalp carehead skin carebeautiful hairs tipshair careif you are losing hair, you can install hair care tips in hindi app to understand what all tricks can be followed to avoid hair loss. we recommend hair care tips with natural ingredients which can be tried at home. these such queries as well other is perfectly






the haunting face of a man who lived 700 years ago


behold “context 958"—an ordinary man who lived in 13th century england. (credit: dr. chris rynn, university of dundee)this may look like a photograph, but the highly realistic face staring back at you belongs to a man who died over 700 years ago. the researchers who performed this unbelievable facial reconstruction say their work is providing new details about the way ordinary people lived in medieval england. advertisementthis 13th-century man—dubbed “context 958"—is one of approximately 400 complete burials found and excavated beneath the old divinity school of st. john’s college in cambridge, england, between 2010 and 2012. back during the medieval era, this spot was home to the hospital of st. john, a charitable institution set up to care for the poor and sick in the community. for cen






the haunting face of a man who lived 700 years ago


behold “context 958"—an ordinary man who lived in 13th century england. (credit: dr. chris rynn, university of dundee)this may look like a photograph, but the highly realistic face staring back at you belongs to a man who died over 700 years ago. the researchers who performed this unbelievable facial reconstruction say their work is providing new details about the way ordinary people lived in medieval england. advertisementthis 13th-century man—dubbed “context 958"—is one of approximately 400 complete burials found and excavated beneath the old divinity school of st. john’s college in cambridge, england, between 2010 and 2012. back during the medieval era, this spot was home to the hospital of st. john, a charitable institution set up to care for the poor and sick in the community. for cen






the financial reality of leaving care


eleven councils in england are now offering council tax relief to adults under the age of 25 if they lived in care as children.the bbc's ashley john-baptiste lived in care from two until he was 18.he asked care leavers about their finances and whether the move would make a difference to them.read more on this story here. watch the victoria derbyshire programme on weekdays between 09:00 and 11:00 on bbc two and the bbc news channel.






15 questions to ask when buying a used car


upgrading to a newer vehicle can be very exciting. you probably know a few things about cars, but not knowing the best questions to ask can make the experience intimidating.below are several questions to help you get started and overcome challenges along the way. if you show confidence, stick to your budget, and ask your own questions along the way, you will end up with a used car you will love.what is your budget?one of the first questions to ask when buying a used car is about money. what is your budget for this vehicle? there are several recommendations about how much you should spend on a vehicle. various sources suggest only paying cash or making a large down payment to keep your monthly payments low.how much is my current vehicle worth?if your trade-in vehicle still has a lot of valu