homelessness



these solar farms have a secret hiding under them: mushrooms

these solar farms have a secret hiding under them: mushroomssmall farmers in japan hope the tactic will help stabilize their incomes by letting them sell both energy and produce. we simply created the suitable environment for them by making use of vacant space under the solar panels.” [p o: sustainergy] by adele peterssmall farms in japan are struggling to survive. rural populations are shrinking, and the average farmer is 67 years old. but two new farms will test a different business model to try to reinvigorate the sector: solar panels with mushrooms growing underneath them.the farms, at two locations in northeastern japan, will produce a combined 4,000 kilowatts of solar power that will be sold to a local utility, while the mushroom farms will yield an annual 40 tons of cloud-ear mushrooms, a crop that is typically imported from china.“we designed the project of combination with solar farms at large scale so that farmers could obtain additional stable income.” [p o: sustainergy]“the environment needs to be dark and humid for mushrooms to spawn,” says minami kikuchi, who leads the “solar sharing” project that combines agriculture and solar power at sustainergy, a renewable energy startup. “we simply created the suitable environment for them by making use of vacant space under the solar panels.” the company is working with hitachi capital, a leasing specialist that will provide the panels, and daiwa house industry, which will construct and maintain them.“there is no doubt that japanese agriculture is facing a serious crisis–the average age of japanese farmers has been rising, and abandoned farmland has been expanding, mainly due to severe economic position of farmers,” kikuchi writes fast company in an email. “to make improvements in this situ ... ادامه ...

these solar farms have a secret hiding under them: mushrooms

these solar farms have a secret hiding under them: mushroomssmall farmers in japan hope the tactic will help stabilize their incomes by letting them sell both energy and produce. we simply created the suitable environment for them by making use of vacant space under the solar panels.” [p o: sustainergy] by adele peterssmall farms in japan are struggling to survive. rural populations are shrinking, and the average farmer is 67 years old. but two new farms will test a different business model to try to reinvigorate the sector: solar panels with mushrooms growing underneath them.the farms, at two locations in northeastern japan, will produce a combined 4,000 kilow3tts of solar power that will be sold to a local utility, while the mushroom farms will yield an annual 40 tons of cloud-ear mushrooms, a crop that is typically imported from china.“we designed the project of combination with solar farms at large scale so that farmers could obtain additional stable income.” [p o: sustainergy]“the environment needs to be dark and humid for mushrooms to spawn,” says minami kikuchi, who leads the “solar sharing” project that combines agriculture and solar power at sustainergy, a renewable energy startup. “we simply created the suitable environment for them by making use of vacant space under the solar panels.” the company is working with hitachi capital, a leasing specialist that will provide the panels, and daiwa house industry, which will construct and maintain them.“there is no doubt that japanese agriculture is facing a serious crisis–the average age of japanese farmers has been rising, and abandoned farmland has been expanding, mainly due to severe economic position of farmers,” kikuchi writes fast company in an email. “to make improvements in this situ ... ادامه ...