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governor took 15 minutes to announce missile alert was false


honolulu — the hawaii national guard's top commander said friday he told gov. david ige that a missile alert was a false alarm two minutes after it went out statewide. but the governor didn't tell the public until 15 minutes later.maj. gen. arthur "joe" logan told state lawmakers at a hearing that he called the governor at 8:09 a.m. saturday after speaking to a supervisor at the hawaii emergency management agency, whose employee accidentally sent the alert.ige spokeswoman cindy mcmillan said the governor had to track her down to prepare a message for the public. she said the governor's communications team handles his social media.ige's office relayed an emergency management agency tweet about the false alarm at 8:24 a.m. six minutes later, a notice went up on his facebook page.rep. kaniela






hawaii missile alert: false alarm sparks panic in us state


image copyrighttwitterimage caption the message hawaiians saw on their phones an incoming missile alert plunged residents of hawaii into panic on saturday morning before it was declared a false alarm.mobile phone users received a message saying: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."state governor david ige apologised and said it was caused by an employee pressing the wrong button. the us government announced there would be a full investigation. an alert system is in place because of the potential proximity of hawaii to north korean missiles.in december, the state tested its nuclear warning siren for the first time since the end of the cold war.media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionone man told us broadcaster cbs that h






hawaii missile alert: false alarm sparks panic in us state


image copyrighttwitterimage caption the message hawaiians saw on their phones an incoming missile alert plunged residents of hawaii into panic on saturday morning before it was declared a false alarm.mobile phone users received a message saying: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."state governor david ige apologised and said it was caused by an employee pressing the wrong button. the us government announced there would be a full investigation. an alert system is in place because of the potential proximity of hawaii to north korean missiles.in december, the state tested its nuclear warning siren for the first time since the end of the cold war.media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionone man told us broadcaster cbs that h






the latest: hawaii governor says mistake can't happen again


honolulu — the latest on a missile threat mistakenly sent by hawaii officials (all times local):9:45 a.m.hawaii gov. david ige (ig'-eh) says he's meeting with officials this morning to find out what happened after an alert was mistakenly sent to residents saying a ballistic missile was inbound for hawaii.the missile threat was a false alarm.ige says he's meeting with the state defense and emergency management officials to not only find out how this could occur, but to make sure it doesn't happen again.ige says, "the public must have confidence in our emergency alert system."__9:15 a.m.hawaii sen. brian schatz says a false alarm about a missile threat was based on "human error" and was "totally inexcusable."schatz went on his twitter account after emergency management officials confirmed th






hawaii missile false alarm triggers shock, blame and apologies


media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionpeople were warned to take shelterresidents and visitors in hawaii have been recalling the shock of a false missile alarm, with many saying they thought they were going to die.the alert of an incoming ballistic missile was sent wrongly on saturday morning by an emergency system worker.victims of the ordeal spoke of hysteria and panicked evacuations.the false alarm sparked recriminations, with state officials apologising and president donald trump's response called into question.why was the alert sent?it was a mistake by an employee at hawaii's emergency management agency (ema) who "pushed the wrong button" during procedures that occur during the handover of a shift.mobile phone users received the message at 08:07 (18:07 gmt): "ballis






the latest: trump promises involvement after hawaii alert


honolulu — the latest on a missile threat mistakenly sent by hawaii officials (all times local):3:30 p.m.president donald trump says the federal government will "get involved" with hawaii following the false alarm about an incoming missile strike on the island state.trump says what happened saturday "was a state thing." he did not describe the level of federal involvement he envisions, but the federal communications commission has opened an investigation.hawaii residents received cellphone alerts saturday warning of an incoming ballistic missile strike. state officials later said someone doing a routine test during a shift change at the emergency management agency mistakenly hit the live alert button.hawaii's governor has apologized.speaking of hawaii officials, trump said "i love that the






hawaii told to fix its alert system after false missile alarm


media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionpeople were warned to take shelterthe us state of hawaii has been told it did not have "reasonable" safeguards in place to prevent the false missile alert that caused panic on saturday.ajit pai, chairman of america's media regulator, the federal communications commission (fcc), said the error was "absolutely unacceptable".the 38-minute delay in issuing the correction made it worse, he added.he called for officials at all levels throughout the us to work together to rectify any vulnerabilities.residents and visitors to hawaii were shocked to receive the false alert of an incoming ballistic missile, sent to their mobile phones early on saturday morning.apologising afterwards, hawaii's governor david ige said a member of staff had press






first hawaii, now japan sends a false alarm about incoming north korean missile


japanese public broadcaster nhk mistakenly sent an alert tuesday warning that north korea had fired a missile, just days after a similar mistake caused panic in hawaii.unlike in the hawaii case, however, this error took only five minutes to correct."nhk news alert. north korea appears to have launched a missile," nhk said in a notification sent through its app to mobile phone users at 6:55 p.m. tokyo time. "the government j-alert urges people to take shelter inside buildings or underground."japan has an advanced warning system, known as j-alerts, that has traditionally been used for earthquakes but has, over the past year, increasingly been used to warn about north korean missile activity.north korea fired two missiles over the japanese island of hokkaido last year, triggering the expansio






'we made a mistake': hawaii officials apologize after false emergency missile al


a false emergency message warning hawaii residents of an incoming ballistic missile sent people scrambling in panic saturday. the alert, which was sent to cellphones and appeared on television, asked people to "seek immediate shelter" and added, “this is not a drill.” reaction quickly spread across... (jessica perez)






japan public tv sends mistaken north korean missile alert


tokyo — japan's public broadcaster mistakenly sent an alert warning citizens of a north korean missile launch and urging them to seek immediate shelter, then retracted it minutes later, days after a similar error in hawaii.nhk television issued the message tuesday on its internet and mobile news sites as well as on twitter, saying north korea appeared to have fired a missile at japan. it said the government was telling people to take shelter.the false alarm came two days after hawaii's emergency management department sent a mistaken warning of a north korean missile attack to mobile phones across the state, triggering panic.nhk deleted its tweet after several minutes, issued a correction and apologized several times on air. it said a mistake in using the alert system caused the error.






hawaii missile-attack false alarm triggered by clicking wrong button, official s


on saturday morning, just after 8 a.m. local time, a hawaii state employee hit the wrong button on a computer during a shift change and accidentally sent an alert to many of the state’s cellphones that a ballistic missile was about to strike. for nearly 40 minutes, scores of hawaii residents thought their world was about to end.“ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii,” the alert said, in all-caps, to the island chain of about 1.4 million people. “seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill.”...






hawaii officials say missile alert was a mistake


hawaii gov. david ige said he was meeting with state officials saturday morning to find out how an alert was mistakenly sent to residents warning that a ballistic missile was bound for hawaii.the missile warning, broadcast to hawaiians’ cellphones, was a false alarm.ige said he was meeting with defense and emergency management officials to not only find out how the false alarm occurred, but also to make sure it doesn't happen again."the public must have confidence in our emergency alert system," ige said.hawaii sen. brian schatz said the false alarm was caused by "human error" and was "totally inexcusable."schatz took to twitter after emergency management officials confirmed that the alert was a mistake, calling for accountability and an alert process that is foolproof.the alert warned of






hawaii missile-attack false alarm triggered by clicking wrong button, official s


the false alert of a ballistic missile attack that unleashed panic across hawaii on saturday morning was triggered when a state employee accidentally hit the wrong button on a computer, a state official said. hawaii residents received an alert at 8:07 a.m. local time that read “ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill.”richard...






a wave of panic rattles hawaii after false missile alert


the second recent blunder in hawaii's planning for a possible north korean nuclear attack left islanders shaken after an emergency alert warning of an imminent strike sounded on hundreds of thousands of cellphones.for nearly 40 minutes people waited. then came the second mobile alert: someone hit the wrong button, there was no missile.some people abandoned cars on the highway and others gathered in the interiors of their homes to wait for what seemed like the inevitable, a blast that would cause widespread death and destruction.the message sent statewide just after 8 a.m. saturday read: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."the hawaii emergency management agency's administrator, vern miyagi, said he took responsibility for the mistake. he






hawaii missile alert: how one employee 'pushed the wrong button' and caused a wa


news nation & world hawaii missile alert: how one employee 'pushed the wrong button' and caused a wave of panictor johnson / hawaii tourism authorityhawaii emergency officials say an alert of a ballistic missile threat was a false alarm.hawaii emergency officials say an alert of a ballistic missile threat was a false alarm. (tor johnson / hawaii tourism authority)amy b wangwashington postshortly after 8 a.m. local time saturday morning, an employee at the hawaii emergency management agency settled in at the start of his shift. among his duties that day was to initiate an internal test of the emergency missile warning system: essentially, to practice sending an emergency alert to the public without actually sending it to the public.it was a drill the agency had started with some regularity 






federal responsibility in nuclear attack alerts is unclear


honolulu — a timeline shows hawaii officials botched efforts to immediately correct a false missile alert over the weekend, taking more than 20 minutes to contact federal authorities for approval they didn't need and then taking another 15 minutes to cancel the alert that was sent to mobile devices statewide.the astonishing error and dismal response has prompted both state and federal investigations and left one of the state's u.s. senators wondering aloud if top brass at the hawaii emergency management agency should be replaced."i think (gov.) david ige has a tough decision in front of him, and it's his call," sen. brian schatz told reporters wednesday. either way, the state has a long road ahead in restoring the public's confidence in the alert system, the democrat said.nearly 40 terrify






hawaii officials apologize for 'mistake' after false emergency missile alert


a false alarm that warned of a ballistic missile headed for hawaii sent the islands into a panic saturday, with people abandoning cars in a highway and preparing to flee their homes until officials said the cellphone alert was a mistake.hawaii officials apologized repeatedly and said the alert was sent when someone hit the wrong button during a shift change. they vowed to ensure it would never happen again."we made a mistake," said hawaii emergency management agency administrator vern miyagi.for nearly 40 minutes, it seemed like the world was about to end in hawaii, an island paradise already jittery over the threat of nuclear-tipped missiles from north korea.the emergency alert, which was sent to cellphones statewide just before 8:10 a.m., said: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii






hawaii officials say inbound ballistic missile alert was a mistake


a mobile push alert that warned of an incoming ballistic missile to hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic saturday was a mistake, state emergency officials said.the emergency alert, which was sent to cellphones, typed in all caps, "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."hawaii emergency management agency spokesman richard repoza said it was a false alarm and the agency is trying to determine what happened.the alert caused a tizzy on the island and across social media.jamie malapit, owner of a honolulu hair salon, texted his clients that he was cancelling their appointments and was closing his shop for the day. he said he was still in bed when the phone started going off "like crazy." he thought it was a tsunami warning at first.






first hawaii, now japan sends a false alarm about incoming north korean missile


start your day with the news you need from the bay area and beyond. sign up for our new morning report weekday newsletter.by anna fifield | the washington postseoul, south korea – japanese public broadcaster nhk mistakenly sent an alert tuesday warning that north korea had fired a missile, just days after a similar mistake caused panic in hawaii.unlike in the hawaii case, however, this error took only five minutes to correct.“nhk news alert. north korea appears to have launched a missile,” nhk said in a notification sent through its app to mobile phone users at 6:55 p.m. tokyo time. “the government j-alert urges people to take shelter inside buildings or underground.”japan has an advanced warning system, known as j-alerts, that has traditionally been used for earthquakes but has, over the






the latest: hawaii's call to fema lasted just 1 minute


honolulu — the latest on a missile warning alert mistakenly sent in hawaii (all times local):3:35 p.m.hawaii's phone call to federal authorities to seek guidance after mistakenly sending an alert warning of a missile attack lasted only about a minute.the federal emergency management agency told the associated press wednesday that it received the call from hawaii at 8:30 a.m.hawaii emergency management agency spokesman lt. col. charles anthony says that call lasted approximately one minute.in the end, it took nearly 40 minutes after the first alert was sent for the state to send another mobile alert saying that there was no missile headed to hawaii.a missile launched from north korea would take about 20 minutes to hit hawaii.the state said part of the delay in sending the retraction was bec






tick tock of terror: timeline of hawaii missile alert snafu


honolulu — the missile alert mistakenly sent saturday by hawaii officials came just a few minutes after a shift change at state emergency operations center in diamond head crater. here's a timeline of what happened:8:05 a.m. — workers initiate routine test of the emergency alert system.8:07 a.m. — a worker mistakenly hits the button to send the emergency warning reading: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."8:10 a.m. — the head of the emergency management agency, state adjutant general maj. gen. joe logan, confirms with u.s. pacific command that there was no missile launch. honolulu police are notified of the false alarm.8:13 a.m. — the state issues a cancellation that prevents the message from being sent to phones that hadn't previously






japanese tv sends false alarm over north korea missile launch


the alert from nhk news, retracted minutes later, had advised japanese residents to evacuate and seek shelter.        






hawaii mistakenly alerts residents of inbound ballistic missile


a push alert that warned of a ballistic missile heading straight for hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic saturday was issued by mistake, state emergency officials said.the emergency alert, which was sent to cellphones just before 8:10 a.m., said in all caps, "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill." the hawaii emergency management agency tweeted that there was no threat about 10 minutes later. but a revised push alert stating there was no threat went out sometime after that.agency spokesman richard repoza confirmed it was a false alarm and the agency is trying to determine what happened.the incident prompted defense agencies including the pentagon and the u.s. pacific command to issue the same statement, that they had "detected






38 minutes of fear in hawaii


in 1938, orson welles panicked the nation with a false alarm about a martian invasion in the radio broadcast “the war of the worlds.” that was far-fetched, of course. but what happened on saturday, sadly, was not so hard to imagine … or believe.authorities sent an emergency alert to hawaiians’ cellphones: “ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill.”the possibility that a missile or missiles would land hung in the air for 38 minutes. that’s 38 long minutes while people sought shelter and reached out to relatives. we imagine some wondered if they’d ever hear the voices of their loved ones again.thankfully, it was a false alarm.in calmer times, such an alert might have been shrugged off by many people as a relic of the cold war. someone pushed the






hawaii sends out missile alert by mistake


image copyrighttwitterimage caption the message hawaiians saw on their phones people across the us state of hawaii received a text on saturday morning, warning of an impending missile strike. it was declared a false alarm shortly afterwards, but not before panic started to spread. "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill," read the message, all in capital letters. hawaii emergency management agency later confirmed there was no threat. in an online statement, honolulu police department said: "state warning point has issued a missile alert in error! there is no threat to the state of hawaii!" the honolulu star-advertiser said emergency officials had mistakenly sent the message out by text at 08:07 (18:07 gmt) before correcting the error by emai






a wave of panic rattles hawaii after false missile alert


the second recent blunder in hawaii's planning for a possible north korean nuclear attack left islanders shaken after an emergency alert warning of an imminent strike sounded on hundreds of thousands of cellphones.for nearly 40 minutes people waited. then came the second mobile alert: someone hit the wrong button, there was no missile.some people abandoned cars on the highway and others gathered in the interiors of their homes to wait for what seemed like the inevitable, a blast that would cause widespread death and destruction.the message sent statewide just after 8 a.m. saturday read: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."the hawaii emergency management agency's administrator, vern miyagi, said he took responsibility for the mistake. he






a wave of panic rattles hawaii after false missile alert


honolulu — the second recent blunder in hawaii's planning for a possible north korean nuclear attack left islanders shaken after an emergency alert warning of an imminent strike sounded on hundreds of thousands of cellphones.for nearly 40 minutes people waited. then came the second mobile alert: someone hit the wrong button, there was no missile.some people abandoned cars on the highway and others gathered in the interiors of their homes to wait for what seemed like the inevitable, a blast that would cause widespread death and destruction.the message sent statewide just after 8 a.m. saturday read: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."the hawaii emergency management agency's administrator, vern miyagi, said he took responsibility for the






hawaii officials mistakenly warn of inbound missile


by audrey mcavoy and jennifer kelleherhonolulu (ap) — a push alert that warned of a ballistic missile heading straight for hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic saturday was issued by mistake, state emergency officials said.the emergency alert, which was sent to cellphones just before 8:10 a.m., said in all caps, “ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill.” the hawaii emergency management agency tweeted that there was no threat about 10 minutes later. but a revised push alert stating there was no threat went out sometime after that.agency spokesman richard repoza confirmed it was a false alarm and the agency is trying to determine what happened.the incident prompted defense agencies including the pentagon and the u.s. pacific comman






federal responsibility in nuclear attack alerts is unclear


honolulu (ap) — a timeline shows hawaii officials botched efforts to immediately correct a false missile alert over the weekend, taking more than 20 minutes to contact federal authorities for approval they didn’t need and then taking another 15 minutes to cancel the alert that was sent to mobile devices statewide.one of the state’s u.s. senators is wondering aloud if top brass at the hawaii emergency management agency should be replaced.sen. brian schatz said wednesday that gov. david ige has a “tough decision in front of him” and that restoring the public’s confidence in the alert system is critical.the confusion raises questions about whether any state should be solely responsible for notifying the public of such an event.most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 for 4 weeks.






hawaii emergency officials say alert of ballistic missile threat was mistake


an alert caused a panic when it went to people's cellphones saturday morning about a missile strike, but shortly after, authorities said it was a mistake. photo credit: edwin lim by the associated pressupdated january 13, 2018 3:30 pm print see commentsshare share tweet share emailhonolulu - a push alert that warned of a ballistic missile heading straight for hawaii and sent residents into a full-blown panic saturday was issued by mistake, state emergency officials said.the emergency alert, which was sent to cellphones just before 8:10 a.m., said in all caps, "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill." the hawaii emergency management agency tweeted that there was threat about 10 minutes later. but a revised push alert stating there was no thre






missile-alert mistake feeds doubts about a real emergency


honolulu — a blunder that caused more than a million people in hawaii to fear that they were about to be struck by a nuclear missile fed skepticism sunday about the government's ability to keep them informed in a real emergency.residents and tourists alike remained rattled a day after the mistaken alert was blasted out to cellphones across the islands with a warning to seek immediate shelter and the ominous statement "this is not a drill.""my confidence in our so-called leaders' ability to disseminate this vital information has certainly been tarnished," said patrick day, who sprang from bed when the alert was issued saturday morning. "i would have to think twice before acting on any future advisory."authorities said the warning was sent during a shift change at the state's emergency manag






tick tock of terror: timeline of hawaii missile alert snafu


honolulu — the missile threat mistakenly sent saturday by hawaii officials came just a few minutes after a shift change at state emergency operations center in diamond head crater. here's a timeline of what happened:8:05 a.m. — workers initiate routine test of the emergency alert system.8:07 a.m. — a worker mistakenly hits the button to send the emergency warning reading: "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."8:10 a.m. — the head of the emergency management agency, state adjutant general maj. gen. joe logan, confirms with u.s. pacific command that there was no missile launch. honolulu police are notified of the false alarm.8:13 a.m. — the state issues a cancellation that prevents the message from being sent to phones that hadn't previousl






false ballistic missile alert rattles hawaii


the warning read, "ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill."        






‘inexcusable’ false ballistic missile alert in hawaii was caused by human error


hawaiian residents were briefly but intensely disturbed this morning by a state-wide alert via tv and phone warning of an incoming ballistic missile. it was, however, shortly afterwards confirmed to be a mistake caused by “human error.” hawaiian senator brian schatz called the false alarm “inexcusable” and said to expect “tough and quick accountability and a fixed process.”the alert went out at a little after 8 am hawaiian time, appearing on phones as an emergency services popup and broadcast on tv as a detailed warning of how to seek shelter. “this is not a drill,” it concluded.authorities quickly issued followups to calm the no doubt panicking populace, but i imagine it’s hard to do that properly when you’ve just told everyone in the state to seek shelter and lie on the floor.given the c






missile-alert mistake feeds doubts about a real emergency


honolulu — a blunder that caused more than a million people in hawaii to fear that they were about to be struck by a nuclear missile fed skepticism sunday about the government's ability to keep them informed in a real emergency.residents and tourists alike remained rattled a day after the mistaken alert was blasted out to cellphones across the islands with a warning to seek immediate shelter and the ominous statement "this is not a drill.""my confidence in our so-called leaders' ability to disseminate this vital information has certainly been tarnished," said patrick day, who sprang from bed when the alert was issued saturday morning. "i would have to think twice before acting on any future advisory."the erroneous warning was sent during a shift change at the state's emergency management a






false alarm on missile creates uneasy moment at sony open


honolulu (ap) — charles howell iii was eating breakfast in his hotel when the restaurant at the kahala started buzzing.everyone had their phones. everyone received the same push alert.“ballistic missile threat inbound to hawaii. seek immediate shelter. this is not a drill.”“all the alarms went off at the same time,” howell said. “it got everyone’s attention. i didn’t know what to do. we all stared at each other. it kind of shows you the world we live in now. your whole life can change in a second.”most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 for 4 weeks.the push alert turned out to be a mistake.the scare lasted only about 10 minutes, a little longer depending on the source of information.some players at least knew about rep. tulsi gabbard of hawaii, whose tweet that it was a false alarm m






how to troubleshoot an ethernet interface on a ubuntu server with ethtool


image: jack wallen ubuntu server is a powerful, reliable, and flexible platform—there is no end to what you can do with the operating system. for instance, if you like to tweak and tune your network, ubuntu server offers plenty of tools. one such networking tool is ethtool. with this command-line tool, you can query or control your network driver and hardware settings and troubleshoot problematic network hardware. for example, you can change the following and much more:auto-negotiationthe speed of the devicedisplay all nic settingsdisplay auto-negotiation, rx, and tx settingsdisplay network statistics for a specific nictroubleshoot ethernet connectionsblink the led of a specific niclet's explore how to use this must-know tool. notes: ethtool is not a new tool. also, ethtool is not specifi