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government, citing ruling, again will accept requests for daca protection


the federal government, citing a recent court order, said saturday night that it has resumed the acceptance of requests for grants of deferred action under the daca program. those under the immigration program have become known as "dreamers."the trump administration had planned to rescind work permits for the the young undocumented immigrants, insisting that it was for congress to find a solution to the issue of their status.daca stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals, and the trump administration had decided to end the projgram, calling it an an egregious example of executive overreach.but last week, a federal judge in california said the nearly 690,000 daca recipients must retain their work permits and their protection from deportation while a lawsuit moves forward. the suit c






government again will accept requests for daca protection


january 13, 2018, 10:12 pm san jose — from the time he was able to handle a ball — about 2 years old — tyler nii demonstrated his aptitude and passion for sports. the sports included basketball, golf, tennis, soccer, baseball and volleyball, said his mother, nancy nii. he wanted to do whatever his big brother, kevin, did. tyler nii, 27, a tennis coach at...






what is the government's word worth?


so what exactly is the government’s word worth? we’re about to find out.immigration and customs enforcement agents last month raided the home of a man in washington state for whom they had a deportation order. asleep in the same house was the man’s son, daniel ramirez medina, 23, who had been brought to the u.s. at age 7 and who, under president obama’s deferred action for childhood arrivals program, has been granted permission to remain and work in the country. when the ice agents asked where he was born, ramirez told them, “mexico,” but added that he had received a deferral from deportation under daca.what happened next is under dispute, but after a brief conversation in which the agents say ramirez told them he was in the country illegally, ramirez was taken into custody. he now sits in






mexican woman’s deportation protection temporarily restored


atlanta (ap) — a federal judge in georgia has temporarily restored protection from deportation to a mexican woman who became a well-known figure in the illegal immigration debate as a college student seven years ago.u.s. district judge mark cohen on monday ordered the federal government to temporarily reinstate jessica colotl’s protection under the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, known as daca. immigration authorities last month terminated her protected status.cohen’s order instructs federal authorities to reconsider the termination of colotl’s daca status and her application for renewal of that status. he ordered that her daca status, including authorization to work in the u.s., be restored while that reconsideration is pending.colotl, who’s now 29, was brought to the u.s.






hopes and fears: one daca recipient’s story


michel nievesoff to the side of interstate 10, somewhere in between las cruces and el paso, michel nieves lives in a house with his parents and four siblings.nieves, 20, and two older siblings have protection under the deferred action for childhood arrivals program. his 16-year-old sister is awaiting approval. his 5-year-old sister is the only u.s. citizen in the household.nieves and his two siblings are three of more than 7,000 recipients in new mexico and up to 800,000 across the nation affected by the trump administration’s sept. 5 decision to end daca if congress doesn’t pass a permanent fix by march 2018, according to the migration policy institute.in michel’s living room, pictures of four children in caps and gowns embellish the orange pastel walls. they include his youngest sister w






hopes and fears: one daca recipient’s story


michel nievesoff to the side of interstate 10, somewhere in between las cruces and el paso, michel nieves lives in a house with his parents and four siblings.nieves, 20, and two older siblings have protection under the deferred action for childhood arrivals program. his 16-year-old sister is awaiting approval. his 5-year-old sister is the only u.s. citizen in the household.nieves and his two siblings are three of more than 7,000 recipients in new mexico and up to 800,000 across the nation affected by the trump administration’s sept. 5 decision to end daca if congress doesn’t pass a permanent fix by march 2018, according to the migration policy institute.in michel’s living room, pictures of four children in caps and gowns embellish the orange pastel walls. they include his youngest sister w






federal agency returns to accepting requests under daca


washington (ap) — citizenship and immigration services says it’s resumed accepting requests to renew a grant of deferred action under the obama-era program that shields from deportation young immigrants brought to the u.s. as children and who remain in the country illegally.the decision comes four days after a federal judge, in a nod to pending lawsuits, temporarily blocked the trump administration’s decision to end the program.in a statement posted saturday on its website, the uscis says the policy under the deferred actions for childhood arrivals program, or daca, will be operated under the terms in place before it was rescinded in september.congressional lawmakers are trying to write legislation to give the so-called dreamers legal status.most read storiesunlimited digital access. $1 fo






six 'dreamers' sue trump to block repeal of daca


six california beneficiaries of the deferred action for childhood arrivals program sued the trump administration monday for rescinding protections for young immigrants without legal status.in the 46-page suit filed in u.s. district court in san francisco just after midnight, the so-called dreamers claimed trump’s decision to phase out the daca program over the next six months “was motivated by unconstitutional bias against mexicans and latinos.” the federal daca program shields from deportation nearly 800,000 immigrants who were brought to the u.s. illegally as children, providing recipients with renewable two-year work permits.the lawsuit seeks to block the trump administration from ending the program.the dreamers argue that the government, in asking the program’s vulnerable applicants to






tech industry fights trump over daca, dreamer protection program


tech leaders from amazon's jeff bezos to google's sundar pichai called on trump and congress to preserve daca and pass legislation protecting dreamers.        






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deportations of disqualified 'dreamers' have surged under trump


the number of “dreamers” deported after being brought illegally to the united states as children and losing their protected status because of criminal behavior appears to have soared in the first few months of the trump administration.according to data released this week by the department of homeland security, 43 immigrants whose protection under the deferred action for childhood arrivals (daca) program was terminated were deported during the first two months of the trump presidency, from jan. 20 to march 25.that’s a much higher proportion than under president obama, when former dreamers were being deported at a rate of about seven a month since the program got underway in september 2012.president trump has stated his administration will not target daca, an obama-era program that allows im






essential education: educators' big response to the daca decision


the university of california's chief immigration legal expert urged students who have received government reprieves from deportation to stay calm in the face of president trump's announcement tuesday that he plans to phase out daca protections. maria blanco, who heads the uc immigrant legal services center, said a major lobbying campaign will try to push congress to extend the protections to nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally or fell out of legal status. under the obama-era deferred action for childhood arrivals program, deportation proceedings have been suspended against young immigrants brought to the country before age 16 who stayed in school and out of trouble. the young people also have been allowed to obtain work permits. "we have a very good sh






what will the end of deferred action mean?


dreams on hold: the impact of the end of daca? maria hernandez struggles to retain family ties after daca ends | 5:26maria hernandez, 25, was detained at a checkpoint in sarita, tx on sept. 17, 2017. hernandez, a daca recipient has since feared not being able to continue to visit family in alamo, tx, since daca was rescinded sept. 5, 2017. courtney sacco/caller-times






essential education: trump will phase out daca, pending action from congress


the university of california's chief immigration legal expert urged students who have received government reprieves from deportation to stay calm in the face of president trump's announcement tuesday that he plans to phase out daca protections. maria blanco, who heads the uc immigrant legal services center, said a major lobbying campaign will try to push congress to extend the protections to nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally or fell out of legal status. under the obama-era deferred action for childhood arrivals program, deportation proceedings have been suspended against young immigrants brought to the country before age 16 who stayed in school and out of trouble. the young people also have been allowed to obtain work permits. "we have a very good sh






essential education: trump will phase out daca, pending action from congress


the university of california's chief immigration legal expert urged students who have received government reprieves from deportation to stay calm in the face of president trump's announcement tuesday that he plans to phase out daca protections. maria blanco, who heads the uc immigrant legal services center, said a major lobbying campaign will try to push congress to extend the protections to nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally or fell out of legal status. under the obama-era deferred action for childhood arrivals program, deportation proceedings have been suspended against young immigrants brought to the country before age 16 who stayed in school and out of trouble. the young people also have been allowed to obtain work permits. "we have a very good sh






uc's chief immigration legal expert urges daca beneficiaries to stay calm


the university of california's chief immigration legal expert urged students who have received government reprieves from deportation to stay calm in the face of president trump's announcement tuesday that he plans to phase out daca protections. maria blanco, who heads the uc immigrant legal services center, said a major lobbying campaign will try to push congress to extend the protections to nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally or fell out of legal status. under the obama-era deferred action for childhood arrivals program, deportation proceedings have been suspended against young immigrants brought to the country before age 16 who stayed in school and out of trouble. the young people also have been allowed to obtain work permits. "we have a very good sh






everything you need to know about daca and current immigration policy


alex nowrasteh is is an immigration policy analyst at the cato institute’s center for global liberty and prosperity. on this episode of federalist radio, nowrasteh and domenech discuss the details of daca, trump’s changing stances on immigration, and political sides with immigration as a whole.“the practical effect is that most [on daca] that are probably going to expire are basically going to be given another two years [to renew], and then beginning in march about 1,000 people on daca a day will lose their status,” nowrasteh said.many hill staffers believe this sets up congress for a clean daca vote in december. “i think it’s unlikely for congress to pass anything in the next six months to address this,” he said. “i think the best shot it’s got is a clean dream act.”






daca dreamers: us scraps young undocumented immigrants scheme


image copyrightafpimage caption activists prayed on the mexican side of the us border for the daca programme to be retained an obama-era scheme to protect young undocumented immigrants is being scrapped, us attorney general jeff sessions has announced.no first-time applications for the deferred action for childhood arrivals (daca) programme will be acted on after tuesday, the government confirmed.however, existing recipients will not be affected for at least six months.the scheme protected some 800,000 so-called "dreamers", mostly latin americans, from deportation.they were able to apply for work and study permits under a policy which, critics said, amounted to an amnesty for illegal immigrants.media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionharvey hero now faces daca deportationu






california will file separate lawsuit over end of daca program, attorney general


california plans its own lawsuit against the federal government because it is disproportionately harmed by president trump's plan to end the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, atty. gen. xavier becerra said wednesday.becerra outlined his plans after 15 other states, including new york and washington, filed their own lawsuit wednesday challenging the end of the daca program, which protects children who were brought into the country illegally from deportation.with a quarter of the 800,000 daca participants coming from california, the state and its economy will be hurt more than other states, officials argue.“california will sue the trump administration over its termination of the daca program for one simple reason,” becerra said. “our state has become the world’s 6th largest eco






those deported to mexico protested outside the u.s. embassy in mexico over trump


protests against president trump's decision to end a program for young immigrants extended to mexico city, where activists demonstrated outside the u.s. embassy."out with trump! save daca!" the protesters chanted tuesday as armed security officers stood guard.the protest was hastily organized by migrant advocates in mexico after the white house announced that young people currently shielded from deportation and allowed to work legally in the u.s. will begin losing their protection in march unless congress acts before then.the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, or daca, protects nearly 800,000 young people who were brought to the u.s. as children, often known as dreamers. nearly 80% of them were born in mexico and could be deported here. many of those demonstrating in mexico ci






essential education: devos solicits suggestions on sexual assault guidance


the university of california's chief immigration legal expert urged students who have received government reprieves from deportation to stay calm in the face of president trump's announcement tuesday that he plans to phase out daca protections. maria blanco, who heads the uc immigrant legal services center, said a major lobbying campaign will try to push congress to extend the protections to nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the country illegally or fell out of legal status. under the obama-era deferred action for childhood arrivals program, deportation proceedings have been suspended against young immigrants brought to the country before age 16 who stayed in school and out of trouble. the young people also have been allowed to obtain work permits. "we have a very good sh






with daca under the gun, all eyes are on trump


for many dreamers, questions about the fate of a program that protects them from deportation have morphed from “will he or won’t he?” to “when?" as rumors grow that president donald trump may end the program as soon as this week.from california’s attorney general to a uc san diego professor, those hoping to protect dreamers have rallied to defend the deferred action for childhood arrivals, or daca, program, created under former president barack obama. those who supported trump for his immigration campaign platform are hoping that the current president will keep his promise to get rid of the program.unauthorized immigrants who came to the u.s. as children and meet certain education and security requirements can apply for daca, which gives them two-year, renewable protection from deportation






what is daca? a look at rescinded immigrant programme | usa news


the programme that protects young immigrants who were brought to the us without documents as children or came with families who overstayed visas has been rescinded.but many questions remain about what will happen to the programme's beneficiaries. attorney general jeff sessions said deferred action for childhood arrivals, or daca, will end in six months to give congress time to find a legislative solution.here's a look at daca and what happens next for the nearly 800,000 people in it who are allowed to work in the us and receive protection from deportation.daca was created by then-president barack obama in 2012 after intense pressure from advocates who wanted protections for the young immigrants who were mostly raised in the us but lacked legal status.the programme protects them from deport






what is daca? a look at rescinded immigrant programme | usa news


the programme that protects young immigrants who were brought to the us without documents as children or came with families who overstayed visas has been rescinded.but many questions remain about what will happen to the programme's beneficiaries. attorney general jeff sessions said deferred action for childhood arrivals, or daca, will end in six months to give congress time to find a legislative solution.here's a look at daca and what happens next for the nearly 800,000 people in it who are allowed to work in the us and receive protection from deportation.daca was created by then-president barack obama in 2012 after intense pressure from advocates who wanted protections for the young immigrants who were mostly raised in the us but lacked legal status.the programme protects them from deport






what is daca?


daca allows two-year stays for certain undocumented immigrants who entered the country before their 16th birthday.        






some in conservative media laud trump's decision to end daca


the end is nearing for a program that’s benefited so-called dreamers.president trump’s announcement that six months from now he’ll terminate the deferred action for childhood arrivals program, commonly known as daca, has been widely assailed by democrats and even some republicans. trump’s response? congress needs to act. the move by trump has, however, seen praise from conservative media.here are some headlines:  14 things the msm won’t tell you about daca(breitbart)for months, the right-wing website has urged trump to act on immigration and, among other things, end daca. and in recent weeks, with stephen k. bannon, trump’s former senior advisor who was fired last month, back in charge of the website, it has published several pieces calling on trump to get tough on illegal immigration.this






what is daca and why might trump end it?


daca allows two-year stays for certain undocumented immigrants who entered the country before their 16th birthday.        






what is daca and who does it protect?


daca allows two-year stays for certain undocumented immigrants who entered the country before their 16th birthday.        






what is daca and who does it protect?


daca allows two-year stays for certain undocumented immigrants who entered the country before their 16th birthday.        






daca ruling gives hope, but no resolution to dreamers


(click here, if you are unable to view this video on your mobile device.)despite this victory, iriana luna’s excruciating wait continues.a momentous court ruling blocking the trump administration from rescinding the deferred action for child arrivals program buoyed the spirits of hundreds of thousands of young, undocumented immigrants across the country late tuesday. but yet again, the celebration felt fleeting for luna and the others who look to congress and the white house to come up with permanent protections that would keep them in the country they call home.pro-immigrant activists and politicians acknowledged that while the san francisco district court ruling handed “dreamers” a significant victory, it isn’t enough to keep them in the country permanently.“it’s a good step forward for






what is daca? a look at rescinded immigrant programme | usa news


president donald trump has rescinded the programme that protects young immigrants who entered the united states illegally as minors or came with families who overstayed visas.but many questions remain about what will happen to the programme's beneficiaries. attorney general jeff sessions said deferred action for childhood arrivals, or daca, will end in six months, to give congress time to find a legislative solution.here's a look at daca and what happens next for the nearly 800,000 people on it who are allowed to work in the us and receive protection from deportation.daca was created by former president barack obama in 2012 after intense pressure from advocates who wanted protections for the young immigrants who were mostly raised in the us but lacked legal status.the programme protects th






as trump phases out daca, here's what it means


nearly 800,000 dreamers who had protections under daca will now try to figure out how to remain in school, at their jobs or in the military.        






what is daca and who are the us 'dreamers'? | usa news


us president donald trump's announcement of his immigration policy priorities has thrown further doubt over the future of the us' 800,000 "dreamers".the plans, revealed by the white house in october, tie future legal protection of "dreamer" immigrants to funding for trump's controversial border wall with mexico and increased spending on immigration enforcement officers.al jazeera answers some of the key questions about some of those who may be facing deportation as a result of the us president's recent announcements.watch: 'dreamers' respond to daca endingwho are the dreamers?the dreamers are some 800,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the us as children.they have been permitted to stay in the country because of the deferred action for childhood arrivals (daca) legislation introduced






google: requests for users' data have soared, so we need new cross-border rules


although google is processing more requests, it's also producing data for a smaller share of them. image: google government requests for google user data in the second half of 2016 were the highest since the firm first reported the figures in 2009.as google notes in its latest transparency report, it received 45,549 government requests for user data in the second half of 2016, of which about 31,000 or 70 percent were from non-us governments. in 2009 it received 12,000 requests in total, with a similar proportion coming from non-us governments. although google is processing more requests, it's also producing data for a smaller share of these requests. in 2010 it produced some user data for 76 percent of requests, a figure that's steadily fallen in each period to 60 percent in the second hal






google: requests for users' data have soared, so we need new cross-border rules


although google is processing more requests, it's also producing data for a smaller share of them. image: google government requests for google user data in the second half of 2016 were the highest since the company first reported the figures in 2009.as google notes in its latest transparency report, it received 45,549 government requests for user data in the second half of 2016, of which about 31,000 or 70 percent were from non-us governments. in 2009, it received 12,000 requests in total, with a similar proportion coming from non-us governments. although google is processing more requests, it's also producing data for a smaller share of these requests. in 2010, it produced some user data for 76 percent of requests, a figure that's steadily fallen in each period to 60 percent in the secon






linkedin received 150 government data requests in second half of 2016


file photo linkedin released its most recent transparency report tuesday and revealed that it received 150 government requests for data during the second half of 2016. must read digital transformation: making it work in the real world it takes more than shiny new technologies to remake business processes. here are a few ideas on how to make digital transformation projects work in your organisation.the 150 requests covered user 373 accounts. linkedin said it complied with roughly 73 percent of government requests, which means some data was provided for 211 user accounts. out of the 150 total requests, 135 came from the us government, with brazil and india the only other countries with more than one request. none of india's requests were granted, but four out of brazil's five requests were g






save on the 10' model of anker's super durable powerline+ lightning cable


anker 10' powerline+ lightning cable, $15anker’s kevlar-w ped powerline lightning cables are some of the most popular we’ve ever posted, and the 10' model of the even more durable powerline+ is marked down to $15 today on amazon in red, a dollar away from the all-time low.anker’s ultra-durable lightning cables join their best in cl batteries on our list of… read more read moreobviously, this isn’t a cable you’ll want to travel everywhere with, but if you want to be able to charge your phone or tablet while sitting on the couch, or if your nightstand is far away from the nearest outlet, an extra-long cable is exactly what you need. $15 from amazon2574 purchased by readersgizmodo media group may get a commissionbuy now