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facebook, twitter, youtube praised for “steady progress” quashing illegal hate s


facebook, twitter and youtube are likely to be breathing a little easier in europe after getting a pat on the back from regional lawmakers for making “steady progress” on removing illegal hate speech.last week the european commission warned it could still draw up legislation to try to ensure illegal content is removed from online platforms if tech firms do not step up their efforts.germany has already done so for, implementing a regime of fines of up to €50m for social media firms that fail to promptly remove illegal hate speech, though the ec is generally eyeing a wider mix of illegal content when it talks tough on this topic — including terrorist propaganda and even copyrighted material.today, on the specific issue of illegal hate speech on social media, it was sounding happy with the cu






facebook, twitter, youtube praised for “steady progress” quashing illegal hate s


facebook, twitter and youtube are likely to be breathing a little easier in europe after getting a pat on the back from regional lawmakers for making “steady progress” on removing illegal hate speech.last week the european commission warned it could still draw up legislation to try to ensure illegal content is removed from online platforms if tech firms do not step up their efforts.germany has already done so for, implementing a regime of fines of up to €50m for social media firms that fail to promptly remove illegal hate speech, though the ec is generally eyeing a wider mix of illegal content when it talks tough on this topic — including terrorist propaganda and even copyrighted material.today, on the specific issue of illegal hate speech on social media, it was sounding happy with the cu






social media giants making progress on illegal hate speech takedowns: ec


it’s been a year since the four major social platform players agreed with europe’s executive body to a voluntary code of conduct for removing illegal hate speech within 24 hours of a complaint being received.a lot has happened on this front since then, with a series of content moderation scandals hitting different platforms and serving to ramp up the regional pressure on the tech giants — including youtube suffering an advertiser backlash over ads being served up next to extremist content; and facebook accused of a series of moderation failures, including around child abuse and terrorist content. not to mention fake news gate.in germany the government is now leaning towards legislating to levy fines of up to €50 million on social media platforms if they do not remove illegal hate speech pr






social media giants making progress on illegal hate speech takedowns: ec


it’s been a year since the four major social platform players agreed with europe’s executive body to a voluntary code of conduct for removing illegal hate speech within 24 hours of a complaint being received.a lot has happened on this front since then, with a series of content moderation scandals hitting different platforms and serving to ramp up the regional pressure on the tech giants — including youtube suffering an advertiser backlash over ads being served up next to extremist content; and facebook accused of a series of moderation failures, including around child abuse and terrorist content. not to mention fake news gate.in germany the government is now leaning towards legislating to levy fines of up to €50 million on social media platforms if they do not remove illegal hate speech pr






social media companies step up removals of online hate speech: eu


social media companies like facebook, twitter and google’s youtube have stepped up both the speed and number of removals of hate speech on their platforms in response to eu pressure to do more to tackle the issue, results of an eu evaluation seen by reuters.facebook, twitter, youtube and microsoft last year signed up to a voluntary code of conduct to take action in europe within 24 hours, following rising concerns about the proliferation of racist and xenophobic content on social media triggered by the refugee crisis and attacks in western europe.this included removing or disabling access to the content if necessary, better cooperation with civil society organizations and the promotion of “counter-narratives” to hate speech.facebook assessed notifications of hateful content in less than 24






eu cheers tech giants’ commitment to tackling online hate speech


alphabet inc.’s youtube, facebook inc., twitter inc. and microsoft corp. have doubled their efforts over the past six months to remove hate speech and other information that incites acts of terror from their platforms, the european union said thursday.the assessment is welcome news for the companies, which face growing pressure from europe’s national governments to do more to address racist and xenophobic content.the eu...






facebook, twitter fight back: 'draft hate speech law will gag free expression'


the german parliament still needs to pass the proposed law, which would bring in huge fines for web firms that don't deal with hate speech and other illegal content. image: getty a coalition of tech companies and human rights groups has pushed back against a proposed hate-speech law in germany, arguing that it could have "grave consequences for the right to freedom of expression in germany, across the european union, and worldwide".german chancellor angela merkel's cabinet approved the proposal, drafted by justice minister heiko maas, earlier in april. it now needs the german parliament's green light, which must come soon because federal elections are due in september.if passed, the law would allow fines of up to €50m ($54m) for web firms that don't properly deal with hate speech and other






youtube: more ai can fix ai-generated “bubbles of hate”


facebook, youtube and twitter faced another online hate crime grilling today by uk parliamentarians visibly frustrated at their continued failures to apply their own community guidelines and take down reported hate speech.the uk government has this year pushed to raise online radicalization and extremist content as a g7 priority — and has been pushing for takedown timeframes for extremist content to shrink radically.while the broader issue of online hate speech has continued to be a hot button political issue, especially in europe — with germany passing a social media hate speech law in october. and the european union’s executive body pushing for social media firms to automate the flagging of illegal content to accelerate takedowns.in may, the uk’s home affairs committee also urged the gov






youtube: more ai can fix ai-generated ‘bubbles of hate’


facebook, youtube and twitter faced another online hate crime grilling today by uk parliamentarians visibly frustrated at their continued failures to apply their own community guidelines and take down reported hate speech.the uk government has this year pushed to raise online radicalization and extremist content as a g7 priority — and has been pushing for takedown timeframes for extremist content to shrink radically.while the broader issue of online hate speech has continued to be a hot button political issue, especially in europe — with germany passing a social media hate speech law in october. and the european union’s executive body pushing for social media firms to automate the flagging of illegal content to accelerate takedowns.in may, the uk’s home affairs committee also urged the gov






social media firms should face fines for hate speech failures, urge uk mps


social media giants facebook, youtube and twitter have once again been accused of taking a “laissez-faire approach” to moderating hate speech content on their platforms.this follows a stepping up of political rhetoric against social platforms in recent months in the uk, following a terror attack in london in march — after which home secretary amber rudd called for tech firms to do more to help block the spread of terrorist content online.in a highly critical report looking at the spread of hate, abuse and extremism on facebook, youtube and twitter, a uk parliamentary committee has suggested the government looks at imposing fines on social media forms for content moderation failures.it’s also calling for a review of existing legislation to ensure clarity about how the law applies in this ar






social media firms should face fines for hate speech failures, urge uk mps


social media giants facebook, youtube and twitter have once again been accused of taking a “laissez-faire approach” to moderating hate speech content on their platforms.this follows a stepping up of political rhetoric against social platforms in recent months in the uk, following a terror attack in london in march — after which home secretary amber rudd called for tech firms to do more to help block the spread of terrorist content online.in a highly critical report looking at the spread of hate, abuse and extremism on facebook, youtube and twitter, a uk parliamentary committee has suggested the government looks at imposing fines on social media forms for content moderation failures.it’s also calling for a review of existing legislation to ensure clarity about how the law applies in this ar






facebook, google fight back: 'draft hate speech law will gag free expression'


the german parliament still needs to pass the proposed law, which would bring in huge fines for web firms that don't deal with hate speech and other illegal content. image: getty a coalition of tech companies and human rights groups has pushed back against a proposed hate-speech law in germany, arguing that it could have "grave consequences for the right to freedom of expression in germany, across the european union, and worldwide".german chancellor angela merkel's cabinet approved the proposal, drafted by justice minister heiko maas, earlier in april. it now needs the german parliament's green light, which must come soon because federal elections are due in september.what's hot on zdnetif passed, the law would allow fines of up to €50m ($54m) for web firms that don't properly deal with ha






facebook, google fight back: 'draft hate speech law will gag free expression'


the german parliament still needs to pass the proposed law, which would bring in huge fines for web firms that don't deal with hate speech and other illegal content. image: getty a coalition of tech companies and human rights groups has pushed back against a proposed hate-speech law in germany, arguing that it could have "grave consequences for the right to freedom of expression in germany, across the european union, and worldwide".german chancellor angela merkel's cabinet approved the proposal, drafted by justice minister heiko maas, earlier in april. it now needs the german parliament's green light, which must come soon because federal elections are due in september.if passed, the law would allow fines of up to €50m ($54m) for web firms that don't properly deal with hate speech and other






online giants must bolster free speech against abuse, or watch innovation die


when thousands, perhaps millions, of people use social networks to spread hate speech, online harassment and abuse, the problem might often seem insurmountable. but whatever approaches are being used to address the problem, something, somewhere is clearly not working. youtube videos by extremists and terrorists abound. targeted harassment and trolling on twitter remains to this day, years and years after you might reasonably have thought they might get it right. facebook almost automatically removes women who breast feed their children and yet seems to shrug its shoulders over fake news, which might move an entire election, spreading on its network.it’s no wonder politicians feel justified in saying enough is enough.the news last week that the german government had proposed fining facebook






facebook, twitter could face big fines over defamatory posts


top of the order:  a fine time ahead?: by now, it’s almost impossible to get through a single day without hearing something about hate speech or “fake news” or other defamatory postings on social-networking sites. and it’s also almost impossible to get through a day without hearing about social-networking companies’ efforts to fight back against such speech, which can be mean-spirited at best, and potentially illegal at worst.but, for some, those attempts to fight back against hate speech just aren’t moving fast enough. and one of those who wants to call facebook, twitter and other social-networking companies on the carpet is heiko maas, the justice minister of germany.on tuesday, maas laid out a proposed new law in germany that would impose fines of up to $53 million (or, roughly 50 milli






facebook grilled on britain first page by mps


image copyrightreutersimage caption yvette cooper read out a series of abusive threats made to mps on twitter facebook has said it is reviewing the future of britain first's profile page, following the removal of its leaders' pages from twitter.the social network said it was "very cautious" about removing political speech.the details emerged as the home affairs committee grilled facebook, google and twitter on what they were doing to combat hate speech.mps said the firms had made progress but were still not doing enough.google promised an annual transparency report on the issue. facebook and twitter said they were looking at a similar course of action but did not commit to it.on britain first, a far-right group, facebook's director of public policy simon milner said it was reviewing its fu






ecj to rule on whether facebook needs to hunt for hate speech


austria’s supreme court is referring a legal challenge over the extent of facebook’s responsibility to remove hate speech postings to europe’s top court for an opinion (via derstandard.at). the case has clear implications for freedom of speech online.the original lawsuit against facebook was filed by the former leader of the austrian green party, eva glawischnig, in 2016, after she had sought to have what she claimed were defamatory postings removed from the site (and facebook had refused to take them down).last may an austrian appeals court found in her favor, ruling that facebook must remove the hate speech postings — both the original posts and any verbatim repostings of the same comments — and also must do so worldwide, not merely geoblocking access to them in austria.austria’s supreme






ecj to rule on whether facebook needs to hunt for hate speech


austria’s supreme court is referring a legal challenge over the extent of facebook’s responsibility to remove hate speech postings to europe’s top court for an opinion (via derstandard.at). the case has clear implications for freedom of speech online.the original lawsuit against facebook was filed by the former leader of the austrian green party, eva glawischnig, in 2016, after she had sought to have what she claimed were defamatory postings removed from the site (and facebook had refused to take them down).last may an austrian appeals court found in her favor, ruling that facebook must remove the hate speech postings — both the original posts and any verbatim repostings of the same comments — and also must do so worldwide, not merely geoblocking access to them in austria.austria’s supreme






facebook, twitter and google grilled by mps over hate speech


image copyrightpaimage caption executives from google, facebook and twitter (l-r) were questioned by the home affairs select committee social media giants should "do a better job" to protect users from online hate speech, mps have said.executives from facebook, twitter and google were asked by the home affairs select committee why they did not police their content more effectively, given the billions they made.they were told they had a "terrible reputation" for dealing with problems.the firms said they worked hard to make sure freedom of expression was protected within the law.'money out of hate'labour mp chuka umunna focused his questioning on google-owned youtube, which he accused of making money from "videos peddling hate" on its platform. a recent investigation by the times found adver






facebook, twitter and google grilled by mps over hate speech


image copyrightpaimage caption executives from google, facebook and twitter (l-r) were questioned by the home affairs select committee social media giants should "do a better job" to protect users from online hate speech, mps have said.executives from facebook, twitter and google were asked by the home affairs select committee why they did not police their content more effectively, given the billions they made.they were told they had a "terrible reputation" for dealing with problems.the firms said they worked hard to make sure freedom of expression was protected within the law.'money out of hate'labour mp chuka umunna focused his questioning on google-owned youtube, which he accused of making money from "videos peddling hate" on its platform. a recent investigation by the times found adver






facebook, twitter and google grilled by mps over hate speech


image copyrightpaimage caption executives from google, facebook and twitter (l-r) were questioned by the home affairs select committee social media giants should "do a better job" to protect users from online hate speech, mps have said.executives from facebook, twitter and google were asked by the home affairs select committee why they did not police their content more effectively, given the billions they made.they were told they had a "terrible reputation" for dealing with problems.the firms said they worked hard to make sure freedom of expression was protected within the law.'money out of hate'labour mp chuka umunna focused his questioning on google-owned youtube, which he accused of making money from "videos peddling hate" on its platform. a recent investigation by the times found adver






sorry, college kids, there's no such thing as hate speech


for the sake of campus protestors and their professors across the country, it’s time to make something clear: there’s no such thing as hate speech.that should go without saying, since freedom of speech and free inquiry is supposed to be what college is all about. but the recent spate of violent student protests, from the university of california at berkeley to middlebury college in vermont, have met a collective shrug from an alarming number of college students, professors, and administrators who seem to be under the impression that violence is okay so long as its purpose is to silence “hate speech.”by hate speech, they mean ideas and opinions that run afoul of progressive pieties. do you believe abortion is the taking of human life? that’s hate speech. think transgenderism is a form of me






sorry, college kids, there's no such thing as hate speech


for the sake of campus protestors and their professors across the country, it’s time to make something clear: there’s no such thing as hate speech.that should go without saying, since freedom of speech and free inquiry is supposed to be what college is all about. but the recent spate of violent student protests, from the university of california at berkeley to middlebury college in vermont, have been met with a collective shrug from an alarming number of college students, professors, and administrators who seem to be under the impression that violence is okay so long as its purpose is to silence “hate speech.”by hate speech, they mean ideas and opinions that run afoul of progressive pieties. do you believe abortion is the taking of human life? that’s hate speech. think transgenderism is a






scouring facebook for disturbing content: how risk to moderators is raising conc


facebook contractors have to go through posts to judge whether they violate community standards and need to be removed. image: hale erguvenc/getty images a german facebook contractor whose employees scour posts for graphic images received a surprise visit from berlin's health and safety authorities, it has emerged.arvato, a subsidiary of media giant bertelsmann, has provided content moderation services for facebook since late 2015. at that point, the team included about 100 people. but now arvato employs some 600 workers in berlin, whose task is to respond to reports made by facebook's users of illegal content on the social network. microsoft, facebook, twitter and google submit to eu hate speech rules the companies have agreed to tackle hate speech online.the arvato employees have to go t






scouring facebook for disturbing content: how risk to moderators is raising conc


video: facebook post-scanning teams in germany to get extra psychological carea german facebook contractor whose employees scour posts for graphic images received a surprise visit from berlin's health and safety authorities, it has emerged.arvato, a subsidiary of media giant bertelsmann, has provided content moderation services for facebook since late 2015. at that point, the team included about 100 people. but now arvato employs some 600 workers in berlin, whose task is to respond to reports made by facebook's users of illegal content on the social network. microsoft, facebook, twitter and google submit to eu hate speech rules the companies have agreed to tackle hate speech online.the arvato employees have to go through numerous posts, to judge whether they violate facebook's community st






germany passes law against online hate speech


berlin — german lawmakers approved a bill on friday aimed at cracking down on hate speech on social networks, which critics say could have drastic consequences for free speech online.the measure approved is designed to enforce the country's existing limits on speech, including the long-standing ban on holocaust denial. among other things, it would fine social networking sites up to 50 million euros ($56 million) if they persistently fail to remove illegal content within a week, including defamatory "fake news.""freedom of speech ends where the criminal law begins," said justice minister heiko maas, who was the driving force behind the bill.maas said official figures showed the number of hate crimes in germany increased by over 300 percent in the last two years.social media platforms such a






the moment a famous refugee meets a right-wing nationalist


a syrian refugee and a candidate for a right-wing nationalist party disagree about a new german law that promises to crack down on hate speech online. what happened when they met in real life?more on hate speech and germany's tough new law: the lawyer who takes on facebook over free speechvideo journalist: jan bruckyou can follow bbc trending on twitter @bbctrending, and find us on facebook. all our stories are at bbc.com/trending.






is false speech free speech?


to the editor: although it is correct and important to say that “hate speech” is legally protected, this op-ed article is misleading. (“actually, hate speech is protected speech,” opinion, june 8)for instance, in the famous supreme court decision in schenck vs. united states in 1919, the constitutional principle about not “shouting fire in a crowded theater” is not actually bad law as suggested. nor is it accurate to suggest that such speech is illegal or unethical only if it is false.a better example is from the libertarian philosopher john stuart mill: it is still criminal to incite mob violence or carnage at the house of a corn dealer even if the speech there is true. another reason not to make truth or falsity the test of protected speech is that what was once thought false might turn






germany to social networks: delete hate speech faster or face fines


berlin—german lawmakers passed legislation friday that would fine social-media companies up to $57 million if they fail to quickly delete hate speech, libel and other illegal content, one of the most aggressive efforts in the west to regulate content posted online. alphabet inc.’s google, facebook inc. and civil-rights groups criticized the law, warning it would stifle freedom of speech by encouraging social networks to delete...






germany to social networks: delete hate speech faster or face fines


berlin—german lawmakers are set to pass legislation friday to fine social-media companies up to $57 million for failing to quickly delete hate speech, libel and other illegal content, one of the most aggressive efforts in the west to regulate content posted online. alphabet inc.’s google, facebook inc. and civil-rights groups criticized the law, warning it would stifle freedom of speech by encouraging social networks to delete...






germany starts enforcing hate speech law


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption facebook is one of the social media companies affected by netzdg germany is set to start enforcing a law that demands social media sites move quickly to remove hate speech, fake news and illegal material.sites that do not remove "obviously illegal" posts could face fines of up to 50m euro (£44.3m).the law gives the networks 24 hours to act after they have been told about law-breaking material.social networks and media sites with more than two million members will fall under the law's provisions.facebook, twitter and youtube will be the law's main focus but it is also likely to be applied to reddit, tumblr and russian social network vk. other sites such as vimeo and flickr could also be caught up in its provisions. the netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz (ne






germany starts enforcing hate speech law


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption facebook is one of the social media companies affected by netzdg germany is set to start enforcing a law that demands social media sites move quickly to remove hate speech, fake news and illegal material.sites that do not remove "obviously illegal" posts could face fines of up to 50m euro (£44.3m).the law gives the networks 24 hours to act after they have been told about law-breaking material.social networks and media sites with more than two million members will fall under the law's provisions.facebook, twitter and youtube will be the law's main focus but it is also likely to be applied to reddit, tumblr and russian social network vk. other sites such as vimeo and flickr could also be caught up in its provisions. the netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz (ne






social media giants 'shamefully far' from tackling illegal content


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption mps said the government should consider making the sites pay to help police what people post social media firms are "shamefully far" from tackling illegal and dangerous content, says a parliamentary report. hate speech, terror recruitment videos and sexual images of children all took too long to be removed, said the home affairs select committee report.the government should consider making the sites pay to help police what people post, it said.but a former facebook executive told the bbc the report "bashes companies" but offers few real solutions. the cross-party committee took evidence from facebook, twitter and google, the parent company of youtube, for its report. it said they had made efforts to tackle abuse and extremism on their platforms, but






facebook launches initiative to fight online hate speech


image copyrightreutersimage caption facebook says it will support and train ngos to spot and respond to hate speech and extremism facebook is launching a uk initiative to train and fund local organisations to combat extremism and hate speech.it comes a week after the social network announced steps of its own to remove terrorist-related content from its site. the uk online civil courage initiative's initial partners include imams online and the jo cox foundation.facebook has faced criticism for being slow to react to terrorist propaganda on its platforms."the recent terror attacks in london and manchester - like violence anywhere - are absolutely heartbreaking," said facebook's chief operating officer, sheryl sandberg."no-one should have to live in fear of terrorism - and we all have a part






facebook grilled on britain first page by mps


image copyrightreutersimage caption yvette cooper read out a series of abusive threats made to mps on twitter facebook has said it is reviewing the future of britain first's profile page, following the removal of its leaders' pages from twitter.the social network said it was "very cautious" about removing political speech.the details emerged as the home affairs committee grilled facebook, google and twitter on what they were doing to combat hate speech.mps said the firms had made progress but were still not doing enough.google promised an annual transparency report on the issue. facebook and twitter said they were looking at a similar course of action but did not commit to it.on britain first, a far-right group, facebook's director of public policy simon milner said it was reviewing its fu






google to ramp up ai efforts to id extremism on youtube


last week facebook solicited help with what it dubbed “hard questions” — including how it should tackle the spread of terrorism propaganda on its platform.yesterday google followed suit with its own public pronouncement, via an op-ed in the ft newspaper, explaining how it’s ramping up measures to tackle extremist content.both companies have been coming under increasing political pressure in europe especially to do more to quash extremist content — with politicians including in the uk and germany pointing the finger of blame at platforms such as youtube for hosting hate speech and extremist content.europe has suffered a spate of terror attacks in recent years, with four in the uk alone since march. and governments in the uk and france are currently considering whether to introduce a new lia






google to ramp up ai efforts to id extremism on youtube


last week facebook solicited help with what it dubbed “hard questions” — including how it should tackle the spread of terrorism propaganda on its platform.yesterday google followed suit with its own public pronouncement, via an op-ed in the ft newspaper, explaining how it’s ramping up measures to tackle extremist content.both companies have been coming under increasing political pressure in europe especially to do more to quash extremist content — with politicians including in the uk and germany pointing the finger of blame at platforms such as youtube for hosting hate speech and extremist content.europe has suffered a spate of terror attacks in recent years, with four in the uk alone since march. and governments in the uk and france are currently considering whether to introduce a new lia






twitter claims tech wins in quashing terror tweets


in its latest transparency report, which covers requests it’s received from governments pertaining to content on its platform, twitter has reported a big decline in the proportion of pro-terrorism accounts being reported over the past six months, saying this is down 80 per cent since its last report, as well as reporting a drop in the number of accounts it removed for terrorism-related content during this period.twitter claims pro-terrorism account reports have shrunk by a fifth in the past six months.it also reports that the vast majority (95 per cent) of account suspensions pertaining to the promotion of terrorism resulted from use of its in-house tech tools, up from 74 per cent on the prior six-month report period — with government requests accounting for less than one per cent of pro-t






facebook says crackdown on hate speech cuts 66k posts a week


facebook said tuesday that it deleted about 66,000 posts a week in the last two months as the social media giant cracks down on what it deems to be hate speech.new york — facebook said tuesday that it deleted about 66,000 posts a week in the last two months as the social media giant cracks down on what it deems to be hate speech.the company said in a blog post that deleting posts can “feel like censorship,” but that it is working on explaining its process better and improving its enforcement of hate speech.facebook defines hate speech as attacks on people based on their race, sexual orientation and other “protected characteristics.” the menlo park, california, company said it mostly relies on its 2 billion users to report any hateful posts they see. workers then review the posts and decide






austrian court rules facebook must delete ‘hate postings’


facebook must remove postings deemed as hate speech, an austrian court has ruled, in a legal victory for campaigners who want to force social media companies to combat online “trolling”.the case – brought by austria’s green party over insults to its leader – has international ramifications as the court ruled the postings must be deleted across the platform and not just in austria, a point that had been left open in an initial ruling.the case comes as legislators around europe are considering ways of forcing facebook, google, twitter and others to rapidly remove hate speech or incitement to violence.germany’s cabinet approved a plan last month to fine social networks up to 50 million euros ($55 million) if they fail to remove such postings quickly and the european union is considering new e






europe keeps up the pressure on social media over illegal content takedowns


the european union’s executive body is continuing to pressure social media firms to get better at removing illegal content from their platforms before it has a chance to spread further online.currently there is a voluntary code of conduct on countering illegal online hate speech across the european union. but the commission has previously indicated it could seek to legislate if it feels companies aren’t doing enough.after attending a meeting on the topic today, andrus ansip, the european commissioner for digital single market, tweeted to say the main areas tech firms need to be addressing are that “takedown should be fast, reliable, effective; pro-activity to detect, remove and disable content using automatic detection and filtering; adequate safeguards and counter notice”.while the notion






twitter shares surge after reporting first profitable quarter


san francisco — twitter on thursday reported a growth in ad sales and its first profitable quarter, but the tech firm’s monthly active users remained flat compared to the previous quarter.“i’m proud of the steady progress we made in 2017, and confident in our path ahead,” said twitter ceo and co-founder jack dorsey in a statement.twitter’s stock at one point rose more than 23 percent in pre-market trading to $33.28 per share after the company released its financial results.get tech news in your inbox weekday mornings. sign up for the free good morning silicon valley newsletter.the san francisco company, which has struggled to compete for ad dollars, has also faced a string of executive departures. twitter coo anthony noto recently left to become the chief executive of sofi.some analysts an






facebook hits two billion user mark | news


the social media network giant facebook says its ranks of monthly active users have hit the two billion mark -or more than a quarter of the world's population."as of this morning, the facebook community is now officially 2 billion people!" co-founder and chief executive mark zuckerberg wrote in a post on his facebook page marking the milestone."we're making progress connecting the world, and now let's bring the world closer together," he wrote. "it's an honor to be on this journey with you."naomi gleit, a vice president at the internet giant, credited millions of small communities at facebook for helping drive growth. read more: facebook reveals ai use to block 'terrorist content' more than a billion people take part in "groups" at facebook each month and more than 800 million people "like






facebook must delete hate postings, austria court rules


image copyrightepaimage caption facebook has been under pressure to act more against online trolling a court in austria has ordered that facebook must remove postings seen as hate speech, in a ruling that is set to have international implications.the case was brought by the country's green party after its leader was targeted by a false account.the court said postings not just in austria but worldwide must be deleted. facebook has not yet commented.the ruling is seen as a victory for campaigners who want to make social media platforms combat online trolling.the appeals court in vienna ruled that postings against greens' leader eva glawischnig as any verbatim repostings should be removed.it added that merely blocking the messages in austria without removing them for users abroad was not suff






facebook must delete hate postings, austria court rules


image copyrightepaimage caption facebook has been under pressure to act more against online trolling a court in austria has ordered that facebook must remove postings seen as hate speech, in a ruling that is set to have international implications.the case was brought by the country's green party after its leader was targeted by a false account.the court said postings not just in austria but worldwide must be deleted. facebook has not yet commented.the ruling is seen as a victory for campaigners who want to make social media platforms combat online trolling.the appeals court in vienna ruled that postings against greens' leader eva glawischnig as any verbatim repostings should be removed.it added that merely blocking the messages in austria without removing them for users abroad was not suff






facebook now deleting 66k posts a week in anti-hate campaign


new york — facebook is deleting about 66,000 posts a week as the social media giant cracks down on what it considers to be hate speech.the company says in a blog post tuesday that deleting posts can "feel like censorship," but that it is working on explaining its process better.facebook says it defines hate speech as attacks on people based on their race, sexual orientation and other "protected characteristics." the menlo park, california, company says it mostly relies on its nearly two billion users to report any hateful posts they see. workers then review the posts and decide whether to delete it.facebook inc. says it has 4,500 workers reviewing posts and plans to hire 3,000 more in the next year.the deleted posts went up over the last two months.






social media giants 'shamefully far' from tackling illegal content


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption mps said the government should consider making the sites pay to help police what people post social media firms are "shamefully far" from tackling illegal and dangerous content, says a parliamentary report. hate speech, terror recruitment videos and sexual images of children all took too long to be removed, said the home affairs select committee report.the government should consider making the sites help pay to police content, it said.but a former facebook executive told the bbc the report "bashes companies" but offers few real solutions. the cross-party committee took evidence from facebook, twitter and google, the parent company of youtube, for its report. it said they had made efforts to tackle abuse and extremism on their platforms, but "nowhere






social media giants 'shamefully far' from tackling illegal content


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption mps said the government should consider making the sites pay to help police what people post social media firms are "shamefully far" from tackling illegal and dangerous content, says a parliamentary report. hate speech, terror recruitment videos and sexual images of children all took too long to be removed, said the home affairs select committee report.the government should consider making the sites help pay to police content, it said.but a former facebook executive told the bbc the report "bashes companies" but offers few real solutions. the cross-party committee took evidence from facebook, twitter and google, the parent company of youtube, for its report. it said they had made efforts to tackle abuse and extremism on their platforms, but "nowhere






social media giants 'shamefully far' from tackling illegal content


image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption mps said the government should consider making the sites pay to help police what people post social media firms are "shamefully far" from tackling illegal and dangerous content, says a parliamentary report. hate speech, terror recruitment videos and sexual images of children all took too long to be removed, said the home affairs select committee report.the government should consider making the sites help pay to police content, it said.but a former facebook executive told the bbc the report "bashes companies" but offers few real solutions. the cross-party committee took evidence from facebook, twitter and google, the parent company of youtube, for its report. it said they had made efforts to tackle abuse and extremism on their platforms, but "nowhere






tech giants pressured to auto-flag “illegal” content in europe


social media giants have again been put on notice that they need to do more to speed up removals of hate speech and other illegal content from their platforms in the european union.the bloc’s executive body, the european commission today announced a set of “guidelines and principles” aimed at pushing tech platforms to be more pro-active about takedowns of content deemed a problem. specifically it’s urging they build tools to automate flagging and re-uploading of such content.“the increasing availability and spreading of terrorist material and content that incites violence and hatred online is a serious threat to the security and safety of eu citizens,” it said in a press release, arguing that illegal content also “undermines citizens’ trust and confidence in the digital environment” and ca