Candlelites

Everything from Everywhere

StarTribune Local

Latest headline news from StarTribune Local with momentary update to provide the online news, world news, sports news, family news, health news, video news, national news, food news and politics news from StarTribune Local.



hennepin county library scraps plan to renovate every 12 years

as the hennepin county library system nears the 10-year anniversary of its merger with minneapolis city libraries, officials are looking at a new way of deciding when to revamp the system’s buildings.the 2008 merger boosted the number of libraries in the hennepin system from 26 to 41, making it the state’s largest. since then, the county has had the goal of updating each of its libraries every 12 years.that’s led to the unveiling of new library buildings, such as those in brooklyn park and webber park in minneapolis, and renovations of buildings such as the ridgedale library in minnetonka, where construction starts this month.but library leaders told the county board last month that it may be time to change that policy.renovating libraries based on the building’s use, instead of an automatic revamp every 12 years, could be more efficient and possibly less expensive over time, they said. it might also ensure that patrons get the same experience no matter which library they visit, from downtown minneapolis to the outer-ring suburbs.“we just had to get ourselves on a schedule; it was a good first step,” said lois langer thompson, the library system’s director. “but is that the best way? it took us that long to understand how the buildings are used.” glen stubbe - star tribune the new library in brooklyn park has a viking ship-themed bike rack outside. in june, the county board directed library officials to come up with criteria for a new plan o...





forest lake adds pickleball courts as sport's popularity grows

don’t let the beaming smiles, the friendly banter and the gentle camaraderie of its contestants fool you. pickleball is not for the fainthearted.“frank has left some of his dna on the court,” denny johnson said of the many skinned knees and bruises earned by his 82-year-old friend and pickleball partner frank slater.said slater: “you’ve gotta be tough.”the dramatic growth of the game — which looks like tennis but is played on a badminton-sized court with what look like giant ping-pong paddles — prompted forest lake recently to open a new set of pickleball courts at its fenway park athletics complex. since unofficially opening two weeks ago, not a day has gone by when dozens of people weren’t knocking the ball back and forth, said jamie muscha, the city’s park and recreation coordinator.“the game is for everybody. schools are starting to teach it,” muscha said. “but it’s very popular among the senior population. and we are really striving to have something for everybody.”according to the usa pickleball association, the game was invented in 1965 on bainbridge island, wash., “by three dads whose kids were bored with their usual summertime activities.” it has since gained players in europe and asia, and according to the sports & fitness industry association, almost 2.5 million people play pickleball in the united states. elizabeth flores - star tribune jim larson whacked away on forest lake’s new pickleball courts last week. ov...





burnsville apartment project spells legal trouble

burnsville officials had expected to break ground this summer on a high-end apartment project — complete with a gym, yoga studio and pool — one of just two multifamily buildings the city council has approved since 2004.instead, the city and developer have tabled the project as they brace for a court fight with the owners of a nearby strip mall, nicollet plaza. christopher penwell, a lawyer for the mall, told the city council that the project has too many units and inadequate parking, violating several agreements and altering the original site plans.“they’re trying to pack too much on this particular site, and it doesn’t work,” penwell said.the city council unanimously approved changes to the project plans and a related zoning ordinance in april. nicollet plaza filed a lawsuit in dakota county in early may against the city, developer chase real estate and landowner ksh development seeking to halt the project.penwell contends that all parties must approve of any changes to the project because they entered into a legally binding agreement in 2004 when they signed off on earlier project plans — and his client won’t go along with the revisions.mayor elizabeth kautz said the previous site plans were meant to be flexible and noted that the city has revised such plans for other projects. provided images parking concerns around the development are the driving force behind objections to the project. “what we’re looking at is you holding the city hos...





minneapolis gathering highlights growing global role of lutheran women

more than 3,000 lutheran women from across the globe — from nebraska to namibia — descended on the minneapolis convention center this week to share ideas on projects helping women and children and to build camaraderie among the faithful.while the evangelical church in america (elca) was a pioneer in women’s advancement — ordaining women in 1970 and providing key leadership roles over the years — the rank and file also has been carving its own path in lutheran service. that was clear at the triennial gathering of the women of the elca running through sunday. mary jo mettler, for example, is a pine city woman who led a project bringing minnesota solar panels to a poor liberian hospital. sara larson from outside marshall was among those who coordinate shipments to lutheran world relief of items ranging from school supplies to new baby care packages.“i’ve spent countless hours in the back of trucks, loading quilts, personal care kits and school kits for lutheran world relief,” said larson. “it’s all these women, running to the store to buy this stuff, that makes this and other things happen.”a walk through the exhibit halls showed this was a different type of conference. one area had a dozen sewing machine stations, where women stopped during breaks to stitch sections of quilts for global disaster victims.another area held drop-off donation tables topped with things from socks to sweaters to toiletries. other tables were staffed by nonprofits offering inform...





carl kroening, staunch supporter of minneapolis schools and parks, dies at 89

even before carl kroening’s booming voice became a fixture at the minnesota legislature, it was known in the classrooms and hallways of several minneapolis public schools where he taught chemistry and served as assistant principal.kroening used his powerful voice to make a difference, especially for those living on the city’s north side.“he really was an advocate for parks and a defender of the river and the north side,” said brian rice, attorney for the minneapolis park and recreation board. his father served in the legislature with kroening.the longtime educator and legislator died june 29 at the university of minnesota medical center following a stroke, said his daughter, kathryn kroening-smith of champlin. he was 89.kroening was born in minneapolis, the oldest of five boys. his father worked on the railroad and moved the family to princeton, minn., after he got laid off during the depression.carl and his brothers walked 3½ miles to town to attend a one-room schoolhouse. “he always said later that some of the best teaching comes from other students explaining it to another student,” kroening-smith said. kyndell harkness - star tribune file the carl kroening building at north mississippi park. in minneapolis. when he became a teacher, he used that approach to get his students to work together and learn.he graduated from john marshall high school and earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry and educational administration from ...





mpls. curbside composting yields less waste than expected

minneapolis residents eagerly participated in the first year of the city’s new organics recycling program — the largest of its kind in the metro — but so far they’re tossing less than anticipated in the green curbside bins.more than 45,000 households have signed up for the program since it expanded to the entire city last july, or 43 percent of the eligible single-family homes and small apartment buildings. the city had expected 40 percent of eligible households to participate.those residents sent nearly 4,000 tons of organic matter to be converted to compost at a rosemount facility, rather than incinerated with other trash. but that’s about half what the city expected when it launched the program a year ago, based on a consultant’s projections.the city’s director of solid waste, david herberholz, said people are generally tossing items most associated with composting — like fruit and vegetable scraps. they haven’t yet grown accustomed to recycling other materials the program accepts, like bones, meat, cheese, pizza boxes and soiled paper, he said.“people are very conscious of getting the program right,” herberholz said. “so they’re kind of tiptoeing and concentrating on the food waste, initially.”state waste officials hope organics collection services eventually become commonplace across the twin cities.a handful of other cities and individual haulers offer curbside pickup, and organics drop-off sites are growing more prevalent.in st. louis park, ...





red lake man charged in shooting death of juvenile in fight over playstation

a man from red lake, minn., has been charged with murder in the shooting death of a boy in a fight over a stolen playstation, authorities said friday.joshua francis hill, 20, was charged in the june 25 death, which occurred on the red lake indian reservation. he made his first court appearance on tuesday in bemidji.officers responded to a call at a residence on the reservation, according to the u.s. attorney’s office. there they found the body of a boy with a gunshot wound.hill had been fighting with the victim over a stolen playstation 3, according to authorities.after hill shot and killed the victim with a rifle, he asked two people to get rid of the rifle, but police were able to find it, authorities said.red lake tribal police and the fbi headwaters safe trails task force took part in the investigation.beatrice dupuy





arden hills neighbors raise stink over garbage idea for park

a state mandate to get serious about recycling has more people in ramsey county delivering their greasy pizza boxes and chicken bones to organic drop-off sites, with the number doubling in the past couple years to more than 50,000 visits.now it's leading to a push to get the one hold-out in the county — arden hills — to finally climb onboard.problem is, the arden hills organic drop-off is in a regional park. and that has neighbors, many of whom were outraged the last time the county tried this, coming forward again to howl their disapproval."i don't buy there's not going to be odors from this stuff," said loren lemke, a resident for more than 60 years. "when i went out today to put out the garbage and lifted the lid, holy smokes that stunk! … when it gets hot, it stinks like heck."arden hills planning commission members voted unanimously this week to recommend the use of parkland for dropping off food scraps. now the issue goes to the city council, which may decide what to do later this month.planning commission chairwoman roberta thompson stressed that she is herself passionate about encouraging re-use of waste items."i have my own compost bin and no issues with critters or smells," she said. "i don't even have a garbage disposal, that's how dedicated i am."resident fears include not only stinky bins but random drop-offs at closed gates that might attract wildlife, already an annoyance to many in the area.the use of parkland for drop-off also bothers many ...





minneapolis gathering highlights growing global role of lutheran women

more than 3,000 lutheran women from across the globe — from nebraska to namibia — descended on the minneapolis convention center this week to share ideas on projects helping women and children and to build camaraderie among the faithful.while the evangelical church in america (elca) was a pioneer in women's advancement — ordaining women in 1970 and providing key leadership roles over the years — the rank and file also has been carving its own path in lutheran service. that was clear at the triennial gathering of the women of the elca running through sunday. mary jo mettler, for example, is a pine city woman who led a project bringing minnesota solar panels to a poor liberian hospital. sara larson from outside marshall was among those who coordinate shipments to lutheran world relief of items ranging from school supplies to new baby care packages."i've spent countless hours in the back of trucks, loading quilts, personal care kits and school kits for lutheran world relief," said larson. "it's all these women, running to the store to buy this stuff, that makes this and other things happen."a walk through the exhibit halls showed this was a different type of conference. one area had a dozen sewing machine stations, where women stopped during breaks to stitch sections of quilts for global disaster victims.another area held drop-off donation tables topped with things from socks to sweaters to toiletries. other tables were staffed by nonprofits offering information a...





bookmark this: minneapolis library's summer club gets kids reading

despite their different levels of reading comprehension, the roughly dozen fourth- through 12th-graders sat glued friday to the pages of a book about malala yousafzai while taking turns reading aloud.one fourth-grade girl, whose mustard-colored hijab matched the one that malala was wearing on the cover of “who is malala yousafzai?” read quotes from the pakistani activist’s nobel peace prize acceptance speech in measured syllables.other students quickly read through the final pages, looking back at the life of the teen who was shot in 2012 by a taliban gunman for her promotion of girls’ education.tiffany casey, the 30-year-old librarian who has led the weekly summer book club at sumner library in the near north neighborhood of minneapolis for the past few years, said the club was designed to be flexible because most of the kids already hang out at the library and elect to come to meetings when they want.“doing this is just really helpful for them, because they know it’s every friday at 4,” casey said. “it’s just super easy for them because they’re already here, but no one’s coordinating their time.”casey, who inherited the club from another librarian, said the kids ask for the program all year long. she said the library’s goal is to keep kids engaged with books through the summer, when they’re not in school.casey plans out the summer reading list each year, choosing books that reflect the diversity of the kids who come to the club.“kamila and her ...





anoka county seeks disaster aid for $600k+ in uninsured storm damage

anoka county is seeking state financial aid for damage dealt by a powerful june hailstorm that pummeled the north metro and left at least one city clearing away heaps of ice with a snowplow.the county board unanimously adopted a resolution tuesday declaring a state of emergency, a step required to apply for state aid to repair damage done to public property and infrastructure.early estimates from the june 11 storm place uninsured loss about $650,000, with much of the cost incurred at the state-owned national sports center campus in blaine, according to terry stoltzman, the county’s emergency management director.each county has a different threshold to qualify for the state’s disaster assistance funds. anoka county’s threshold is just over $595,000.“we’re looking at uninsured loss,” stoltzman said at the july 11 meeting. “this is only for government property.”the aid does not apply to damage to private property or individual homes, he said. a coon rapids snow plow clears away hail from a june storm that battered the metro and left behind more than $600,000 in damage to anoka county public property and infrastructure. after officials complete a preliminary damage assessment, the governor decides whether to declare a state disaster, which makes aid available to reimburse counties for part of the cleanup and repair costs.if a county gets the green light for assistance, all of the government jurisdictions in its boundaries may apply for aid. the money can h...





long-lost soldier returns to minnesota and to love of his life

army staff sgt. gerald “jerry” jacobsen is finally home in minnesota, 73 years after he went missing during a world war ii battle in france.and the woman who waited for him, with those decades now etched into her face, found solace friday. she cradled the folded american flag in her lap, gazing straight ahead at the coffin that contained her husband’s remains, long buried in a french cemetery under a cross that bore no name. the love of her life will now rest in section 31 on the southern edge of fort snelling national cemetery.“this is such a lift to my heart,” said jacobsen’s 94-year-old widow, catherine tauer. “it’s wonderful to have him home.”on friday, jacobsen received the military funeral honors he long deserved and that tauer needed.a six-man honor guard, its unison steps measured and precise, carried the flag-covered coffin from the hearse to the assembly shelter, where tauer, family, friends and a few strangers looked on, absorbing the solemn ceremony. grabbing the flag’s edges, the honor guard popped the flag from the casket, holding it taut during the crack of a three-volley salute and the mournful sound of a bugler playing taps.tauer held her gaze strong. others in the crowd dabbed their eyes. elizabeth flores, star tribune more than 70 years after army staff sgt. jerry jacobsen went missing during a world war ii battle in france, his remains were finally recovered and laid to rest at fort snelling national cemetery on friday befo...





minneapolis gathering highlights growing global role of lutheran women

more than 3,000 lutheran women from across the globe — from nebraska to namibia — descended on the minneapolis convention center this week to share ideas on projects helping women and children and to build camaraderie among the faithful.while the evangelical church of america (elca) was a pioneer in women’s advancement — ordaining women in 1970 and providing key leadership roles over the years — the rank and file also has been carving its own path in lutheran service. that was clear at the triennial gathering of the women of the elca running through sunday. mary jo mettler, for example, is a pine city woman who led a project bringing minnesota solar panels to a poor liberian hospital. sara larson from outside marshall was among those who coordinate shipments to lutheran world relief of items ranging from school supplies to new baby care packages.“i’ve spent countless hours in the back of trucks, loading quilts, personal care kits and school kits for lutheran world relief,” said larson, a board member of the group. “it’s all these women, running to the store to buy this stuff, that makes this and other things happen.”a walk through the exhibit halls showed this was a different type of conference. one area had a dozen sewing machine stations, where women stopped during breaks to stitch sections of quilts for global disaster victims.another area held drop-off donation tables topped with things from socks to sweaters to toiletries. other tables were staffed ...





mpls. curbside composting yields less waste than expected

minneapolis residents eagerly participated in the first year of the city's new organics recycling program — the largest of its kind in the metro — but so far they're tossing less than anticipated in the green curbside bins.more than 45,000 households have signed up for the program since it expanded to the entire city last july, or 43 percent of the eligible single-family homes and small apartment buildings. the city had expected 40 percent of eligible households to participate.those residents sent nearly 4,000 tons of organic matter to be converted to compost at a rosemount facility, rather than incinerated with other trash. but that's about half what the city expected when it launched the program a year ago, based on a consultant's projections.the city's director of solid waste, david herberholz, said people are generally tossing items most associated with composting — like fruit and vegetable scraps. they haven't yet grown accustomed to recycling other materials the program accepts, like bones, meat, cheese, pizza boxes and soiled paper, he said."people are very conscious of getting the program right," herberholz said. "so they're kind of tiptoeing and concentrating on the food waste, initially."state waste officials hope organics collection services eventually become commonplace across the twin cities.a handful of other cities and individual haulers offer curbside pickup, and organics drop-off sites are growing more prevalent.in st. louis park, which has h...





bookmark this: minneapolis library's summer club gets kids reading

despite their different levels of reading comprehension, the roughly dozen fourth- through 12th-graders sat glued friday to the pages of a book about malala yousafzai while taking turns reading aloud.one fourth-grade girl, whose mustard-colored hijab matched the one that malala was wearing on the cover of “who is malala yousafzai?” read quotes from the pakistani activist’s nobel peace prize acceptance speech in measured syllables.other students quickly read through the final pages, looking back at the life of the teen who was shot in 2012 by a taliban gunman for her promotion of girls’ education.tiffany casey, the 30-year-old librarian who has led the weekly summer book club at sumner library in the near north neighborhood of minneapolis for the past few years, said the club was designed to be flexible because most of the kids already hang out at the library and elect to come to meetings when they want.“doing this is just really helpful for them, because they know it’s every friday at 4,” casey said. “it’s just super easy for them because they’re already here, but no one’s coordinating their time.”casey, who inherited the club from another librarian, said the kids ask for the program all year long. she said the library’s goal is to keep kids engaged with books through the summer, when they’re not in school.casey plans out the summer reading list each year, choosing books that reflect the diversity of the kids who come to the club.“kamila and her ...





anoka county seeks disaster aid for $600k+ in uninsured storm damage

anoka county is seeking state financial aid for damage dealt by a powerful june hailstorm that pummeled the north metro and left at least one city clearing away heaps of ice with a snowplow.the county board unanimously adopted a resolution tuesday declaring a state of emergency, a step required to apply for state aid to repair damage done to public property and infrastructure.early estimates from the june 11 storm place uninsured loss about $650,000, with much of the cost incurred at the state-owned national sports center campus in blaine, according to terry stoltzman, the county's emergency management director.each county has a different threshold to qualify for the state's disaster assistance funds. anoka county's threshold is just over $595,000."we're looking at uninsured loss," stoltzman said at the july 11 meeting. "this is only for government property."the aid does not apply to damage to private property or individual homes, he said. a coon rapids snow plow clears away hail from a june storm that battered the metro and left behind more than $600,000 in damage to anoka county public property and infrastructure. after officials complete a preliminary damage assessment, the governor decides whether to declare a state disaster, which makes aid available to reimburse counties for part of the cleanup and repair costs.if a county gets the green light for assistance, all of the government jurisdictions in its boundaries may apply for aid. the money can help pay ...





3 minn. men killed in crash involving wrong-way driver on wis. freeway

a driver heading the wrong way on interstate 94 in western wisconsin collided head-on with another vehicle in dunn county late thursday afternoon, setting that car on fire and killing its three occupants, the wisconsin state patrol said.killed were driver adam g. kendhammer, 32, and his passengers, jeremy a. berchem, 27, and bryan e. rudell, 29, all from minneapolis. the wrong-way driver, serghei kundilovski, 36, from california, suffered life-threatening injuries.several motorists called police to report that a black car had crossed the median and was headed west in the eastbound lanes at high speed moments before the fiery crash at 5:44 p.m. between baldwin and menomonie, the patrol said.the black car, a mitsubishi driven by kundilovski, struck an eastbound gray 2015 kia carrying the three minnesotans, the patrol said. all three victims died at the scene. kundilovski was airlifted to a hospital with critical injuries, the patrol said.the crash is being investigated by the wisconsin state patrol and the dunn county sheriff's office.tim harlow





arden hills neighbors raise stink over garbage idea for park

a state mandate to get serious about recycling has more people in ramsey county delivering their greasy pizza boxes and chicken bones to organic drop-off sites, with the number doubling in the past couple years to more than 50,000 visits.now it’s leading to a push to get the one hold-out in the county — arden hills — to finally climb onboard.problem is, the arden hills organic drop-off is in a regional park. and that has neighbors, many of whom were outraged the last time the county tried this, coming forward again to howl their disapproval.“i don’t buy there’s not going to be odors from this stuff,” said loren lemke, a resident for more than 60 years. “when i went out today to put out the garbage and lifted the lid, holy smokes that stunk! … when it gets hot, it stinks like heck.”arden hills planning commission members voted unanimously this week to recommend the use of parkland for dropping off food scraps. now the issue goes to the city council, which may decide what to do later this month.planning commission chairwoman roberta thompson stressed that she is herself passionate about encouraging re-use of waste items.“i have my own compost bin and no issues with critters or smells,” she said. “i don’t even have a garbage disposal, that’s how dedicated i am.”resident fears include not only stinky bins but random drop-offs at closed gates that might attract wildlife, already an annoyance to many in the area.the use of parkland for drop-off also ...





minneapolis gathering highlights growing global role of lutheran women

more than 3,000 lutheran women from across the globe — from nebraska to namibia — descended on the minneapolis convention center this week to share ideas on projects helping women and children and to build camaraderie among the faithful.while the evangelical church of america (elca) was a pioneer in women's advancement — ordaining women in 1970 and providing key leadership roles over the years — the rank and file also has been carving its own path in lutheran service. that was clear at the triennial gathering of the women of the elca running through sunday. mary jo mettler, for example, is a pine city woman who led a project bringing minnesota solar panels to a poor liberian hospital. sara larson from outside marshall was among those who coordinate shipments to lutheran world relief of items ranging from school supplies to new baby care packages."i've spent countless hours in the back of trucks, loading quilts, personal care kits and school kits for lutheran world relief," said larson, a board member of the group. "it's all these women, running to the store to buy this stuff, that makes this and other things happen."a walk through the exhibit halls showed this was a different type of conference. one area had a dozen sewing machine stations, where women stopped during breaks to stitch sections of quilts for global disaster victims.another area held drop-off donation tables topped with things from socks to sweaters to toiletries. other tables were staffed by nonp...





red lake man charged in shooting death of juvenile after fight over playstation

a man from red lake, minn., has been charged with murder in the shooting death of a boy in a fight over a stolen playstation, authorities said friday.joshua francis hill, 20, was charged in the june 25 death, which occurred on the red lake indian reservation.hill made his first court appearance on tuesday in bemidji.officers responded to a call at a residence on the reservation, according to the u.s. attorney’s office. there they found the body of a boy with a gunshot wound.hill had been fighting with the victim over a stolen playstation 3, according to authorities.after hill shot and killed the victim with a rifle, he asked two people to get rid of the rifle, but police were able to find it, authorities said.red lake tribal police and the fbi headwaters safe trails task force took part in the investigation.