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in 1960s, black chicagoans sought relief from discrimination. in south side co-op, they found a sanctuary.

in 1960s, black chicagoans sought relief from discrimination. in south side co-op, they found a sanctuary. News Article With The full text news. The Resource Link is down the post and you can View this News Article in the source page.



in 1960s, black chicagoans sought relief from discrimination. in south side co-op, they found a sanctuary.

john griffin knew he wasn’t safe. not in south holland. not in 1967.as the then-20-year-old, who is black, navigated his car though the southwest suburb, folks stared. they were wary, he said, wondering what on earth he was doing in the majority-white neighborhood.here’s what: he was looking for a home.“i drove around south holland and i decided that i wasn’t going to put my family through that,” griffin, now 72, said. “the hostility was there. you knew that you were going to have a problem.”his instinct wasn’t wrong. one of his co-workers, also black, did go on to buy a house there.“they burnt his house down,” griffin said.it’s no secret that chicago, one of the most segregated cities in the nation, has an ugly history of housing discrimination. before the federal fair housing act passed in april 1968 — 50 years ago — people of color were frequently, and flagrantly, prohibited from renting, buying or financing homes in areas where the population was mostly white.right before the act’s passage, some black chicagoans found homes, and refuge, in a housing cooperative on the city’s south side. griffin moved into london towne houses cooperative, in the pullman community area, in 1967.joann kenner, 73, current president of london towne houses, also has lived in the community since ’67. in the years before fair housing laws, the mentality around integrated communities, kenner said, was as in the play “a raisin in the sun” — “even if you were ...