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the indian film where the word 'cow' is banned

india’s film watchdog says that the word "cow” must be removed from a documentary about nobel prize-winning economist amartya sen.what do people think about this decision?





goat yoga: the classes that take place in a pen

videogoats have been introduced to yoga sessions in suffolk with organisers claiming the animals help produce "feel-good hormones".share this withcopy this linkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-suffolk-40602439/goat-yoga-the-classes-that-take-place-in-a-penread more about sharingclose share panel





week in pictures: 8 - 14 july 2017

our selection of some of the most striking news photographs taken around the world this week.image copyrightkim kyung-hoon/ reuters image caption at tokyo's yasukuni shrine, women in casual summer kimonos, known as yukatas, take a selfie. the shrine commemorates the 2.4 million war dead of japan. image copyrightsusana vera/ reuters image caption a cow leaps over a pile of revellers on its way into the bullring at the san fermin festival in pamplona, northern spain. image copyrightfabrizio bensch/ reutersimage caption german politicians want europe to set up a database to keep track of leftist militants, following clashes that left nearly 500 police officers injured during the g20 summit in hamburg. image copyrightamos gumulira / afpimage caption madonna took her four adopted malawian children to the opening of a paediatric hospital wing that her charity has built in their home country. image copyrightjosh edelson/ afpimage caption three firefighters rescue the stars and stripes from a luxury home in oroville, california, where wildfires are still uncontained, forcing thousands of people to be evacuated. a combination of high temperatures and parched land has added to the difficulties of firefighters. image copyrightdarren staples / reutersimage caption to mark the 60th anniversary of the battle of britain memorial flight, prince william met pilots who flew for the raf during world war two. the memorial flight was formed to honour t...





vogue sorry for gigi hadid and zayn malik 'gender fluid' claim

image copyrightinez and vinoodh/vogueimage caption zayn malik and gigi hadid in the us vogue photoshoot us vogue has apologised for "missing the mark" by saying zayn malik and his girlfriend gigi hadid were "embracing gender fluidity".in an interview, the former one directioner and the us model talked about borrowing each other's clothes.they were photographed in colourful, fairly androgynous clothes.but readers mocked the magazine for its definition of the phrase, pointing out that what you wear does not make you "gender fluid". many on social media pointed out that the term refers to people with a particular transgender identity, who do not conform to societal expectations of male or female or identify as either.for instance jacob tobia wrote in cosmopolitan: "if you're going to talk about a marginalised community, talk to that community."unlike how this new vogue cover shoot presents it, the lived experience of being gender-nonconforming is rarely that fun and glamorous."'it's about shapes'vogue describes a conversation between the pair, with hadid telling malik: "i shop in your closet all the time, don't i?". the 24-year-old singer then replies that he borrowed an anna sui t-shirt from her, adding: "i like that shirt. and if it's tight on me, so what? it doesn't matter if it was made for a girl." hadid, 22, agrees, saying: "totally. it's not about gender. it's about, like, shapes. and what feels good on you that day. "and anyway, it's fun...





joy and tears for families reunited in mosul

videotwo weeks ago the bbc reported the rescue of 20 children used as human shields by the islamic state group. since then, some have been reunited with their families but not all of them recognise their relatives, as nafiseh kohnavard found.share this withcopy this linkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-middle-east-40609255/joy-and-tears-for-families-reunited-in-mosulread more about sharingclose share panel





newspaper headlines: acid attacks and charlie gard dominate

image caption the times reports that new laws to restrict the sale and possession of corrosive substances will be proposed by ministers after five people had acid thrown in their faces on thursday night. image caption the daily mirror says an american specialist will fly to the uk next week to try an untested treatment on charlie gard. image caption the case of charlie gard also features on the front of the weekend i, which says a us doctor argues his experimental therapy is "worth trying". image caption the guardian says a new report highlights the hardships of renters and the young. image caption the daily mail warns holidaymakers face rises in insurance excess charges for car hire. image caption the sun says that chancellor philip hammond has sparked a "sexism storm" by saying that driving trains is now so easy "even" a woman can do it. image caption the ft weekend says two of the us's biggest banks, jp morgan and citi, reported that revenues from their trading business dropped sharply in the second quarter of the year. the front page of the times reports that new laws to restrict the sale and possession of corrosive substances will be proposed "within days", because of the rise in acid attacks.the plans are predicted to feature tougher sentencing guidelines and a ban on the sale of the chemicals to under-18s.they will be released in the next 48 hours, the newspaper says.image copyrightsarah cobbold/reutersim...





one of these places will be the uk city of culture in 2021

image copyrightgetty images/council handoutsimage caption clockwise from top left: sunderland, paisley, swansea, coventry, stoke coventry, paisley, sunderland, swansea and stoke-on-trent will compete to host a year-long celebration of art and performance as uk city of culture 2021.the five locations are on a shortlist for the title, but six other bidding towns and cities missed out.the five left in the race will hope to emulate the success of hull, which is uk city of culture this year.the title is awarded every four years and the winner for 2021 will be the third uk city of culture.coventryimage copyrightcoventry city of culture trustit's the birthplace of philip larkin, one of england's finest poets, and the home of the 2 tone ska movement through bands like the specials and the selecter.venues would include warwick arts centre, the belgrade theatre and the herbert art gallery and museum. it's not just about the existing culture - it is, as the bid organisers say, "about changing the reputation of a city".paisleyimage copyrightrenfrewshire councilthis renfrewshire town, population 76,000, is perhaps most famous for the paisley print - the intricate, colourful designs that were inspired by kashmiri patterns in the 18th century and popularised in the psychedelic 1960s.it was also home to gerry rafferty, known for his hit baker street. former doctor who star david tennant grew up in the city, while paolo nutini's dad runs a fish and chip cafe there. there are pla...





raul castro denounces donald trump's cuba policy

image copyrightafp/ getty imagesimage caption mr castro said he rejected mr trump's "manipulation of the topic of human rights" the president of cuba has spoken publicly for the first time against us president donald trump's rollback of a thaw between the two countries a month ago.president raul castro said "attempts to destroy the revolution" would fail.mr trump has tightened restrictions on us travel to and business with the communist island.but the us embassy in havana, re-opened by former president barack obama, is still operating.mr castro was speaking in front of cuba's national assembly. it was his first public comment on the policy changes mr trump announced a month ago.state-run cuban media quoted mr castro as saying that mr trump was using "old and hostile rhetoric" and had returned to "confrontation that roundly failed over 55 years".he said: "we reject the manipulation of the topic of human rights against cuba, which can be proud of much in this area and does not need to receive lessons from the united states nor anyone."mr trump anchored his policy rollback in human rights concerns raised by political opponents of cuba's communist government, many of whom have fled to miami where mr trump announced the changes on 16 june.mr castro continued: "cuba and the united states can cooperate and live side by side, respecting their differences. but no one should expect that for this, one should have to make concessions inherent to one's sovereignty ...





sentencing appeal rules to cover more terror offences

image copyrightepaimage caption there were calls for more sentences to be reviewed came after anjem choudary was convicted the public will be able to challenge a wider range of sentences given for terror offences under new plans.currently, people in england and wales can challenge punishments given for the most serious terror offences under the unduly lenient sentence scheme.but under the changes - which come into effect on 8 august - sentences for 19 other crimes will be open to challenge.calls for the extension came after hate preacher anjem choudary was sentenced to five-and-a-half years in prison.his crime - inviting support for so-called islamic state - was not previously covered by the scheme.the uls scheme allows anyone to appeal against crown court sentences if they think are too lightcrimes covered include murder, rape, robbery, and serious drug crimesthe concept was introduced by the 1988 criminal justice actthe attorney general's office can refer cases to the court of appeal, where they are reviewedin 2015, 136 cases were referred to the court of appeal, which led to an increasing of sentences for 102 offendersnew crimes that can be reviewed under the uls scheme include supporting proscribed organisations, encouraging terrorism, sharing terrorist propaganda, or not disclosing information about a terrorist attack. the new scheme will not be applied retrospectively. media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia caption'terrorists will feel full force of...





young families 'hit by income slowdown'

image copyrightgetty imagesyoung families were particularly hard hit by an "abrupt" slowdown in living standards in the year before the general election, a think tank says.the resolution foundation found that average income growth halved to 0.7% during that period compared with the previous year.those aged 25-34 were worst hit, it said, with their average incomes no higher than they were in 2002-03.pensioner incomes grew by 30% over that 15-year period, the think tank said.the foundation, which analyses living standards, said young families were the only group whose incomes have failed to return to pre-financial crisis levels."the typical 25 to 34-year-old appears no better off today than in 2002-03," the report said."in comparison, typical incomes for all other age groups are now above, or very near, their pre-recession peaks."the fall in average income growth followed a "mini-boom" between 2013 and 2015, the foundation said, when living standards improved.families in rented accommodation have experienced little or no income growth, while home-owners had a 1.7% growth, the report found.the think tank's senior economic analyst, adam corlett, said: "for millions of young and lower-income families the slowdown over the last year has come off the back of a tough decade for living standards, providing a bleak economic backdrop to the shock election result."over the last 15 years and four prime ministers, britain has failed to deliver decent living standards growth for ...





world's large carnivores being pushed off the map

image copyrightethiopian wolfimage caption the ethiopian wolf has lost 99% of its range six of the world's large carnivores have lost more than 90% of their historic range, according to a study.the ethiopian wolf, red wolf, tiger, lion, african wild dog and cheetah have all been squeezed out as land is lost to human settlements and farming.reintroduction of carnivores into areas where they once roamed is vital in conservation, say scientists.this relies on human willingness to share the landscape with the likes of the wolf.the research, published in royal society open science, was carried out by christopher wolf and william ripple of oregon state university.they mapped the current range of 25 large carnivores using international union for conservation of nature (iucn) red list data. this was compared with historic maps from 500 years ago. the work shows that large carnivore range contractions are a global issue, said christopher wolf. "of the 25 large carnivores that we studied, 60% (15 species) have lost more than half of their historic ranges,'' he explained. "this means that scientifically sound reintroductions of large carnivores into areas where they have been lost is vital both to conserve the large carnivores and to promote their important ecological effects. "this is very dependent on increasing human tolerance of large carnivores - a key predictor of reintroduction success."image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption the tiger has lost 95% of its rang...





turkey to mark anniversary of coup attempt

media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionturkey's coup attempt - in numbersevents will be held in turkey later to mark the first anniversary of a failed coup in which at least 260 people died and 2,196 were wounded.a faction of the army tried to seize power from president recep tayyip erdogan but the attempt collapsed.since the coup, the government has dismissed more than 150,000 employees from state institutions in a purge that continued until the anniversary's eve.it has rejected criticism, saying it had to root out coup supporters.but the purge, as well as a wave of 50,000 arrests alongside it, have galvanised opposition. critics say mr erdogan is using the purges to stifle political dissent, and last week hundreds of thousands of people gathered in istanbul at the end of a 450km (280-mile) "justice" march against the government. its organiser, opposition politician kemal kilicdaroglu, condemned the coup but said the measures mr erdogan had taken since constituted a "second coup".the president accused the marchers of supporting terrorism.huge rallies are due to take place later on saturday, with president erdogan addressing parliament at the exact time that it was bombed.the day has been declared an annual holiday. mr erdogan will also attend a rally in istanbul on the bridge across the bosphorus where crowds confronted soldiers. image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption this poster shows the faces of men and women who were killed on the night of t...





brexit: eu could be flexible over movement, blair says

image copyrightreuterseu leaders would be prepared to be flexible on freedom of movement of people to accommodate the uk after brexit, tony blair has said.the ex-pm said senior figures had told him they were willing to consider changes to one of the key principles of membership of the single market.eu leaders have previously said the uk cannot stay in the single market, while limiting the free movement of people.the government insists brexit will give the uk greater control of its borders.in a written article for his own institute, mr blair said: "the french and germans share some of the british worries, notably around immigration, and would compromise on freedom of movement."but last week the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, said the freedom of movement of people, goods, services and capital - the key principles of the single market - were "indivisible".prime minister theresa may has pledged to control eu migration and has reiterated her commitment to reducing net migration to the tens of thousands.she has said that outside the single market, and without rules on freedom of movement, the uk will be able to make its own decisions on immigration.mr blair said leaving the single market was a "damaging position" shared by labour and he urged the party's leadership to champion a "radically distinct" position on europe."rational consideration of the options would sensibly include the option of negotiating for britain to stay within a europe itself prepared to refo...





vogue sorry for gigi hadid and zayn malik 'gender fluid' claim

image copyrightinez and vinoodh/vogueimage caption zayn malik and gigi hadid in the us vogue photoshoot us vogue has apologised for "missing the mark" by saying zayn malik and his girlfriend gigi hadid were "embracing gender fluidity".in an interview, the former one directioner and the us model talked about borrowing each other's clothes.they were photographed in colourful, fairly androgynous clothes.but readers mocked the magazine for its definition of the phrase, pointing out that what you wear does not make you "gender fluid". many on social media pointed out that the term refers to people with a particular transgender identity, who do not conform to societal expectations of male or female or identify as either.for instance jacob tobia wrote in cosmopolitan: "if you're going to talk about a marginalised community, talk to that community."unlike how this new vogue cover shoot presents it, the lived experience of being gender-nonconforming is rarely that fun and glamorous."'it's about shapes'vogue describes a conversation between the pair, with hadid telling malik: "i shop in your closet all the time, don't i?". the 24-year-old singer then replies that he borrowed an anna sui t-shirt from her, adding: "i like that shirt. and if it's tight on me, so what? it doesn't matter if it was made for a girl." hadid, 22, agrees, saying: "totally. it's not about gender. it's about, like, shapes. and what feels good on you that day. "and anyway, it's fun...





newspaper headlines: acid attacks and charlie gard dominate

watch the bbc news channel’s press review every evening at 22:40 weekdays, 22:30 and 23:30 weekends and via the bbc iplayer





afghanistan is head abu sayed killed in raid, says us

image copyrightafp/getty imagesimage caption us and afghan forces are said to have killed or captured hundreds of is militants in 2017 the head of so-called islamic state (is) in afghanistan, abu sayed, has been killed in a raid on the group's headquarters in the eastern province of kunar, us officials say.the raid on 11 july also resulted in the deaths of other is members, the pentagon said in a statement on friday.the operation was aimed at "disrupting the group's plans to expand" in afghanistan, the statement added.abu sayed's predecessor, abdul hasib, was killed in a military raid in april.there has been no confirmation of the latest death by is.pentagon spokeswoman dana white said that abu sayed was chosen to lead the group after us and afghan forces killed the previous is leaders hafiz sayed khan in a drone strike in 2016 and abdul hasib earlier this year.is has faced armed opposition from the larger and more powerful afghan taliban and has struggled to increase its support or the amount of territory it holds in afghanistan.kunar is one of the group's main strongholds, along with the eastern province of nangarhar.in addition to the reported killings of sayed and hasib, us and afghan forces have killed or captured hundreds of is militants in an offensive this year, according to the us military.is announced it was moving into afghanistan and pakistan when it declared its so-called khorasan province (sometimes called isis-k) in 2015.in july 2016, a suicide bo...





dad delivers daughter on birmingham dual carriageway

image copyrightsteven sandfordimage caption chloe was born on collector road in birmingham a dad delivered his baby daughter in the car after his partner's waters broke on a birmingham dual carriageway.steven sandford, who says he is squeamish, had no option when it became clear they would not reach the hospital in time.daughter chloe was safely delivered five minutes before paramedics arrived at collector road, with an operator giving instructions over the phone.the couple's other daughter was also in the car during the birth.see more stories from birmingham and the black country hereimage copyrightsteven sandfordimage caption the couple thought they had plenty of time when ms winters' contractions started mr sandford, 45, and his partner joanne winters, 39, were driving from their chelmsley wood home on 27 june when they had to pull over.he said: "it was six in the morning and my partner joanne was having pains every 10 minutes so i thought i'd take my time. "next thing you know it's every four minutes then three minutes. the nurse on the phone said 'you need to get to good hope hospital straight away'."her waters broke in the car so i was panicking; i put my foot down a bit."image copyrightsteven sandfordimage caption "i don't know how i delivered a baby," mr sandford said mr sandford added: "the nurse said you need to pull over, because jo was screaming at this point in the car."i pulled over and then the woman said you need to chec...





turkey dismisses thousands a year after coup attempt

image copyrightepaimage caption turkey has seen mass arrests and dismissals in the public sector since the 2016 coup attempt turkey has dismissed more than 7,000 police, ministry staff and academics, ahead of the first anniversary of an attempted coup. it comes as part of a major purge of state institutions, including the judiciary, police and education, in response to last year's unrest.on saturday, turkey marks one year since rogue soldiers bombed buildings and opened fire on civilians.more than 250 people were killed in the violence. the turkish authorities accuse a movement loyal to the muslim cleric, fethullah gulen, of organising the july 2016 plot to bring down president recep tayyip erdogan. mr gulen, who remains in the united states, denies any involvement. washington has so far resisted calls from the turkish authorities to extradite the cleric.the latest dismissals came in a decree from 5 june but only published by the official government gazette on friday. it says the employees are people "who it's been determined have been acting against the security of the state or are members of a terrorist organisation".among those listed were 2,303 police officers and 302 university academics. another 342 retired officers and soldiers were stripped of their ranks and grades, reuters reports.media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionbbc speaks to man run over by tanks during the attempted coupturkey has already dismissed more than 150,000 officials s...





home office fined £366,900 for breaking pay cap for abuse inquiry chief

image copyrightpaimage caption professor jay was a panel member before being named chair the home office has been fined £366,900 for breaching the government's senior salary pay cap when it appointed the head of a child sex abuse inquiry.it was penalised by the treasury for failing to get clearance in advance before agreeing to pay professor alexis jay £185,000 a year. since 2010, all jobs with salaries of more than £142,500 agreed by ministers have had to be signed off in advance.the home office said it had reviewed procedures to avoid future breaches. prof jay became the fourth chair of the troubled inquiry after replacing lowell goddard in august 2016.the fine also relates to the pay of the inquiry's three panel members one of whom, drusilla sharpling, received a basic salary of £152,424 in 2015-6.on becoming chancellor in 2010, george osborne ruled that public servants directly appointed by ministers should not be paid more than then prime minister david cameron - who was earning £142,500 at the time - unless they were approved by the treasury. it was part of an austerity drive which saw the pay of ministers cut by 5% and then frozen for five years. prof jay was named as chair by home secretary amber rudd at short notice in august 2016. her predecessor, a leading new zealand judge, resigned suddenly following criticism of her conduct of the troubled inquiry.the inquiry is investigating historical allegations of sex abuse against local authorities, religious...





acid attacks: what has led to the rise and how can they be stopped?

image copyrightresham khanimage caption resham khan was left with burns on her face, arms, legs and shoulder after having acid thrown at her the latest acid attacks in north-east london on thursday, which saw five people being sprayed with a corrosive liquid, add to a growing number of cases being reported in the uk.last month cousins resham khan and jameel muhktar were left with life-changing injuries after a corrosive liquid was thrown at them through a car window.and in april clubbers in east london were caught up in an attack involving acid, which left 20 people injured.assaults involving corrosive substances have more than doubled in england since 2012, police figures show. the vast majority of cases were in london. it is legal to purchase strong acid but there have been growing calls for regulations to be tightened in the wake of recent incidents.click to see content: acidattacks_birminghamthe national police chiefs council lead for corrosive attacks, assistant chief constable rachel kearton, told the bbc asian network that reported acid attacks had seen a significant rise in percentage terms, but that compared with knife crime the number of incidents were "tiny". 'i thought i was going blind'image copyrightimran khanimage caption imran khan suffered facial injuries after being attacked while delivering food in east london takeaway restaurant owner imran khan was attacked while out delivering food in barking, east london, in november. he was confront...