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mealtimes reflect uk family life

image copyrightsian davey the definition of a family can range from a traditional household unit to multi-generational living and single parenting.sian davey has travelled the uk showing that there is no "typical" family by photographing people at mealtimes.one such family are the chadwicks. tom, the father of roo and peter, was working as an actor in london before he moved to devon six years ago. "i'd started to yearn for a more simple life," tom says. he bought a caravan and rented out his family home for the summer. from where the caravan is now parked, it's a short walk down to the beach. "you wake up, you get breakfast. you go to the beach and learn to surf, then you come home, clean up and think about dinner," he says. image copyrightsian daveychishamiso mkundi grew up on a farm in zimbabwe. he studied to be an engineer, married and had three sons and a daughter. the political party that chishamiso belonged to was outlawed by robert mugabe. "my presence in zimbabwe threatened my family. so i left to claim asylum in the uk," he says. "my family would join me once i got my refugee status. that was 16 years ago."for the first two years of life in britain, chishamiso slept on the streets in southampton. "when you get wet," he says, "there's no way of getting dry again." he now helps to run a local food bank and assists other asylum seekers. his family remain in zimbabwe.image copyrightsian davey"i was 18 when i gave birth to holly," rebecca says. "to bec...





who are the world's richest women?

image copyrightafpimage caption ms bettencourt was the world's 14th wealthiest person, according to forbes magazine's 2017 list the richest woman in the world has died at the age of 94. heiress of the cosmetics firm l'oreal, liliane bettencourt, had an estimated net worth of 33bn euros (£30bn; $40bn) when she died at her home in paris, france, on thursday. so who is now the world's wealthiest woman? and who is leading the pack when it comes to the british?the world's richest women image copyrightgetty imagesimage caption the wal-mart fortune has seen alice walton become the world's richest woman 1. alice walton - net worth $33.8bn (£25bn)she sat in 17th place on this year's forbes list of the world's billionaires, three places behind ms bettencourt, but has now taken the top spot as the world's richest woman. the only daughter of sam walton, founder of us supermarket giant wal-mart, the 67-year-old american has an estimated net worth of $33.8bn. however, unlike her brothers, she has moved away from the family company and focused on the arts, becoming the chairman of the crystal bridges museum of american art in the family's hometown of bentonville, arkansas. 2. jacqueline mars - net worth $27bn (£20bn)at number 26 on the forbes list, the 77-year-old owns a third of the world's largest confectioner - the other two thirds were split between her brothers until forrest junior's death last year.she worked for the family firm for almost 20 years and s...





greg james and a.dot to host new pop show on bbc one

image caption greg james and a.dot will be joined by a different guest host every week greg james and a.dot have been announced as the hosts of a new, primetime music show on bbc one.sounds like friday night will be the first regular, mainstream music programme on the bbc since top of the pops was cancelled in 2006. broadcast live from television centre, it promises to feature "the hottest bands and artists in the world", alongside interviews and sketches.brit award-winners royal blood have written the show's theme tune."we always imagined doing something like this one day," said the band. "it's great that a new show celebrating live music is back at the bbc and creating a home for new bands to build a bigger audience. we're excited to be a part of it." the show will launch in october.image caption stormzy is among the stars who could perform on the show james, who got his break in student radio, has hosted radio 1's drivetime show since 2012, and reveals the official charts every friday. a.dot is the stage name of ashley charles, a rapper who has performed with busta rhymes and missy elliot. also known as amplify dot or dotty, she currently presents the 1xtra breakfast show, where she has become known for her prank calls feature.the two hosts will be joined by a different guest star every week, who will take part in sketches, as well as performing live.the format seems similar to adele at the bbc - which featured a viral sketch in which adele auditi...





newspaper headlines: may's 'generous' offer to end brexit deadlock

image caption the prime minister is expected to set out the "vision and creativity" needed by the uk and eu members to build a successful brexit, says the daily express. it reports theresa may will say in her florence speech on friday that there is a "bright future" for both sides. the paper also pictures foreign secretary boris johnson and chancellor philip hammond after a marathon two and a half hour cabinet meeting about mrs may's intervention. image caption the prime minister will pledge 20bn euros to settle the uk's "divorce" bill, says the i. the paper adds that a two-year transition proposal will avoid a "cliff edge" for uk businesses. mrs may's proposals, the i says, will attempt to break the deadlock in negotiations between the uk and eu. image caption the financial times says the pm will also use the speech to "enshrine" the rights of eu citizens in the uk in the final exit treaty with the european union. uk courts would be bound by the agreement, so parliament could not transpose any deal into domestic law or dilute the provisions for nationals of eu countries, the ft says. image caption the daily telegraph says mrs may's speech will include a blueprint for a "bold new economic and security partnership", but no concrete offer on what the brexit bill should be. image caption the daily mail says the prime minister will tell the leaders of eu member states that they have a "duty to future generations" to strike a g...





7 days quiz: where was elisabeth moss's secret message hidden?

it's the weekly news quiz - have you been paying attention to what's been going on in the world over the past seven days? click to see content: qotw_22_09_17if you missed last week's quiz, try it herepicture credits: getty images, istockjoin the conversation - find us on facebook, instagram, snapchat and twitter





harry styles t-shirt pricing 'mistake' as fans pay more for larger sizes

harry styles is being criticised over the pricing of t-shirts on his solo tour of north america.fans noticed that while xs, small and medium sizes cost $40 (£29), large, xl and xxl shirts cost $45 (£33).the company selling merchandise at his la gig says it was an error."there was a mistake in size pricing at [wednesday] night's show," according to a representative for live nation. "harry and his team were unaware and this has now been rectified."more related storiesstudent criticises h&m over dress sizesasos backlash for listing size 10 as 'large'boots corrects gender price differencesharry styles opened his north america tour in san francisco on tuesday before playing at the greek theatre in los angeles on wednesday.but on social media, fans weren't happy about the difference in pricing.the one direction singer's next solo concert is on nashville on monday.according to tmz, live nation are taking legal action against the makers of unauthorised harry styles merchandise ahead of his gig in tennessee. he then plays 10 more dates in the us and canada including performances in chicago, boston and new york.he then returns to europe at the end of october before flying to asia, australia and new zealand in november.find us on instagram at bbcnewsbeat and follow us on snapchat, search for bbc_newsbeatrelated topicsentertainmentfashionmoney





southfields burned garden body: two charged with murder

image copyrightryan hooperimage caption the body was found in a rear garden of a house in southfields a man and a woman have been charged with murder after a badly burned body was found in a back garden.ouissem medouni, 40, and sabrina kouider, 34, were arrested in southfields, on wednesday evening.the pair, both of wimbledon park road, have been remanded by wimbledon magistrates. they will appear at the old bailey on 26 september.the person's remains are too charred to work out their gender and age, the met said.det insp richard leonard said detectives were "doing everything we can to identify the deceased".image copyrightryan hooperimage caption a post-mortem examination will be carried out in due course neighbours reported a burning smell and seeing "light smoke" coming from the garden of a property. one local man, who asked not to be named, said his daughter came home with a letter from school as a result of the police activity.a sheringdale primary school spokesman said: "this is an incredibly distressing incident that has come as a great shock to the whole school community."a post-mortem examination will be carried out in due course.





hurricane maria eye nears turks and caicos islands

image copyrightreutersimage caption large parts of puerto rico are under water after the hurricane hurricane maria is nearing the turks and caicos islands as it continues its destructive path across the caribbean.the storm, now a category 3, is east of the island of grand turk with winds of 205km/h (125mph), the us national hurricane center says.puerto rico has completely lost power, and is being subjected to heavy rain and flooding, with possible mudslides.at least 13 people are said to have died there, bringing the death toll so far across the region to 30.among that figure at least 15 lost their lives in dominica, and 20 are still missing after the storm swept through on monday. two others perished on the french island of guadeloupe.puerto rico governor ricardo rossello has called maria the most devastating storm in a century. it knocked out the us territory's entire electricity and telecoms infrastructure."part of the island is lacking communications so what we have are some preliminary assessments about 13 deaths at this juncture," he told cnn. after hurricane irma, maria is the second major storm to hit the caribbean this year.image copyrightafpimage caption high winds are still battering the dominican republic hurricane warnings are in place for british territory the turks and caicos and the south-eastern bahamas, where the storm is heading next.officials in the turks and caicos have opened new shelters as several used during hurricane irma earlier t...





new antibody attacks 99% of hiv strains

image copyrightsplscientists have engineered an antibody that attacks 99% of hiv strains and can prevent infection in primates. it is built to attack three critical parts of the virus - making it harder for hiv to resist its effects.the work is a collaboration between the us national institutes of health and the pharmaceutical company sanofi.the international aids society said it was an "exciting breakthrough". human trials will start in 2018 to see if it can prevent or treat infection. our bodies struggle to fight hiv because of the virus' incredible ability to mutate and change its appearance.these varieties of hiv - or strains - in a single patient are comparable to those of influenza during a worldwide flu season. so the immune system finds itself in a fight against an insurmountable number of strains of hiv. super-antibodiesbut after years of infection, a small number of patients develop powerful weapons called "broadly neutralising antibodies" that attack something fundamental to hiv and can kill large swathes of hiv strains. researchers have been trying to use broadly neutralising antibodies as a way to treat hiv, or prevent infection in the first place. the study, published in the journal science, combines three such antibodies into an even more powerful "tri-specific antibody".dr gary nabel, the chief scientific officer at sanofi and one of the report authors, told the bbc news website: "they are more potent and have greater breadth than any single naturally ...





police federation says a third of police back carrying guns

media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionpolice federation chairman steve white thinks police will carry guns in 15 to 20 yearsmore than a third of police officers in england and wales believe they should be able to carry guns at all times, a survey of 32,000 officers has found.the police federation interviewed a quarter of the workforce, saying 34.1% supported routinely arming officers. in 2006, when the body last conducted firearms research, 23.4% of officers backed routine arming. the national police chiefs' council (npcc) is currently reviewing whether uk police need more armed capacity.of the 32,000 officers who responded to the survey, 8.9% said police should be routinely armed on- or off-duty, and a further 25.2% said police should be armed on-duty only.currently, the majority of police in the uk are unarmed, with exceptions including officers in northern ireland and counter-terrorism police units.steve white, police federation chairman and a former firearms officer, told the bbc that he "sincerely hopes" police do not need to be routinely armed - but said it could happen in 15 to 20 years' time.he said that demands on police had seen "significant changes" over the past decade, including responding to recent terror attacks."we'd been hearing from our members that there are increasing concerns about our firearms capabilities," he said."no-one joins the police service to carry a firearm," mr white added. "things have to develop and we have to ...





rohingya refugees: baby born while fleeing myanmar

conceived in their homeland myanmar but born as a refugee in bangladesh, many children were in their mothers’ womb as they made a tough journey to bangladesh, to save their lives from alleged attacks by army and buddhist mobs.bbc’s neha sharma and shalu yadav met one of the newborns in kutupalong refugee camp.





hurricane maria: woman and children stranded on vessel rescued

a british helicopter has lifted a woman and her two children from a capsized vessel near puerto rico to safety, after being caught in the aftermath of hurricane maria.local media report that a british man was believed to be trapped inside the vessel and died before the others were rescued.





north korea: trump and kim call each other mad

image copyrightepa image caption kim jong-un and donald trump are trading insults after the us president's un speech kim jong-un has said remarks by "deranged" us president donald trump have convinced him he is right to develop weapons for north korea.in an unprecedented personal statement, mr kim said mr trump would "pay dearly" for a un speech where he threatened to "totally destroy" the north if the us was forced to defend itself.mr trump responded that the "madman... will be tested like never before".the two countries have engaged in ever more heated rhetoric in recent months.china responded to the war of words, warning that the situation was "complicated and sensitive"."all relevant parties should exercise restraint instead of provoking each other," said foreign minister spokesman lu kang.russia also urged restraint. kremlin spokesman dmitry peskov said moscow was "deeply concerned by an escalation of tensions".north korea has been testing missiles at an unprecedented rate, and conducted its sixth nuclear test despite international condemnation.north korean foreign minister ri yong-ho, who had earlier compared mr trump's speech to "the sound of a barking dog", has warned that pyongyang could test a hydrogen bomb in the pacific ocean in response to the us president's threat."it could be the most powerful detonation of an h-bomb in the pacific," mr ri said, quoted by south korea's yonhap news agency.however, he added: "we have no idea about w...





brexit: pm bids to break deadlock with two-year deal offer

image copyrightreuterstheresa may will tell eu leaders there is a shared responsibility to make brexit work "smoothly" as she attempts to break the deadlock in negotiations. in a speech in florence, the uk prime minister will say history will judge brexit on the vision showed, not differences faced.the bbc understands she will propose a two-year transitional deal, after march 2019, ahead of a permanent trade deal.it could include payments worth 20bn euros (about £18bn) over the two years.bbc assistant political editor norman smith said mrs may was expected to put an offer on the table to try to get brexit negotiations - due to resume on monday - moving. it is understood mrs may will make what has been described as an "open and generous" offer, potentially worth 20bn euros over the two years - which could plug a black hole in the current eu budget, which runs to 2020 created by the uk's departure in 2019. image caption boris johnson told reporters on friday morning: "it's a great speech" analysisby laura kuenssberg, bbc political editor do expect theresa may's first admission that the uk will ask the eu for as long as two years to make our complete exit. two years during which we might pay billions to keep our existing ties with the single market. two years, after 2019, that could give business breathing space.but this could frustrate some voters who chose to leave, who may see departure now only in the distance.don't expect chapter and verse on the future r...





uber london loses licence to operate

image copyrightreutersimage caption uber lost its private hire licence uber will not be issued a new private hire licence, transport for london (tfl) has said. tfl concluded the ride-hailing app firm was not fit and proper to hold a london private hire operator licence.it said it took the decision on the grounds of "public safety and security implications".confirming it would appeal against the decision, uber said it showed the world "far from being open, london is closed to innovative companies".some 3.5 million passengers and 40,000 drivers use the uber app in london.latest updates and reactionin a statement, uber said: "transport for london and the mayor have caved in to a small number of people who want to restrict consumer choice."uber's general manager in london tom elvidge said: "to defend the livelihoods of all those drivers, and the consumer choice of millions of londoners who use our app, we intend to immediately challenge this in the courts."he said uber operated in more than 600 cities around the world, including more than 40 towns and cities in the uk.there had been growing speculation that the app could be banned from london.opponents of the firm claim it causes gridlocked roads and does not do enough to regulate its drivers.tfl's concerns include uber's approach to carrying out background checks on drivers and reporting serious criminal offences.image copyrightpaimage caption taxi drivers have been campaigning against uber, such as engagi...





parsons green attack: man charged with attempted murder

image copyrightreutersan 18-year-old man has been charged with attempted murder in connection with the parsons green terror attack.ahmed hassan, of sunbury, surrey, will appear at westminster magistrates' court this afternoon, when he will also face a second charge under the explosive substances act.three other men, aged 25, 30 and 17, remain in custody.thirty people were injured last friday when a bomb partially exploded on a district line underground train.many of those had suffered flash burn injuries, while others were hurt in a crush when people ran down a staircase at the station.two other men who had been arrested in connection with the explosion have been released without charge.police are continuing to search one property in surrey and two in newport.





strictly come dancing: can you predict the winner?

media playback is unsupported on your devicemedia captionwhat can you tell from the scores of previous winners and losers? the bbc's reality check team was wondering, after 14 series of strictly come dancing, an extraordinary amount of fake tan and millions of sequins, what can numbers tell us about who might win? we have taken the judges' scores for all the contestants every week for all 14 series of the programme, largely from the fan-site ultimate strictly, and looked at whether you can predict the outcome using statistics.the strictly team does not give out the results of the public vote, even to us, so we'll have to go on what the judges said and which couples were ejected from the competition each week.image caption the first series of strictly, won by natasha kaplinsky and brendan cole, ran for only eight weeks this is what we discovered.has there been points inflation?at first glance it looks as if the number of points the couples get from the judges has been increasing, especially in the first six series.in this chart, we've looked at the average number of points given by the judges in each series. if you've really been concentrating, you'll know that in the 14 series there were a total of four weeks when they had five judges - we've adjusted for that.click to see content: points_per_series_all_weeksbut if you look further into the numbers, it turns out that there is a more important factor than points inflation.the first series of strictly ran for eig...





why some catalans want independence... and some don't

videofour people in catalonia's capital city, barcelona, tell us what it means to be catalan - and why some people there want independence from spain.share this withcopy this linkhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-41356849/why-some-catalans-want-independence-and-some-don-tread more about sharingclose share panel





mealtimes reflect uk family life

image copyrightsian davey the definition of a family can range from a traditional household unit to multi-generational living and single parenting.sian davey has travelled the uk showing that there is no "typical" family by photographing people at mealtimes.one such family are the chadwicks. tom, the father of roo and peter, was working as an actor in london before he moved to devon six years ago. "i'd started to yearn for a more simple life," tom says. he bought a caravan and rented out his family home for the summer. from where the caravan is now parked, it's a short walk down to the beach. "you wake up, you get breakfast. you go to the beach and learn to surf, then you come home, clean up and think about dinner," he says. image copyrightsian daveychishamiso mkundi grew up on a farm in zimbabwe. he studied to be an engineer, married and had three sons and a daughter. the political party that chishamiso belonged to was outlawed by robert mugabe. "my presence in zimbabwe threatened my family. so i left to claim asylum in the uk," he says. "my family would join me once i got my refugee status. that was 16 years ago."for the first two years of life in britain, chishamiso slept on the streets in southampton. "when you get wet," he says, "there's no way of getting dry again." he now helps to run a local food bank and assists other asylum seekers. his family remain in zimbabwe.image copyrightsian davey"i was 18 when i gave birth to holly," rebecca says. "to bec...





7 days quiz: where was elisabeth moss's secret message hidden?

it's the weekly news quiz - have you been paying attention to what's been going on in the world over the past seven days? click to see content: qotw_22_09_17if you missed last week's quiz, try it herepicture credits: getty images, istockjoin the conversation - find us on facebook, instagram, snapchat and twitter